4 found
Order:
  1. Expert Judgement and Expert Disagreement.Jeryl L. Mumpower & Thomas R. Stewart - 1996 - Thinking and Reasoning 2 (2 & 3):191 – 212.
    As Hammond has argued, traditional explanations for disagreement among experts (incompetence, venality, and ideology) are inadequate. The character and fallibilities of the human judgement process itself lead to persistent disagreements even among competent, honest, and disinterested experts. Social Judgement Theory provides powerful methods for analysing such judgementally based disagreements when the experts' judgement processes can be represented by additive models involving the same cues. However, the validity and usefulness of such representations depend on several conditions: (a) experts must agree on (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  18
    How Necessary is the Unconscious as a Predictive, Explanatory, or Prescriptive Construct?Claudia González-Vallejo, Thomas R. Stewart, G. Daniel Lassiter & Justin M. Weindhardt - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):28-28.
    We elucidate the epistemological futility of using concepts such as unconscious thinking in research. Focusing on Newell & Shanks' use of the lens model as a framework, we clarify issues with regard to unconscious-thought theory and self-insight studies. We examine these key points: Brunswikian psychology is absent in UTT; research on self-insight did not emerge to explore the unconscious; the accuracy of judgments does not necessitate the unconscious; and the prescriptive claim of UTT is unfounded.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  5
    Detection of Redundancy in Multiple Cue Probability Tasks.Brian A. Knowles, Kenneth R. Hammond, Thomas R. Stewart & David A. Summers - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):425.
  4.  9
    Positive and Negative Redundancy in Multiple Cue Probability Tasks.Brian A. Knowles, Kenneth R. Hammond, Thomas R. Stewart & David A. Summers - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (1):157.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark