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Thomas Pogge [111]Thomas W. Pogge [62]Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge [7]ThomasW Pogge [1]
  1. World Poverty and Human Rights.Thomas Pogge - 2005 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):1–7.
    Despite a high and growing global average income, billions of human beings are still condemned to lifelong severe poverty, with all its attendant evils of low life expectancy, social exclusion, ill health, illiteracy, dependency, and effective enslavement. This problem is solvable, despite its magnitude.
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  2.  7
    World Poverty and Human Rights.Thomas Pogge - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):1-7.
    Despite a high and growing global average income, billions of human beings are still condemned to lifelong severe poverty, with all its attendant evils of low life expectancy, social exclusion, ill health, illiteracy, dependency, and effective enslavement. This problem is solvable, despite its magnitude.
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  3.  38
    Politics as Usual: What Lies Behind the Pro-Poor Rhetoric.Thomas W. Pogge - 2010 - Polity.
    Worldwide, human lives are rapidly improving. Education, health-care, technology, and political participation are becoming ever more universal, empowering human beings everywhere to enjoy security, economic sufficiency, equal citizenship, and a life in dignity. To be sure, there are some specially difficult areas disfavoured by climate, geography, local diseases, unenlightened cultures or political tyranny. Here progress is slow, and there may be set-backs. But the affluent states and many international organizations are working steadily to extend the blessings of modernity through trade (...)
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  4. An Egalitarian Law of Peoples.Thomas W. Pogge - 1994 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 23 (3):195-224.
  5. Cosmopolitanism and Sovereignty.Thomas W. Pogge - 1992 - Ethics 103 (1):48-75.
  6. Real World Justice.Thomas Pogge - 2004 - The Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):29-53.
    Despite a high and growing global average income, billions of human beings are still condemned to lifelong severe poverty with all its attendant evils of low life expectancy, social exclusion, ill health, illiteracy, dependency, and effective enslavement. We citizens of the rich countries are conditioned to think of this problem as an occasion for assistance. Thanks in part to the rationalizations dispensed by our economists, most of us do not realize how deeply we are implicated, through the new global economic (...)
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  7.  28
    Realizing Rawls.Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge - 1989 - Cornell University Press.
  8. Measuring Justice: Primary Goods and Capabilities.Thomas Pogge, Erin Kelly, Elizabeth Anderson, Norman Daniels, Lorella Terzi & Colin M. Macleod - unknown - Cambridge University Press.
     
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  9. Human Rights and Global Health: A Research Program.Thomas W. Pogge - 2005 - Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):182-209.
  10. On the Site of Distributive Justice: Reflections on Cohen and Murphy.Thomas W. Pogge - 2000 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (2):137-169.
  11. Severe Poverty as a Violation of Negative Duties.Thomas Pogge - 2005 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):55–83.
    In this article, the last in the symposium on world poverty and human rights, Pogge replies to his critics Mathias Risse, Alan Patten, Rowan Cruft, Norbert Anwander, and Debra Satz.
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  12. Global Justice.Thomas W. Pogge - 2003 - Science and Society 67 (2):261-264.
    Contributors from several countries discuss the central moral issues arising in the emerging global order: the responsibilities of the strongest societies, moral priorities for the next decades, and the role of intellectuals in view of the huge gap between widely expressed moral ambitions and prevailing political and economic realities.
     
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  13.  40
    John Rawls: His Life and Theory of Justice.Thomas Pogge - 2007 - Oup Usa.
    This is a short, accessible introduction to John Rawls' thought and gives a thorough and concise presentation of the main outlines of Rawls' theory as well as drawing links between Rawls' enterprise and other important positions in moral and political philosophy.
  14. Can the Capability Approach Be Justified?Thomas Pogge - 2002 - Philosophical Topics 30 (2):167-228.
  15. Priorities of Global Justice.Thomas Pogge - 2001 - Metaphilosophy 32 (1-2):6-24.
  16. Cohen to the Rescue!Thomas Pogge - 2008 - Ratio 21 (4):454-475.
    Cohen seeks to rescue the concept of justice from those, among whom he includes Rawls, who think that correct fundamental moral principles are fact-sensitive. Cohen argues instead that any fundamental principles of justice, and fundamental moral principles generally, are fact-insensitive and that any fact-sensitive principles can be traced back to fact-insensitive ones. This paper seeks to clarify the nature of Cohen's argument, and the kind of fact-insensitivity he has in mind. In particular, it distinguishes between internal and external fact-sensitivity – (...)
