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Thomas M. Osborne
University of St. Thomas, Texas
  1.  92
    Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and Rationalities of Government.Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas S. Rose (eds.) - 1996 - University of Chicago Press.
    Despite the enormous influence of Michel Foucault in gender studies, social theory, and cultural studies, his work has been relatively neglected in the study of politics. Although he never published a book on the state, in the late 1970s Foucault examined the technologies of power used to regulate society and the ingenious recasting of power and agency that he saw as both consequence and condition of their operation. These twelve essays provide a critical introduction to Foucault's work on politics, exploring (...)
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  2. Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and the Rationalities of Government.Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas Rose (eds.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    Foucault is often thought to have a great deal to say about the history of madness and sexuality, but little in terms of a general analysis of government and the state.; This volume draws on Foucault's own research to challenge this view, demonstrating the central importance of his work for the study of contemporary politics.; It focuses on liberalism and neo- liberalism, questioning the conceptual opposition of freedom/constraint, state/market and public/private that inform liberal thought.
     
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  3.  2
    Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, Neo-Liberalism and the Rationalities of Government.Andrew Barry, Thomas Osborne & Nikolas S. Rose (eds.) - 1996 - Routledge.
    Foucault is often thought to have a great deal to say about the history of madness and sexuality, but little in terms of a general analysis of government and the state.; This volume draws on Foucault's own research to challenge this view, demonstrating the central importance of his work for the study of contemporary politics.; It focuses on liberalism and neo- liberalism, questioning the conceptual opposition of freedom/constraint, state/market and public/private that inform liberal thought.
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  4.  44
    Aspects of Enlightenment: Social Theory and the Ethics of Truth.Thomas Osborne - 1998 - Ucl Press.
    Introduction Of enlightenmentality Blackmail - Negative enlightenment - Critique of enlightenment - Postmodernism - Realism and enlightenment - Aspects of ...
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  5.  90
    Ockham as a Divine-Command Theorist.Thomas M. Osborne - 2005 - Religious Studies 41 (1):1-22.
    Although this thesis is denied by much recent scholarship, Ockham holds that the ultimate ground of a moral judgement's truth is a divine command, rather than natural or non-natural properties. God could assign a different moral value not only to every exterior act, but also to loving God. Ockham does allow that someone who has not had access to revelation can make correct moral judgements. Although her right reason dictates what God in fact commands, she need not know that God (...)
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  6. Medicine and Epistemology: Michel Foucault and the Liberality of Clinical Reason.Thomas Osborne - 1992 - History of the Human Sciences 5 (2):63-93.
  7.  13
    Machiavelli and the Liberalism of Fear.Thomas Osborne - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (5):68-85.
    This article revisits the long-standing question of the relations between ethics and politics in Machiavelli’s work, assessing its relevance to the ‘liberalism of fear’ in particular in the work of Judith Shklar, Bernard Williams and also John Dunn. The article considers ways in which Machiavelli has been a ‘negative’ resource for liberalism – for instance, as a presumed proponent of tyranny; but also ways in which even for the liberalism of fear he might be considered a ‘positive’ resource, above all (...)
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  8.  26
    Vitalism as Pathos.Thomas Osborne - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (2):185-205.
    This paper addresses the remarkable longevity of the idea of vitalism in the biological sciences and beyond. If there is to be a renewed vitalism today, however, we need to ask – on what kind of original conception of life should it be based? This paper argues that recent invocations of a generalized, processual variety of vitalism in the social sciences and humanities above all, however exciting in their scope, miss much of the basic originality – and interest – of (...)
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  9. Thomist Premotion and Contemporary Philosophy of Religion.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2006 - Nova et Vetera 4:607-632.
    My argument has three parts. In the first, I shall explain some key Thomist distinctions concerning necessity and premotion. In the second, I shall argue that many philosophers who object to the Thomist position misconstrue the relevant understanding of necessity and contingency. In the third, I shall focus directly on their denial that the doctrine of premotion is helpful for discussions of how God moves the human will. The first two sections illustrate that the Thomists think plausibly that our understanding (...)
     
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  10.  46
    The Limits of Ontology.Thomas Osborne - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (4):97-102.
  11. Which Essence Is Brought Into Being by the Existential Act?Thomas M. Osborne - 2017 - The Thomist 81 (4):471-505.
    I argue that the essence that is actualized by existence is the essence that is a determinate nature in an individual and not the essence absolutely considered. This essence in individuals has a potential being that is actualized by existence. This thesis has important consequences for the essence/existence distinction in Thomas Aquinas.
     
