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  1. The Search After Truth.Nicholas Malebranche, Thomas M. Lennon & Paul J. Olscamp - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 49 (1):146-147.
     
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  2.  32
    Arnauld and the Cartesian Philosophy of Ideas.Thomas M. Lennon - 1989 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):644-647.
  3.  5
    The Battle of the Gods and Giants: The Legacies of Descartes and Gassendi, 1655-1715.Thomas M. Lennon - 1993 - Princeton University Press.
    By the mid-1600s, the commonsense, manifest picture of the world associated with Aristotle had been undermined by skeptical arguments on the one hand and by the rise of the New Science on the other. What would be the scientific image to succeed the Aristotelian model? Thomas Lennon argues here that the contest between the supporters of Descartes and the supporters of Gassendi to decide this issue was the most important philosophical debate of the latter half of the seventeenth century. Descartes (...)
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  4.  47
    The Plain Truth: Descartes, Huet, and Skepticism.Thomas M. Lennon - 2008 - Brill.
    People -- Who was Huet? -- The censura : why and when? -- The birth of skepticism -- Malebranche's surprising silence -- The downfall of cartesianism -- Kinds -- Huet a cartesian? -- Descartes and skepticism : the standard interpretation -- Descartes and skepticism : the texts -- Thoughts -- The cogito : an inference? -- The transparency of mind -- The cogito as pragmatic tautology -- Doubts -- The reality of doubt -- The generation of doubt -- The response (...)
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  5. The Eleatic Descartes.Thomas Lennon - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):29-45.
    : Given Descartes's conception of extension, space and body, there are deep problems about how there can be any real motion. The argument here is that in fact Descartes takes motion to be only phenomenal. The paper sets out the problems generated by taking motion to be real, the solution to them found in the Cartesian texts, and an explanation of those texts in which Descartes appears on the contrary to regard motion as real.
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  6. The Search After Truth and Elucidations of the Search After Truth.Nicolas Malebranche, Thomas M. Lennon & Paul J. Olscamp - 1982 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (2):223-226.
     
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  7.  62
    Descartes's Supposed Libertarianism: Letter to Mesland or Memorandum Concerning Petau?Thomas M. Lennon - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):223-248.
    Descartes’s View of the Will Has generally been found problematic and unsatisfactory, especially by those who have read it, or elements of it, in libertarian terms. Attempts to repair the theory, even by sympathetic interpreters, seem only to have aggravated the view’s putative shortcomings—again, especially among those who have read it, or part of it, in libertarian terms—which suggests that the libertarian reading itself might be unsatisfactory. The aim of this paper is to show that the linchpin text on which (...)
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  8. No, Descartes Is Not a Libertarian.Thomas Lennon - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7:47-82.
     
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  9.  30
    Absential Suspension: Malebranche and Locke on Human Freedom.Julie Walsh & Thomas M. Lennon - 2019 - Journal of Modern Philosophy 1 (1):1-17.
    This paper treats a heretofore-unnoticed concept in the history of the philosophical discussion of human freedom, a kind of freedom that is not defined solely in terms of the causal power of the agent. Instead, the exercise of freedom essentially involves the non-occurrence of something. That being free involves the non-occurrence, that is, the absence, of an act may seem counterintuitive. With the exception of those specifically treated in this paper, philosophers tend to think of freedom as intimately involved with (...)
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  10. Berkeley and the Ineffable.Thomas M. Lennon - 1988 - Synthese 75 (2):231 - 250.
  11.  28
    The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology.Thomas M. Lennon & Robert J. Stainton - unknown
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  12.  12
    Philosophers at War the Quarrel Between Newton and Leibniz.Thomas M. Lennon - 1980
  13.  18
    Reading Bayle.Thomas M. Lennon - 1999 - University of Toronto Press.
    A critical but sympathetic treatment of Pierre Bayle.
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  14.  26
    The Battle of the Gods and Giants: The Legacies of Descartes and Gassendi, 1655-1715.Thomas M. Lennon - 1993 - Princeton University Press.
    These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions.
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  15.  20
    Did Bayle Read Saint-Evremond?Thomas M. Lennon - 2002 - Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (2):225-237.
  16.  64
    Malebranche, the Quietists, and Freedom.Julie Walsh & Thomas M. Lennon - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):69 - 108.
    The Quietist affair at the end of the seventeenth century has much to teach us about theories of the will in the period. Although Bossuet and Fénelon are the names most famously associated with the debate over the Quietist conception of pure love, Malebranche and his erstwhile disciple Lamy were the ones who debated the deep philosophical issues involved. This paper sets the historical context of the debate, discusses the positions as well as the arguments for and against them, and (...)
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  17.  25
    What Kind of a Skeptic Was Bayle?Thomas M. Lennon - 2002 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 26 (1):258–279.
  18.  26
    Descartes.Thomas M. Lennon - 1981 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 19 (2):250-253.
  19.  1
    The Cartesian Empiricism of François Bayle.Thomas M. Lennon - 1992 - Garland.
  20.  39
    Locke and the Logic of Ideas.Thomas M. Lennon - 2001 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (2):155 - 177.
  21.  19
    Veritas Filia Temporis: Hume On Time And Causation.Thomas M. Lennon - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (July):275-290.
  22.  1
    Pierre Bayle.Michael W. Hickson & Thomas M. Lennon - 2017 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  23. Locke on Ideas and Representation.Thomas M. Lennon - 2007 - In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
     
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  24.  38
    The Inherence Pattern and Descartes'.Thomas M. Lennon - 1974 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 12 (1):43-52.
  25.  43
    Descartes and the Seven Senses of Indifference in Early Modern Philosophy.Thomas M. Lennon - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (3):577-602.
    ABSTRACT: Indifference is a term often used to describe the sort of freedom had by the will according to the libertarian, or Molinist account. It is thought to be a univocal term. In fact, however, it is used in at least seven different ways, in a variety of domains during the early modern period. All of them have plausible roots in Descartes, but he himself uses the term in only one sense, and failure to notice this consistent use by him (...)
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  26.  13
    The Battle of the Gods and Giants: The Legacies of Descartes and Gassendi, 1655-1715.Lex Newman & Thomas M. Lennon - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):272.
  27.  6
    A Rejoinder to Mori.Thomas M. Lennon - 2004 - Journal of the History of Ideas 65 (2):335-341.
  28.  30
    Philosophers at War: The Quarrel Between Newton and Leibniz. A. Rupert Hall.Thomas M. Lennon - 1981 - Philosophy of Science 48 (3):502-503.
  29.  16
    Pierre Bayle.Thomas M. Lennon - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  30.  56
    Berkeley on the Act-Object Distinction.Thomas M. Lennon - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (4):651-.
    RÉSUMÉ: Moore attribuait l’idéalisme de Berkeley à sa négligence de la distinction entre l’acte d’appréhension et son objet. Bien que Berkeley ait justement tracé cette distinction dans le premier Dialogue, et l’ait rejetée, peu s’en sont aperçu, et ceux qui l’ont remarqué lui reprochent habituellement de confondre l’acte d’appréhension avec une action. La thèse ici développée est que Berkeley n’est pas coupable de cette confusion et qu’il rejette la distinction, en fait, pour de bonnes raisons à caractère empiriste, qui ont (...)
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  31.  23
    The Rise of Religious Skepticism in the Seventeenth Century.Michael W. Hickson & Thomas M. Lennon - 2018 - In Dan Kaufman (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Seventeenth-century Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 563-582.
  32.  8
    The Will’s Free Choice.Thomas M. Lennon - 2016 - International Philosophical Quarterly 56 (4):411-427.
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  33. Cartesian Views.Thomas Lennon (ed.) - 2003 - Brill.
  34.  7
    The Real Significance of Bayle’s Authorship of the Avis.Michael W. Hickson & Thomas M. Lennon - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 1 (17):191-205.
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  35. Frontmatter.Thomas M. Lennon - 1999 - In Reading Bayle. University of Toronto Press.
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  36. Proust and the Phenomenology of Memory.Thomas M. Lennon - 2007 - Philosophy and Literature 31 (1):52-66.
  37. Bayle, Locke, and the Metaphysics of Toleration.Thomas M. Lennon - 1997 - In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
  38.  36
    True Believers: The Recption of Descartes's Meditations by Malebranche and Huet.D. Anthony Larivière & Thomas M. Lennon - 2002 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 43 (106):89-107.
  39.  43
    Continental Rationalism.Shannon Dea, Julie Walsh & Thomas M. Lennon - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The expression “continental rationalism” refers to a set of views more or less shared by a number of philosophers active on the European continent during the latter two thirds of the seventeenth century and the beginning of the eighteenth. Rationalism is most often characterized as an epistemological position. On this view, to be a rationalist requires at least one of the following: (1) a privileging of reason and intuition over sensation and experience, (2) regarding all or most ideas as innate (...)
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  40.  12
    Malebranche and British Philosophy.Thomas M. Lennon & Charles J. McCracken - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (2):275.
  41. The Main Part and Pillar of Berkeley's Theory: Idealism and Perceptual Heterogeneity.Thomas M. Lennon - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):91-115.
    Berkeley subscribed to the principle of heterogeneity, that what we see is qualitatively and numerically different from what we touch. He says of this principle that it is “the main part and pillar of [his] theory.” The argument I present here is that the theory to which Berkeley refers is not just his theory of vision, but what that theory was the preparation for, which is nothing less than his idealism. The argument turns on the passivity of perception, which is (...)
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  42.  16
    Representationalism, Judgment and Perception of Distance: Further to Yolton and McRae.Thomas M. Lennon - 1980 - Dialogue 19 (1):151-162.
  43.  48
    The Genesis of Berkeley's Theory of Vision Vindicated.Thomas M. Lennon - 2007 - History of European Ideas 33 (3):321-329.
    Berkeley's Theory of Vision, or Visual Language Showing The Immediate Presence and Providence of A Deity, Vindicated And Explained was published in 1733, occasioned by an anonymous letter of the previous year to the London Daily Post Boy . The letter criticized Berkeley's New Theory of Vision , which had been published in 1709, but which had been appended to Berekely's Alciphron , published in 1732. No one has ever identified the author whose criticisms led Berkeley to his Theory of (...)
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  44.  65
    Hume’s Ontological Ambivalence and The Missing Shade of Blue.Thomas M. Lennon - 1979 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):77-84.
  45.  38
    Rules and Relevance: The Au-Ru Equivalence Issue.Thomas M. Lennon - 1984 - Idealistic Studies 14 (2):148-158.
    Peter Winch prefaced The Idea of A Social Science with the above quotation adumbrating his thesis that the rules endowing actions with their sense are, like all rules, relative to a social context. A good example, no less illustrative for being imaginary, is Wittgenstein’s of a society in which lumber is piled in arbitrarily varying heights and priced according to the area occupied by the base of the piles. When asked why they do not price the lumber according to the (...)
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  46.  39
    Descartes and Pelagianism.Thomas Lennon - 2013 - Essays in Philosophy 14 (2):194-217.
    Both in his time, and still now, the name of Descartes has been linked with Pelagianism. Upon close investigation, however, the allegations of Pelagianism and the evidence for them offer very slim pickings. Whether Descartes was a Pelagian is a theological question; the argument here will be that a consideration of Descartes’s claims cited as Pelagian nonetheless promises a better philosophical understanding of his views on the will and other, related matters. After an introduction to Pelagianism , the most prominent (...)
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  47.  52
    The History and Significance of Hume’s Burning Coal Example: Time, Identity, and Individuation.D. Anthony Larivière & Thomas M. Lennon - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 27:511-526.
    This paper examines the function of Hume’s use of a peculiar example from A Treatise of Human Nature. The example in question is that of a burning piece of coal that is whirled around at a sufficient speed to present to a viewer an image of a circle of fire. The example is a common one; and Hume himself points to Locke as his source in this case. Hume’s reference appears accurate since both Locke and Hume seem to marshal the (...)
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  48. 3. Authority.Thomas M. Lennon - 1999 - In Reading Bayle. University of Toronto Press. pp. 42-80.
     
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  49. Bibliography.Thomas M. Lennon - 1999 - In Reading Bayle. University of Toronto Press. pp. 187-194.
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  50. Bibliographical Note.Thomas M. Lennon - 1999 - In Reading Bayle. University of Toronto Press.
     
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