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  17.  24
    Realizing Rawls.Thomas W. Pogge - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (12):716-720.
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  18. Severe Poverty as a Human Rights Violation.Thomas Pogge - 2007 - In Freedom From Poverty as a Human Right: Who Owes What to the Very Poor? Co-Published with Unesco. Oxford University Press.
  19. Moral Universalism and Global Economic Justice.Thomas W. Pogge - 2002 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):29-58.
    Moral universalism centrally involves the idea that the moral assessment of persons and their conduct, of social rules and states of affairs, must be based on fundamental principles that do not, explicitly or covertly, discriminate arbitrarily against particular persons or groups. This general idea is explicated in terms of three conditions. It is then applied to the discrepancy between our criteria of national and global economic justice. Most citizens of developed countries are unwilling to require of the global economic order (...)
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  20. Global Ethics: Seminal Essays.Thomas Winfried Menko Pogge - 2008 - Paragon House.
     
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  21.  9
    World Poverty and Human Rights.Thomas Pogge - 2003 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (4):455-458.
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  22.  4
    Severe Poverty as a Violation of Negative Duties.Thomas Pogge - 2005 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):55-83.
    In this article, the last in the symposium on world poverty and human rights, Pogge replies to his critics Mathias Risse, Alan Patten, Rowan Cruft, Norbert Anwander, and Debra Satz.
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  23.  45
    Real World Justice. Grounds, Principles, Human Rights, and Social Institutions.Andreas Follesdal & Thomas Pogge (eds.) - 2005 - Springer.
    It helps ordinary citizens evaluate their options and their responsibility for global institutional factors, and it challenges social scientists to address the causes of poverty and hunger that act across borders.The present volume ...
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  24. Access to Medicines.Thomas Pogge - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (2):73-82.
    Professor Thomas Pogge, Professorial Fellow, Centre for Applied Philosophy, LPO Box 8260, Canberra. Tel.: +61 261255485; Email: tp6{at}columbia.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract I would pay three million to go into space, says the banker to his attorney. — I wouldn't go if you paid me, the latter laughs, for me the French Riviera is quite exciting enough. Ah, I would pay a million for an extra year of life , the elderly tourist effusively (...)
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  25. The International Significance of Human Rights.Thomas Pogge - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):45-69.
    A comparative examination of four alternative ways of understandingwhat human rights are supports an institutional understanding assuggested by Article 28 of the Universal Declaration: Human rightsare weighty moral claims on any coercively imposed institutionalorder, national or international (as Article 28 confirms). Any suchorder must afford the persons on whom it is imposed secure accessto the objects of their human rights. This understanding of humanrights is broadly sharable across cultures and narrows the philosophical and practical differences between the friends ofcivil and (...)
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  26. Is Kant's Rechtslehre a "Comprehensive Liberalism"?Thomas Pogge - 2012 - In Elisabeth Ellis (ed.), Kant's Political Theory: Interpretations and Applications. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  27. Realizing Rawls.Thomas W. Pogge - 1992 - Ethics 102 (2):395-396.
     
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  28.  48
    Giving Well: The Ethics of Philanthropy.Patricia Illingworth, Thomas Pogge & Leif Wenar (eds.) - 2011 - Oup Usa.
    In GIVING WELL: THE ETHICS OF PHILANTHROPY, an accomplished trio of editors bring together an international group of distinguished philosophers, social scientists, lawyers and practitioners to identify and address the most urgent moral questions arising today in the practice of philanthropy.
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  29.  6
    Rawls on International Justice.Thomas W. Pogge - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):246-253.
    Book reviewed in this article:John Rawls, The Law of Peoples.
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  30. Rawls on International Justice. [REVIEW]Thomas W. Pogge - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):246–253.
    Book reviewed in this article:John Rawls, The Law of Peoples.
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  31.  66
    The Health Impact Fund and its Justification by Appeal to Human Rights.Thomas Pogge - 2009 - Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (4):542-569.
    One important aspect of globalization is the increasingly dense and influential regime of global rules that govern and shape interactions everywhere. Covering trade, investment, loans, patents, copyrights, trademarks, labor standards, environmental protection, use of seabed resources, production and marketing of weapons, maintenance of public security, and much else, these rules—structuring and enabling, permitting and constraining—have a profound impact on the lives of human beings and on the ecology of our planet. It is therefore important to think carefully, in moral terms, (...)