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  12.  6
    Critical Spirituality.Thomas Osborne - 1999 - In Samantha Ashenden & David Owen (eds.), Foucault Contra Habermas: Recasting the Dialogue Between Genealogy and Critical Theory. Sage Publications. pp. 45.
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  13.  83
    Rethinking Anscombe on Causation.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (1):89-107.
    Although Elizabeth Anscombe’s work on causation is frequently cited and anthologized, her main arguments have been ignored or misunderstood as havingtheir basis in quantum mechanics or a particular theory of perception. I examine her main arguments and show that they not only work against the Humean causaltheories of her time, but also against contemporary attempts to analyze causation in terms of laws and causal properties. She shows that our ordinary usage does not connect causation with laws, and suggests that philosophers (...)
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  14.  49
    Utopia, Counter-Utopia.Thomas Osborne - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):123-136.
    This article addresses the question of utopia through some reflections on the work of the Russian writer Andrei Platonov (1899-1951). Platonov's work represents an inspirational series of investigations into the circumstances of utopia: not so much utopia as fantasy, nor utopia as actualized in failure, nor even dystopia, but what is here termed `actually existing utopia'. As such his work captures aspects of utopianism that may have been largely opaque to the investigations of either literary versions of the utopian imagination (...)
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  15. The Augustianism of Thomas Aquinas' Moral Theory.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2003 - The Thomist 67 (2):279-305.
    In this article I argue against some contemporary scholars that Thomas Aquinas holds that grace is in some way necessary for the perfection of even natural virtue, due to original sin. First I show that healing grace is necessary for the fulfillment of ordinary natural moral duties. On account of original sin, human cannot fulfill the precept to naturally love God without healing grace. Moreover, they cannot avoid committing some acts (mortal sins) whereby they are turned away from God. Second, (...)
     
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  16. Perfect and Imperfect Virtues in Aquinas.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2007 - The Thomist 71 (1):39-64.
    The distinctions between the different sense of "perfect" and "imperfect" virtue are essential for understanding Thomas’ view of the development of and connection between the virtues. In this article I set out a fairly traditional schema of the states of virtue and shown how they are found in Thomas’ own texts. An understanding of the distinction between imperfect and perfect acquired virtue is necessary in order to grasp the issue at stake in my previous article on the Augustianism of Thomas (...)
     
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  17.  91
    Human Action in Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2014 - The Catholic University of America Press.
    Although Thomas, Scotus, and Ockham are all broadly Aristotelian, their different Aristotelian accounts reflect underlying disagreements in these three areas. These trends may represent a shift from an earlier to a later medieval intellectual culture, but they also reflect views that continued to exist in different schools. Thomists continued to exist alongside Scotists through the end of the eighteenth century, and Ockham’s views had a more varied but continued influence through the modern period. The different views of Thomas, Scotus, and (...)
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  18.  71
    William of Ockham on the Freedom of the Will and Happiness.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2012 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):435-456.
    When viewed in its historical context, Ockham’s moral psychology is distinctive and novel. First, Ockham thinks that the will is free to will for or against any object, and can choose something that is in some sense not even apparently good. The will is free from the intellect’s dictates and from natural inclinations. Second, he emphasizes the will’s independence not only with respect to passions and habits, but also with respect to knowledge, the effects of original sin, grace, and God. (...)
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  19.  18
    In the Name of Society, or Three Theses on the History of Social Thought.Thomas Osborne & Nikolas Rose - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (3):87-104.
    Who is speaking in the history of social thought? The question of the authentic voice of social thought is typically posed in terms that tend to be either ambitiously theoretical or carefully methodological. Thus histories of social thought frequently offer either a résumé of general ideas about society or a survey which gets bogged down in a rather tedious, nit-picking debate about empirical methodology. This paper is something of a preview of a pro jected attempt on the part of the (...)
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  20. Power, Ethics, Truth: Bernard Williams on Political Argument: Bernard Williams, In the Beginning Was the Deed: Realism and Moralism in Political Argument, Selected, Edited and with an Introduction by Geoffrey Hawthorn. Princeton, NJ and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2005. ISBN 130691124308. 174 Pp. [REVIEW]Thomas Osborne - 2008 - History of the Human Sciences 21 (1):127-134.
  21. Giles of Rome, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines on Whether to See God Is to Love Him.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2013 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 80:57-76.
    Although Giles of Rome, Henry of Ghent, and Godfrey of Fontaines disagree with each other profoundly over the relationship between the intellect and the will, they all think that someone who sees God must also love him in the ordinary course of events. However, Godfrey rejects a central thesis argued for by both Henry and Giles, namely that by God’s absolute power there could be such vision without love. The debate is not about the ability to freely reject or at (...)
     
