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  1.  57
    Roger Bacon on Equivocation.Thomas S. Maloney - 1984 - Vivarium 22 (2):85-112.
  2.  37
    The Extreme Realism of Roger Bacon.Thomas S. Maloney - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (4):807 - 837.
    THE problem of universals has been with us at least since the time of Plato and it is no surprise that the first solution was what can be termed a realist one. Not a few have argued that there is something commonsensical about the claim that we call some things by a common term because it seems quite plausible that there are kinds of things and that they are not entirely the creations of our minds. The path of realism has (...)
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  3.  45
    A Roger Bacon Bibliography.Jeremiah M. G. Hackett & Thomas S. Maloney - 1987 - New Scholasticism 61 (2):184-207.
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  4. The Extreme Realism of Bacon, Roger.Thomas S. Maloney - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 38 (4):807-837.
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  5.  26
    Who Is the Author of the Summa Lamberti?Thomas S. Maloney - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):89-106.
    Two persons have been proposed as the author of the Summa Lamberti, a thireenth-century treatise on logic. Franco Alessio takes him to be the Auxerre Dominican Lambert of Ligny-le-Châtel, and he basis his claim on Dominican sources from the fourteenth to the nineteenth centuries. Recently, Alain de Libera has presented a counter-proposal: the author was Lambert of Lagny, a secular cleric at the time of the composition, who afterwards became a Dominican. This claim is based on the acta of the (...)
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  6.  15
    Roger Bacon on the Division of Statements Into Single/Multiple and Simple/Composed.Thomas S. Maloney - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (2):297 - 321.
    IT IS CERTAINLY THE CASE that twelfth- and thirteenth-century treatises on logic represent in great part attempts to represent the Organon, Aristotle’s books on logic, by rearranging the material, adding clarifications, and sometimes breaking new ground as in the case of the treatise on the property of terms. Thus when Roger Bacon is writing his Summulae dialectices around 1252, he is confronted by the problem of what to do with the material on the classification of statements into single or multiple, (...)
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