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  32.  43
    The Health Impact Fund: Boosting Pharmaceutical Innovation Without Obstructing Free Access.Thomas Pogge - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (1):78.
    In an earlier piece in these pages, I described the health effects of the still massive problem of global poverty: The poor worldwide face greater environmental hazards than the rest of us, from contaminated water, filth, pollution, worms, and insects. They are exposed to greater dangers from people around them, through traffic, crime, communicable diseases, sexual violence, and potential exploitation by the more affluent. They lack means to protect themselves and their families against such hazards, through clean water, nutritious food, (...)
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  33. Responses to the Critics.Thomas Pogge - 2010 - In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Thomas Pogge and His Critics. Polity.
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  34.  9
    Achieving Democracy.Thomas Pogge - 2001 - Ethics and International Affairs 15 (1):3-23.
    Fledgling democracies may improve their stability through constitutional amendments that bar future unconstitutional governments from borrowing in the country's name or conferring ownership rights to public property, thus reducing the rewards of coups d'état.
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  35. Unknown: The Extent, Distribution, and Trend of Global Income Poverty.Thomas W. Pogge & Sanjay G. Reddy - unknown
    For some thirteen years now, the World Bank (‘the Bank’) has regularly reported the number of people living below an international poverty line, colloquially known as ‘$1/day’.3 Reports for the most recent year, 1998, put this number at 1,175.14 million.4 The Bank’s estimates of severe income poverty — its global extent, geographical distribution, and trend over time — are widely cited in official publications by governments and international organizations and in popular media, often in support of the view that liberalization (...)
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  36. Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship.Luis A. Camacho, Colin Campbell, David A. Crocker, Eleonora Curlo, Herman E. Daly, Eliezer Diamond, Robert Goodland, Allen L. Hammond, Nathan Keyfitz, Robert E. Lane, Judith Lichtenberg, David Luban, James A. Nash, Martha C. Nussbaum, ThomasW Pogge, Mark Sagoff, Juliet B. Schor, Michael Schudson, Jerome M. Segal, Amartya Sen, Alan Strudler, Paul L. Wachtel, Paul E. Waggoner, David Wasserman & Charles K. Wilber - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this comprehensive collection of essays, most of which appear for the first time, eminent scholars from many disciplines—philosophy, economics, sociology, political science, demography, theology, history, and social psychology—examine the causes, nature, and consequences of present-day consumption patterns in the United States and throughout the world.
     
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  37.  70
    The Sustainable Development Goals: A Plan for Building a Better World?Thomas Pogge & Mitu Sengupta - 2015 - Journal of Global Ethics 11 (1):56-64.
    Despite some clear positives, the draft text of the Sustainable Development Goals does not fulfill its self-proclaimed purpose of inspiring and guiding a concerted international effort to eradicate severe poverty everywhere in all of its forms. We offer some critical comments on the proposed agreement and suggest 10 ways to embolden the goals and amplify their appeal and moral power. While it may well be true that the world's poor are better off today than their predecessors were decades or centuries (...)
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  38.  30
    Montréal Statement on the Human Right to Essential Medicines.Thomas Pogge - 2007 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (1):97-108.
    On September 30–October 2, 2005, a group of individuals drawn from civil society organizations, governments, international agencies, and academic institutions came together in Montréal, Québec, Canada, for an international workshop entitled “Human Rights and Access to Essential Medicines: The Way Forward.” At the conclusion of the workshop, we drafted the “Montréal Statement on the Human Right to Essential Medicines.” This “Statement” is reprinted at the end of this comment, which offers some background on the problem addressed at the workshop.
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  39. What is Global Justice?Thomas Pogge - unknown
    The increasingly widespread expression "global justice" marks an important shift in the structure of moral discourse. Traditionally, international relations were seen as sharply distinct from domestic justice. First, it focused on interactions among states, and later, evaluated the design of a national institutional order in light of its effects on citizens. Such institutional moral analysis is becoming applied to supranational institutional arrangements, nowadays more pervasive and important for the life prospects of individuals. The traditional lens suggested fair agreements among states. (...)
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  40. Kant's Theory of Justice.Thomas W. Pogge - 1988 - Kant-Studien 79 (1-4):407-433.
