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Thomas Hill
University of Florida
  1.  33
    Women and Moral Theory.Eva Feder Kittay, Carol Gilligan, Annette C. Baier, Michael Stocker, Christina H. Sommers, Kathryn Pyne Addelson, Virginia Held, Thomas E. Hill Jr, Seyla Benhabib, George Sher, Marilyn Friedman, Jonathan Adler, Sara Ruddick, Mary Fainsod, David D. Laitin, Lizbeth Hasse & Sandra Harding - 1987 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    To find more information about Rowman and Littlefield titles, please visit www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  2. Dignity and practical reason in Kant's moral theory.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  3. Autonomy and self-respect.Thomas E. Hill - 1991 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating collection of essays in ethics eschews the simple exposition and refinement of abstract theories. Rather, the author focuses on everyday moral issues, often neglected by philosophers, and explores the deeper theoretical questions which they raise. Such issues are: Is it wrong to tell a lie to protect someone from a painful truth? Should one commit a lesser evil to prevent another from doing something worse? Can one be both autonomous and compassionate? Other topics discussed are servility, weakness of (...)
  4. Dignity and Practical Reason in Kant's Moral Theory.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  5. Respect, pluralism, and justice: Kantian perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 1995 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Respect, Pluralism, and Justice is a series of essays which sketches a broadly Kantian framework for moral deliberation, and then uses it to address important social and political issues. Hill shows how Kantian theory can be developed to deal with questions about cultural diversity, punishment, political violence, responsibility for the consequences of wrongdoing, and state coercion in a pluralistic society.
  6. Servility and self-respect.Thomas E. Hill - 1973 - The Monist 57 (1):87 - 104.
    Thomas E. Hill, Jr.; Servility and Self-Respect, The Monist, Volume 57, Issue 1, 1 January 1973, Pages 87–104, https://doi.org/10.5840/monist197357135.
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  7.  48
    The Practice of Moral Judgment.Thomas E. Hill - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):47.
  8. Human welfare and moral worth: Kantian perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral theory (...)
  9. Kant on imperfect duty and supererogation.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1971 - Kant Studien 62 (1-4):55-76.
  10. The Hypothetical Imperative.Thomas E. Hill - 1973 - Philosophical Review 82 (4):429-450.
  11. The Kantian conception of autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1989 - In John Philip Christman (ed.), The Inner citadel: essays on individual autonomy. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 91--105.
  12. Kantian Constructivism in Ethics.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1989 - Ethics 99 (4):752-770.
  13. Autonomy and benevolent lies.Thomas E. Hill - 1984 - Journal of Value Inquiry 18 (4):251-267.
  14. Symbolic protest and calculated silence.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 1979 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (1):83-102.
  15. Kant.Thomas Hill - 2010 - In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.
     
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  16. Kant on Virtue and the Virtues.Thomas E. Hill & Adam Cureton - 2014 - In Nancy Snow (ed.), Cultivating Virtue: Multiple Perspectives. pp. 87-110.
    Immanuel Kant is known for his ideas about duty and morally worthy acts, but his conception of virtue is less familiar. Nevertheless Kant’s understanding of virtue is quite distinctive and has considerable merit compared to the most familiar conceptions. Kant also took moral education seriously, writing extensively on both the duty of adults to cultivate virtue and the empirical conditions to prepare children for this life-long responsibility. Our aim is, first, to explain Kant’s conception of virtue, second, to highlight some (...)
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  17. Kant and Race.Thomas E. Hill & Bernard Boxill - 2000 - In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Race and Racism. Oxford University Press.
  18.  11
    The Theory and Practice of Autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Noûs 26 (1):99-100.
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  19.  5
    The Stability Problem in Political Liberalism.Thomas E. Hill - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3-4):333-352.
  20. The importance of autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1987 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.), Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 129--138.
  21.  95
    Kant on wrongdoing, desert, and punishment.Thomas E. Hill - 1999 - Law and Philosophy 18 (4):407 - 441.
  22. Moral responsibilities of bystanders.Thomas E. Hill Jr - 2010 - Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (1):28-39.
  23.  16
    Kant's Argument for the Rationality of Moral Conduct.Thomas E. Hill - 1985 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 66 (1-2):3-23.
  24. Treating Criminals as Ends in Themselves.Thomas E. Hill - 2003 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 11.
    Bezugnehmend auf Kants Moralphilosophie entwickelt dieser Beitrag eine These dazu, was mit der Forderung gemeint sein soll, Personen unter Beachtung ihrer Würde bzw. als "Zweck an sich selbst" zu behandeln. Es wird vorgeschlagen, die Implikationen von Kants "Menschheitsformel" als ein Bündel von mit einander verwandten Vorschriften zu interpretieren, die das moralische Nachdenken darüber, wie die Prinzipien unserer tagtäglichen Entscheidungen spezifiziert und interpretiert werden sollten, leiten und begrenzen können. Der Beitrag bearbeitet sodann die folgenden drei Fragestellungen: Was folgt aus dem Vorangehenden (...)
     
