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Thomas I. White
Loyola Marymount University
  1.  48
    Business, Ethics, and Carol Gilligan's "Two Voices".Thomas I. White - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):51-61.
    This article argues that Carol Gilligan's research in moral development psychology, work which claims that women speak about ethics in a "different voice" than men do, is applicable to business ethics. This essay claims that Gilligan's "ethic of care" provides a plausible explanation for the results of two studies that found men and women handling ethical dilemmas in business differently. This paper also speculates briefly about the management implications of Gilligan's ideas.
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  2.  31
    Business, Ethics, and Carol Gilligan's.Thomas I. White - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):51-61.
    This article argues that Carol Gilligan's research in moral development psychology, work which claims that women speak about ethics in a "different voice" than men do, is applicable to business ethics. This essay claims that Gilligan's "ethic of care" provides a plausible explanation for the results of two studies that found men and women handling ethical dilemmas in business differently. This paper also speculates briefly about the management implications of Gilligan's ideas.
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  3.  5
    Business Ethics: A Philosophical Reader.Thomas I. White - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (4):423-424.
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  4.  13
    Sexual Harassment: Trust and the Ethic of Care.Thomas I. White - 1998 - Business and Society Review 100 (1):9-20.
  5.  26
    Dolphins, Captivity, and SeaWorld: The Misuse of Science.Thomas I. White - 2017 - Business and Society Review 122 (1):119-136.
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  6.  31
    Doing Business in Morally Troubled Waters: Dolphins, the Entertainment Industry, and the Ethics of Captivity.Thomas I. White - 2000 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):197-208.
    This essay argues that humans have not fully understood the cognitive and affective capacities of dolphins, and that we have mistakenly defended as morally acceptable practices that actually harm dolphins. In particular, this essay argues that the current use of hundreds of captive dolphins by Sea World and similar facilities in the entertainment industry is ethically indefensible. Focusing primarily on critical differences between humans and dolphins, this essay argues that central concepts like “intelligence” and “language” should be seen as species-specific, (...)
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  7.  80
    Dolphin People.Thomas I. White - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 49 (49):36-43.
    The existence of nonhuman persons would fly in the face of everything our species has believed about its uniqueness for thousands of years. If an “animal” like a dolphin actually has all of the traits of a “person”, that would call for as fundamental, dramatic and unsettling a shift in how we see ourselves as abandoning a geocentric view of the heavens did. In the same way that Earth no longer occupied the centre of the universe, neither would humans. It (...)
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  8.  4
    Data, Dollars, and the Unintentional Subversion of Human Rights in the IT Industry.Thomas I. White - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (3):453-469.
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  9.  20
    Dolphin People.Thomas I. White - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 49:36-43.
    The existence of nonhuman persons would fly in the face of everything our species has believed about its uniqueness for thousands of years. If an “animal” like a dolphin actually has all of the traits of a “person”, that would call for as fundamental, dramatic and unsettling a shift in how we see ourselves as abandoning a geocentric view of the heavens did. In the same way that Earth no longer occupied the centre of the universe, neither would humans. It (...)
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  10.  35
    Pride and the Public Good: Thomas More's Use of Plato In.Thomas I. White - 1982 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (4):329-354.
  11.  15
    Business, Science and Ethics: A Case Study in the Necessary Evolution of Methodology.Thomas I. White - 2009 - Between the Species 13 (9):8.
    Alasdair MacIntyre and David DeGrazia have explored the question of how sophisticated dolphins’ cognitive abilities are, and these thinkers have taken positions based on a flawed methodology that either assert or imply that dolphins fall below humans when it comes to cognitive sophistication and moral consideration. Timothy Fort uses MacIntyre’s characterization of dolphins in his discussion of the value of biology to business ethics. He thereby makes inaccurate and unsupportable claims, and perpetuates a stereotype about dolphins grounded in unintentional speciesism—a (...)
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  12.  5
    Pride and the Public Good: Thomas More's Use of Plato in "Utopia".Thomas I. White - 1982 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (4):329.
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  13.  9
    Review Whales and Dolphins: Cognition, Culture, Conservation and Human Perceptions Brakes Philippa Simmonds Mark Peter Earthscan London.Thomas I. White - 2013 - Journal of Animal Ethics 3 (2):222-224.
  14.  9
    Review Dolphin Diaries: My 25 Years With Spotted Dolphins in the Bahamas Herzing Denise L. St. Martin's Press New York, NY.Thomas I. White - 2012 - Journal of Animal Ethics 2 (2):227-229.
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  15.  4
    Menschen und Delfine. Ein Versuch uber Anthropozentrismus in der angewandten Umweltethik.Thomas I. White - 2004 - Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 52 (4):603.
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  16. A Study of the Influence of Plato and Aristotle on Thomas More's "Utopia.".Thomas I. White - 1974 - Dissertation, Columbia University
     
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  17. Character Development and Business Ethics Education.Thomas I. White - 2005 - In Sheb L. True, Linda Ferrell & O. C. Ferrell (eds.), Fulfilling Our Obligation: Perspectives on Teaching Business Ethics. Kennesaw State University.
     
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  18. Discovering Philosophy.Thomas I. White - 1991
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  19. Introduction: The Ethics of Captivity.Thomas I. White - 2018 - In Andrew Linzey & Clair Linzey (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Practical Animal Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan Uk.
    Of all the issues related to animal ethics discussed in this handbook, perhaps the most visible is captivity. This chapter begins with an overarching critique of captivity in Lori Gruen’s “Incarceration, Liberty and Dignity.” It proceeds to a fundamental challenge to the ethical defensibility of zoos in Liz Tyson’s “Speciesism and Zoos.” The final set of essays detail the harm produced by the captivity of nonhuman animals who are known to be intellectually, emotionally and socially sophisticated. Catherine Doyle’s “Elephants in (...)
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  20. Whales, Dolphins and Humans: Challenges in Interspecies Ethics.Thomas I. White - 2018 - In Andrew Linzey & Clair Linzey (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of Practical Animal Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan Uk.
    The discoveries of marine mammal scientists over the last 50 years have made it clear that whales and dolphins demonstrate advanced intellectual and emotional traits once believed to be unique to humans. Sadly, discussions of cetacean captivity are regularly marked by unsophisticated approaches to ethics. Senior scientists regularly fail to demonstrate even the most rudimentary skills of ethical analysis. As a result, most discussions of cetacean captivity in the marine mammal community are intellectually +weak—marked by the combination of formal and (...)
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