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  22. Literature in Ruins.Thomas Osborne - 2005 - History of the Human Sciences 18 (3):109-118.
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  23. Practical Reasoning.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
    Aquinas thinks that practical reason is distinct but not entirely insulated from speculative reason. Although his description of practical reasoning applies to a variety of human activities, his greatest focus is on that practical reasoning which is involved in human action. Although practical reasoning resembles the speculative in its use of a kind of syllogism, its connection with particular affairs precisely as contingent gives it a special character.
     
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  24. The Separation of the Interior and Exterior Act in Scotus and Ockham.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2007 - Mediaeval Studies 69:111-139.
    The disagreement between John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham on whether the exterior act has intrinsic moral worth is a turning point for a new understanding of the relationship between the interior and the exterior act. Is someone who successfully commits murder as guilty as someone who fails in her attempt? Does the martyr merit more than someone who merely wills to undergo martyrdom but is denied the opportunity? In these cases, the completion of the act is the exterior (...)
     
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  25. Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus on Individual Acts and the Ultimate End.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2011 - In Kent Emery Russell Friedman (ed.), Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages. pp. 351-374.
    The distinction between Thomas and Scotus on threefold referral is superficially similar in that both use the same terminology of actual, virtual, and habitual referral. For Scotus, an act is virtually referred to the ultimate end through an agent’s somehow explicitly thinking about the end and some sort of causal connection between the virtually intended act and the actually intended act. For Thomas, someone with charity virtually refers his acts to God as the ultimate end not because the act has (...)
     
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  26.  21
    Dominium Regale Et Politicum: Sir John Fortescue's Response to the Problem of Tyranny as Presented by Thomas Aquinas and Ptolemy of Lucca.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2000 - Mediaeval Studies 62 (1):161-187.
  27. The Threefold Referral of Acts to the Ultimate End in Thomas Aquinas and His Commentators.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2008 - Angelicum 85:715-736.
    Thomas discusses the referral of acts to the ultimate end unsystematically and in diverse texts. These texts are interesting in that they raise difficult questions. For example, on Thomas’s view there can be a disparity between the moral value of the act and that of the ultimate end. But what does he mean when he claims that venial sins may be habitually referred to God as the supernatural ultimate end? Moreover, he claims both that every good is desired for the (...)
     
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  28. Review Symposium on Ian Hacking : The Ethics of Indeterminacy.Thomas Osborne - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):113-117.
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  29.  97
    Tales of Hoffman.Thomas Osborne - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (3):115-124.
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  30.  85
    On Intellectual Critique and the Critique of Intellectuals: A Response to Steve Fuller.Gregor McLennan & Thomas Osborne - 2004 - History of the Human Sciences 17 (4):103-107.
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  31. Natural Reason and Supernatural Faith.Thomas M. Osborne - 2019 - In Jeffrey P. Hause (ed.), Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae: A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 188-203.
    Some philosophers seem to argue that faith is or should be produced by arguments, whereas others describe faith as non-rational or even irrational. In the Summa Theologiae, Thomas states that arguments and miracles can show that faith is reasonable, even though unaided reason on its own cannot produce an act of faith. The insufficiency of reason for faith is a necessary condition of faith’s freedom and merit. The explanation of this insufficiency lies in the formal object of faith, which makes (...)
     
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  32. Unbelief and Sin in Thomas Aquinas and the Thomistic Tradition.Thomas Osborne - 2010 - Nova et Vetera 8:613-626.
    During the last fifteen years some theologians during have supported their understanding of how unbelievers might be saved by appealing to Thomas Aquinas and the development of his thought in by sixteenth-century Dominicans at Salamanca. These Salamancan Dominicans applied Thomas’ thought in the context of the New World’s discovery. These recent theologians attribute two claims to this tradition: first, that not every unbeliever is guilty of unbelief, and second, that unbelievers can perform good acts which in some strong manner enable (...)
     
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  33.  38
    MacIntyre, Thomism, and the Contemporary Common Good.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2008 - Analyse & Kritik 30 (1):382-397.
    Alasdair MacIntyre’s criticism of contemporary politics rests in large part on the way in which the political communities of advanced modernity do not recognize common goals and practices. I shall argue that although MacIntyre explicitly recognizes the influence of Jacques Maritain on his own thought, MacIntyre’s own views are incompatible not only with Maritain’s attempt to develop a Thomistic theory which is compatible with liberal democracy, but also relies on a view of the individual as a part which is related (...)
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  34. Augustine and Aquinas on Foreknowledge Through Causes.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2008 - Nova et Vetera 6:219-232.
    In his discussion of how future contingents are known and revealed Thomas systematized what Augustine had developed in his disputes with the Stoics and Pelagians. Thomas shows how logical determinism concerning future contingents is avoided by Aristotelian logic, according to which future contingents have no determinate truth. Moreover, he explicitly unravels how our understanding of causal contingency and necessity is applicable only to created causes. Nevertheless, Augustine had explicitly done the same when he criticized the Stoics not for their position (...)
     
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  35.  2
    Aquinas's Ethics.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    This Element provides an account of Thomas Aquinas's moral philosophy that emphasizes the intrinsic connection between happiness and the human good, human virtue, and the precepts of practical reason. Human beings by nature have an end to which they are directed and concerning which they do not deliberate, namely happiness. Humans achieve this end by performing good human acts, which are produced by the intellect and the will, and perfected by the relevant virtues. These virtuous acts require that the agent (...)
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  36. Continuity and Innovation in Dominic Banez’s Understanding of Esse: Banez's.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2013 - The Thomist 77:367-94.
    Banez’ commentary on I, q. 3, art. 3, is justly well-known for the criticism of earlier Thomists and for its metaphysical acuity. But Banez’ skill is best seen when we read not only his commentary, but the other texts which he himself was reading, such as the works of Capreolus, Soncinas, and Cajetan. In particular, he connects three issues which at first glance might seem unrelated, namely the view that esse is the ultimate act, that it is reduced to the (...)
     
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  37. How Sin Escapes Premotion: The Development of Thomas Aquinas’s Thought by Spanish Thomists.Thomas M. Osborne - 2017 - In Steven Long, Thomas Joseph White & Roger Nutt (eds.), Thomism and Predestination: Principles and Disputations. Ave Maria, Fl: Sapientia. pp. 192-213.
    I argue that Diego Alvarez and Thomas de Lemos through their participation in the De auxiliis controversy developed and defended Cajetan’s view of the causation of sin in such a way that they were able to defend the predetermination of the material aspect of sin while at the same time assimilating important aspects from his critics. It is important to recognize that Lemos and his associates hold both that the premotion of sin’s material aspect is not necessarily connected with the (...)
     
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  38. James of Viterbo's Ethics.Thomas M. Osborne - 2018 - In Antoine Côté & Martin Pickavé (eds.), A Companion to James of Viterbo. Leiden: Brill. pp. 306-330.
    James of Viterbo’s ethical writings focus mostly upon happiness and virtue. His basic approach is Aristotelian. Although he is not a Thomist in the sense that some of his contemporary Dominicans were, he frequently quotes or paraphrases Thomas while arguing for his own positions, especially in response to views defended by such figures as Giles of Rome, Godfrey of Fontaines, and Henry of Ghent. James departs from Thomas by arguing that all acquired virtue is based on an ordered self-love. James’s (...)
     
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  39. Natura Pura: Two Recent Works.Thomas M. Osborne - 2013 - Nova et Vetera 11 (1).
    In two recent books Bernard Mulcahy and Steven Long defend the classical Thomistic understanding of pure nature. They contribute to the longstanding debate over Henri de Lubac’s understanding of the relationship between nature and grace in Thomas Aquinas and the Thomistic tradition. Although Mulcahy and Long criticize de Lubac, they respect his intentions and do not use ad hominem arguments. In order to correctly situate these recent works, it is important to review some elements in the history of the twentieth-century (...)
     