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  25.  60
    Weakness of Will and Character.Thomas Hill - 1986 - Philosophical Topics 14 (2):93-115.
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  26.  49
    Finding Value in Nature.Thomas Hill - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):331 - 341.
    This paper explores the idea that a proper valuing of natural environments is essential to (and not just a natural basis for) a broader human virtue that might be called 'appreciation of the good'. This kind of valuing can explain, without any commitment to a metaphysics of intrinsic values, how and why it is good to value certain natural phenomena for their own sakes. The objection that such an approach is excessively human-centred is considered and rebutted.
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  27.  79
    The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics.Thomas E. Hill (ed.) - 2009 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Through a collection of new, previously unpublished essays, _The_ _Blackwell Guide to Kant’s Ethics_ addresses diverse topics crucial to our understanding of Kant's moral philosophy and its implications for the modern age. Provides a fresh perspective on themes in Kant’s moral philosophy Addresses systematically Kant’s foundational work, _Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals_ and his more specific treatment of justice and virtue in _The Metaphysics of Morals_ Includes essays by both established scholars and rising stars Identifies common misperceptions of Kant's (...)
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  28. Kant On Punishment: A Coherent Mix Of Deterrence And Retribution?Thomas E. Hill - 1997 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 5.
    Kant is often regarded as an extreme retributivist, but recently commentators emphasize the importance of deterrence in Kant's basic justification of punishment. Kant's combination of deterrence and retributive elements, however, must be distinguished from others that are less plausible. To interpret Kant as merely adding retributive side-constraints to a basic deterrence aim fails to capture fully the retributive strain in Kant's thought. The basic questions are: who should be punished, how much, in what manner, and why? Kant held that all (...)
     
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  29.  11
    Kant on Wrongdoing, Desert, and Punishment.Thomas E. Hill - 1999 - Law and Philosophy 18 (4):407-441.
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  30.  29
    Collected Papers. [REVIEW]Thomas E. Hill & John Rawls - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy 98 (5):269-272.
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  31.  37
    Finding Value in Nature.Thomas Hill - 2006 - Environmental Values 15 (3):331-341.
    This paper explores the idea that a proper valuing of natural environments is essential to (and not just a natural basis for) a broader human virtue that might be called 'appreciation of the good'. This kind of valuing can explain, without any commitment to a metaphysics of intrinsic values, how and why it is good to value certain natural phenomena for their own sakes. The objection that such an approach is excessively human-centred is considered and rebutted.
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  32.  15
    Imperfect Duties to Oneself.Thomas Hill - 2013 - In Andreas Trampota, Oliver Sensen & Jens Timmermann (eds.), Kant’s “Tugendlehre”. A Comprehensive Commentary. Boston: Walter de Gruyter. pp. 293-308.
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  33.  51
    Conscientious Conviction and Conscience.Thomas E. Hill - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (4):677-692.
    In this paper, I examine critically Kimberley Brownlee’s descriptive criteria for identifying when a person has a conscientious moral conviction. Then, I contrast her conception of conscience with other ideas of conscience, including a religious conception, a relativist conception, and those of Butler and Kant. The concepts examined here are central in her argument that, if civil disobedience is grounded in citizens’ conscience-based conscientious convictions, then it deserves legal and moral protection.
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  34.  7
    Kantian virtue and virtue ethics.Thomas E. Hill - 2008 - In Monika Betzler (ed.), Kant's Ethics of Virtues. De Gruyter. pp. 29-60.
  35.  10
    Introduction.Thomas E. Hill - 2009 - In The Blackwell Guide to Kant's Ethics. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1–16.
    This chapter contains sections titled: The Special Value of a Good Will and Acts from Duty Categorical and Hypothetical Imperatives The Universal Law Formulas The Formula of Humanity as an End in Itself Autonomy and the Kingdom of Ends Deriving the Supreme Moral Principle from Common Moral Ideas Why Kant Needs the Second‐Person Perspective Kant on Law and Justice Kant on Punishment Kant's Vision of a Just World Order Beneficence and Other Duties of Love Duties to Oneself and Duties of (...)
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  36.  95
    A Kantian perspective on political violence.Thomas E. Hill - 1997 - The Journal of Ethics 1 (2):105 - 140.
    Rejecting Kant''s absolute opposition to revolution, I propose a modified Kantian perspective for reflecting on political violence, drawing from Kant''s basic ideas but abandoning some dubious assumptions. Developing suggestions in earlier papers, the essay sketches a model for moral legislation that combines the core ideas of each of Kant''s formulas of the Categorical Imperative. Though only a framework for deliberation, not a complete decision procedure, this excludes extremist positions, prohibitive and permissive, about political violence. Despite Kant''s hopes, the values implicit (...)
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  37.  42
    Is a Good Will Overrated?Thomas E. Hill - 1995 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):299-317.
  38. Kant On Responsibility For Consequences.Thomas E. Hill - 1994 - Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 2.
    In The Metaphysics of Morals Kant suggests that the bad results of wrongful acts can always be imputed to the agent but the bad results of dutiful acts can never be. Although Kant's concern in the context was apparently legal imputation, the article considers how Kant's doctrine might apply to questions about moral responsibility for bad consequences in cases where legal enforcement is inappropriate. First , interpretative questions are addressed. For example, does imputation imply being to blame for bad results (...)
     