    Following the tradition of classical liberalism, Kant's political philosophy and theory of justice focus on the relation between individual freedom, as the central value of political life, and the state, whose primary normative function is both to restrain and protect individual liberty. In this accessible interpretation of Kant's political philosophy, Allen D. Rosen focuses on the relation among justice, political authority (the state), and individual liberty. He offers interpretations of the ethical bases of Kant's view of justice, of the structure (...)
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  41.  92
    Allowing the Poor to Share the Earth.Thomas Pogge - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):335-352.
    Two of the greatest challenges facing humanity are environmental degradation and the persistence of poverty. Both can be met by instituting a Global Resources Dividend (GRD) that would slow pollution and natural-resource depletion while collecting funds to avert poverty worldwide. Unlike Hillel Steiner's Global Fund, which is presented as a fully just regime governing the use of planetary resources, the GRD is meant as merely a modest but widely acceptable and therefore realistic step toward justice. Paula Casal has set forth (...)
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  42. Relational Conceptions of Justice: Responsibilities for Health Outcomes.Thomas Pogge - 2004 - In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. Oxford University Press. pp. 135--161.
  43. Cosmopolitanism: A Defence.Thomas Pogge - 2002 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 5 (3):86-91.
    David Miller is right that weak cosmopolitanism is undistinctive and strong cosmopolitanism implausibly curtails associative duties. But there are intermediate views that avoid both of these problems. One such view holds that compatriotism makes no difference to our most important negative duties and that among these is the duty not to impose unjust social institutions upon other human beings. On this view, our duty not to impose an unjust institutional order on foreigners is exactly as stringent as our duty not (...)
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  44. A Cosmopolitan Perspective on the Global Economic Order.Thomas Pogge - 2005 - In Gillian Brock & Harry Brighouse (eds.), The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  45.  70
    Justice and the Convention on Biological Diversity.Doris Schroeder & Thomas Pogge - 2009 - Ethics and International Affairs 23 (3):267-280.
    Abstract Benefit sharing as envisaged by the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is a relatively new idea in international law. Within the context of non-human biological resources, it aims to guarantee the conservation of biodiversity and its sustainable use by ensuring that its custodians are adequately rewarded for its preservation. Prior to the adoption of the CBD, access to biological resources was frequently regarded as a free-for-all. Bioprospectors were able to take resources out of their natural habitat and develop (...)
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  46.  28
    The Hunger Games.Thomas W. Pogge - unknown
    Governments and their international agencies conceive of the eradication of hunger and poverty as a worthy wish that will eventually be realized through economic growth. They also make great cosmetic efforts to present as good-looking trend pictures as they can. Citizens ought to insist that the eradication of severe deprivations is a human rights correlative duty that permits no avoidable delay. Academics ought to collaborate toward providing a systematic alternative monitoring of what progress has really been made against undernourishment and (...)
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  47.  29
    Three Problems with Contractarian-Consequentialist Ways of Assessing Social Institutions.Thomas W. Pogge - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):241-266.
    With each of our three criminal-law topics—defining offenses, apprehending suspects, and establishing punishments—we feel, I believe, strong moral resistance to the idea that our practices should be settled by a prospective-participant perspective. This becomes quite clear when we look at how the “reforms” suggested by institutional viewing might combine once we consider all three topics together: imagine a more extensive and swifter use of the death penalty in homicide cases coupled with somewhat lower standards of evidence; or think of backing (...)
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  48.  40
    Achieving Democracy.Thomas Pogge - 2001 - Ethics and International Affairs 15 (1):3–23.
    Fledgling democracies may improve their stability through constitutional amendments that bar future unconstitutional governments from borrowing in the country's name or conferring ownership rights to public property, thus reducing the rewards of coups d'état.
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  49. Responsibilities for Poverty-Related Ill Health.Thomas W. Pogge - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):71–79.
    There is an oft-neglected perspective which the topic of health equity raises: As imposers of the rules, we are inclined to think that harms we inflict through the rules have greater moral weight than like harms we merely fail to prevent or mitigate.
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  50.  10
    Responsibilities for Poverty-Related Ill Health.Thomas W. Pogge - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):71-79.
    There is an oft-neglected perspective which the topic of health equity raises: As imposers of the rules, we are inclined to think that harms we inflict through the rules have greater moral weight than like harms we merely fail to prevent or mitigate.
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