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  40. Plato’s Republic and Its Contemporary Relevance in the Ethics of Rist and MacIntyre.Thomas M. Osborne - 2020 - In Barry David (ed.), Passionate Mind: Essays in Ancient Philosophy,Patristics, and Ethics Honoring Professor John M. Rist. Baden-Baden: Akademia. pp. 371-392.
    the contrast and similarity between Rist and Macintyre can be better understood if we take into account their different interpretations of the Republic, especially their 1) descriptions of the primary problem faced by Plato, 2) their interpretation of Plato’s response to the problem, and 3) their evaluation of the contemporary relevance of the problem and his response. The differences and similarities between the views of MacIntyre and Rist on the Republic reflect much larger difference and similarities on the fundamental nature (...)
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  41. Review. [REVIEW]Thomas Osborne Jr - 2009 - The Thomist 73:506-509.
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  42. Thomas Aquinas on Virtue.Thomas Osborne - 2022 - Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Aquinas produced a voluminous body of work on moral theory, and much of that work is on virtue, particularly the status and value of the virtues as principles of virtuous acts, and the way in which a moral life can be organized around them schematically. Thomas Osborne presents Aquinas's account of virtue in its historical, philosophical and theological contexts, to show the reader what Aquinas himself wished to teach about virtue. His discussion makes the complexities of Aquinas's moral thought (...)
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  43. Thomas and Scotus on Prudence Without All the Major Virtues.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2010 - The Thomist 74 (2):1-24.
    Although Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus disagree over how the acquired moral virtues are connected, the nature of their disagreement is difficult to determine. They and their contemporaries reject the Stoic understanding of this connection, according to which someone either possesses all the acquired moral virtues in the highest degree or none of these virtues at all. Both Thomas and Scotus hold that someone might generally perform just actions and yet be unchaste. Moreover, although they interpret Aristotle differently, both (...)
     
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  44. The Goodness and Evil of Objects and Ends.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2015 - In M. V. Dougherty (ed.), Aquinas’s Disputed Questions on Evil, A Critical Guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 126-45.
    Thomas claims that a human act is specified both by the object and the end, and that the exterior act is the interior act’s object. These claims are best understood in light of the De Malo’s explicit mature teaching that the exterior act can be essentially good or bad, and that it is both the proximate end and the object of the interior act. Since the interior act wills the end, it wills the apprehended exterior act as the formality under (...)
     
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  45. The Natural Love of God Over Self: The Role of Self-Interest in Thirteenth-Century Ethics.Thomas M. Osborne - 2001 - Dissertation, Duke University
    This dissertation uses the context of the thirteenth-century debate about the natural love of God over self to clarify the difference between the ethical system of Thomas Aquinas and that of John Duns Scotus. Although Thomas and Scotus both believe that such love is possible, they disagree about the reasons for this position. ;Early thirteenth-century thinkers, such as William of Auxerre and Philip the Chancellor, were the first to distinguish between a natural love of God and charity, which is a (...)
     
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  46. Tracey Rowland, Ratzinger's Faith: The Theology of Pope Benedict XVI.Thomas M. Osborne Jr - 2009 - The Thomist 73 (3):506.
     
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  47. What is at Stake in the Question of Whether Someone Can Possess the Natural Moral Virtues Without Charity?Thomas M. Osborne - 2017 - In Harm Goris & Henk Schoot (eds.), The Virtuous Life: Thomas Aquinas on the Theological Nature of Moral Virtues. Leuven: Peeters. pp. 117-130.
    The proliferation of new accounts of infused and acquired virtue in Thomas has brought much welcome attention to his understanding of the relationship between nature and grace. But the very originality of these interpretations has raised a multitude of unanswered questions and difficulties. For any of these accounts to be plausible, they must be accompanied by an account of the way in which Thomas thinks that the specifically one virtue of prudence considers the matter of all virtues, and his statement (...)
     
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  48.  42
    1776 and the New Radicalism.Thomas J. Osborne - 1973 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 48 (1):19-32.
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  49. Thomas, Scotus, and Ockham on the Object of Hope.Thomas M. Osborne - 2020 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 87:1-26.
    Thomas Aquinas, John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham disagree over how and whether virtues are specified by their objects. For Thomas, habits and acts are specified by their formal objects. For instance, the object of theft is something that belongs to someone else, and more particularly theft is distinct from robbery because theft is the open taking of another’s good, whereas robbery is open and violent. A habit such as a virtue or a vice shares or takes the act’s (...)
     
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  50.  29
    Les femmes de la généalogie de Jésus dans l'évangile de Matthieu et l'application de la Torah.Thomas P. Osborne - 2010 - Revue Théologique de Louvain 41 (2):243-258.
    Parmi les multiples énigmes de la généalogie de Jésus en Mt 1,1-17, la présence de quatre, voire de cinq femmes dans un texte où prédominent les hommes a suscité de nombreuses tentatives d’explication. Cet article part de l’observation que les quatre premières femmes sont en amont ou complices du roi David, tandis que la cinquième femme est la mère de celui qui est présenté comme Messie. Il constate par ailleurs que si l’on avait appliqué strictement les dispositions de la Torah (...)
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