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  39.  5
    The Stability Problem in Political Liberalism.Thomas E. Hill - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 75 (3-4):333-352.
  40.  27
    The Importance of Moral Rules and Principles.Thomas E. Hill - unknown
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 2006, given by Thomas E. Hill, Jr., an American philosopher.
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  41.  80
    Assessing moral rules: Utilitarian and Kantian perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2005 - Philosophical Issues 15 (1):158–178.
  42. Autonomy of Moral Agents.Thomas E. Hill - 2001 - In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), Encyclopedia of Ethics. Routledge.
     
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  43.  31
    Rüdiger Bittner on Autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 2013 - Erkenntnis (S7):1-10.
    Rüdiger Bittner surveys with a skeptical eye classic and contemporary ideas of Kantian autonomy. He allows that we can be more or less free in a modest (quasi-Hobbesian) sense and that many people may want more of this freedom from impediments that make it difficult or impossible to do various things. He argues, however, that high-minded general affirmations of human freedom are unfounded and not likely to retain their grip on our thinking. While acknowledging the value of Bittner’s challenges, I (...)
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  44. Supererogation.Thomas E. Hill & Adam Cureton - 2013 - International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
    “Supererogation” is now a technical term in philosophy for a range of ideas expressed by terms such as “good but not required,” “beyond the call of duty,” “praiseworthy but not obligatory,” and “good to do but not bad not to do” (see Duty and Obligation; Intrinsic Value). Examples often cited are extremely generous acts of charity, heroic self-sacrifice, extraordinary service to morally worthy causes, and sometimes forgiveness and minor favors. These concepts are familiar in institutional contexts, for example, when teachers (...)
     
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  45.  3
    Stability, a Sense of Justice, and Self‐Respect.Thomas E. Hill - 2013 - In Jon Mandle & David A. Reidy (eds.), A Companion to Rawls. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 200–215.
    This chapter summarizes briefly what John Rawls meant by stability, the role it plays in Theory of Justice (TJ), and the outline of his main strategies for showing that a well‐ordered society based on his principles of justice would be relatively stable. It presents comments on Rawls's use of developmental moral psychology in support of his claim that societies based on justice as fairness would be relatively stable. The chapter discusses Rawls's conception of self‐respect, its role in his arguments for (...)
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  46.  37
    Practical reason, the moral law, and choice.Thomas Hill - 2012 - Analytic Philosophy 53 (1):71-78.
  47.  5
    Contemporary Ethical Theories; The Forms of Value.Stuart M. Brown, Thomas English Hill & A. L. Hilliard - 1951 - Philosophical Review 60 (2):266.
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  48.  24
    The ability versus intentionality aspects of unconscious mental processes.Maria Czyzewska, Thomas Hill & Pawel Lewicki - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):602-602.
  49.  21
    Gibbard on Morality and Sentiment.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (4):957-960.
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  50.  17
    Beyond Duty: Kantian Ideals of Respect, Beneficence, and Appreciation.Thomas E. Hill - 2021 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    A collection of 17 essays on Kantian moral theory and practical ethics, including papers on autonomy, human dignity, utopian thinking, O'Neill and Rawls on constructivism, tragic choices, philanthropy, conscientious object, suicide, respect, self-respect, and an ideal attitude of appreciation beyond art, nature, and gratitude. TABLE OF CONTENTS Abbreviations for Kant’s Works INTRODUCTION PART II: KANT AND KANTIAN PERSPECTIVES (1) The Groundwork (2) Kant on Imperfect Duties to Oneself (3) Kantian Autonomy and Contemporary Ideas of Autonomy (4) Rüdiger Bittner on Autonomy (...)
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