25 found
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  1. The Evolution of Foresight: What is Mental Time Travel, and is It Unique to Humans?Thomas Suddendorf & Michael C. Corballis - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):299-313.
    In a dynamic world, mechanisms allowing prediction of future situations can provide a selective advantage. We suggest that memory systems differ in the degree of flexibility they offer for anticipatory behavior and put forward a corresponding taxonomy of prospection. The adaptive advantage of any memory system can only lie in what it contributes for future survival. The most flexible is episodic memory, which we suggest is part of a more general faculty of mental time travel that allows us not only (...)
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  2.  71
    Mental Time Travel in Animals?Thomas Suddendorf & Janie Busby - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (9):391-396.
    Are humans alone in their ability to reminisce about the past and imagine the future? Recent evidence suggests that food-storing birds (scrub jays) have access to information about what they have stored where and when. This has raised the possibility of mental time travel (MTT) in animals and sparked similar research with other species. Here we caution that such data do not provide convincing evidence for MTT. Examination of characteristics of human MTT (e.g. non-verbal declaration, generativity, developmental prerequisites) points to (...)
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  3.  61
    Imitation, Mirror Neurons and Autism.Justin H. G. Williams, Andrew Whiten, Thomas Suddendorf & David I. Perrett - unknown
    Various deficits in the cognitive functioning of people with autism have been documented in recent years but these provide only partial explanations for the condition. We focus instead on an imitative disturbance involving difficulties both in copying actions and in inhibiting more stereotyped mimicking, such as echolalia. A candidate for the neural basis of this disturbance may be found in a recently discovered class of neurons in frontal cortex, 'mirror neurons' (MNs). These neurons show activity in relation both to specific (...)
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  4.  52
    The Nature of Visual Self-Recognition.Thomas Suddendorf & David L. Butler - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):121-127.
    Visual self-recognition is often controversially cited as an indicator of self-awareness and assessed with the mirror-mark test. Great apes and humans, unlike small apes and monkeys, have repeatedly passed mirror tests, suggesting that the underlying brain processes are homologous and evolved 14-18 million years ago. However, neuroscientific, developmental, and clinical dissociations show that the medium used for self-recognition (mirror vs photograph vs video) significantly alters behavioral and brain responses, likely due to perceptual differences among the different media and prior experience. (...)
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  5.  29
    Feelings of the Future.Beyon Miloyan & Thomas Suddendorf - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):196-200.
  6.  48
    Mental Time Travel: Continuities and Discontinuities.Thomas Suddendorf - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (4):151-152.
  7.  8
    Thinking About Threats: Memory and Prospection in Human Threat Management.Adam Bulley, Julie D. Henry & Thomas Suddendorf - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 49:53-69.
  8.  14
    The Future is Here: A Review of Foresight Systems in Anxiety and Depression. [REVIEW]Beyon Miloyan, Nancy A. Pachana & Thomas Suddendorf - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):795-810.
  9.  17
    Anxiety: Here and Beyond.Beyon Miloyan, Adam Bulley & Thomas Suddendorf - 2018 - Emotion Review 11 (1):39-49.
    The future harbours the potential for myriad threats to the fitness of organisms, and many species prepare accordingly based on indicators of hazards. Here, we distinguish between defensive responses on the basis of sensed cues and those based on autocues generated by mental simulations of the future in humans. Whereas sensed threat cues usually induce specific responses with reference to particular features of the environment or generalized responses to protect against diffuse threats, autocues generated by mental simulations of the future (...)
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  10.  3
    Flexible Planning in Ravens?Jonathan Redshaw, Alex H. Taylor & Thomas Suddendorf - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (11):821-822.
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  11.  9
    Evolution, Lies, and Foresight Biases.Thomas Suddendorf - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):38-39.
    Humans are not the only animals to deceive, though we might be the only ones that lie. The arms race von Hippel & Trivers (VH&T) propose may have only started during hominin evolution. VH&T offer a powerful theory, and I suggest it can be expanded to explain why there are systematic biases in human foresight.
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  12.  25
    Response to Gallup Et Al.: Are Rich Interpretations of Visual Self-Recognition a Bit Too Rich?Thomas Suddendorf & David L. Butler - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (2):58-59.
  13.  15
    Episodic Memory Versus Episodic Foresight: Similarities and Differences.Thomas Suddendorf - 2010 - WIREs Cognitive Science 1 (1):99-107.
    There are logical and empirical grounds that link episodic memory and the ability to imagine future events. In some sense, both episodic memory and episodic foresight may be regarded as two sides of the same capacity to travel mentally in time. After reviewing some of the recent evidence for commonalities, I discuss limits of these parallels. There are fundamental differences between thinking about past and future events that need to be kept in clear view if we are to make progress (...)
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  14.  36
    Meta-Representation and Secondary Representation.Andrew Whiten & Thomas Suddendorf - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):378-378.
  15.  66
    Mental Time Travel Across the Disciplines: The Future Looks Bright.Thomas Suddendorf & Michael C. Corballis - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (3):335-345.
    There is a growing interest in mental time travel in cognitive psychology, neuroscience, developmental psychology, comparative psychology, and evolutionary psychology. Here we review current issues in each of these disciplines. To help move the debates forward we name and distinguish 15 key hypotheses about mental time travel. We argue that foresight has for too long lived in the shadows of research on memory and call for further research efforts.
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  16.  33
    Explaining Human Cognitive Autapomorphies.Thomas Suddendorf - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):147-148.
    The real reason for the apparent discontinuity between human and nonhuman minds is that all closely related hominids have become extinct. Nonetheless, I agree with Penn et al. that comparative psychology should aim to establish what cognitive traits humans share with other animals and what traits they do not share, because this could make profound contributions to genetics and neuroscience. There is, however, no consensus yet, and Penn et al.'s conclusion that it all comes down to one trait is premature.
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  17.  60
    Simpler for Evolution: Secondary Representation in Apes, Children, and Ancestors.Thomas Suddendorf - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):131-131.
    Great apes show behavioural evidence for secondary representation similar to that of children of about two years of age. However, there is no convincing evidence for metarepresentation in apes. A good evolutionary interpretation should be parsimonious and must bring developmental and comparative data in accord. I propose a model based on the work of Perner (1991) and close by pointing out a logical flaw in Heyes’ second proposed experiment.
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  18.  32
    Like It or Not? The Mental Time Travel Debate: Reply to Clayton Et Al.Thomas Suddendorf & Janie Busby - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (10):437-438.
  19.  10
    There is No Compelling Evidence That Human Neonates Imitate.Siobhan Kennedy-Costantini, Janine Oostenbroek, Thomas Suddendorf, Mark Nielsen, Jonathan Redshaw, Jacqueline Davis, Sally Clark & Virginia Slaughter - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  20.  44
    If I Could Talk to the Animals.Thomas Suddendorf, Mark E. Borrello, Colin Allen & Gregory Radick - 2012 - Metascience 21 (2):253-267.
    If I could talk to the animals Content Type Journal Article Category Book Symposium Pages 1-15 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9553-1 Authors Thomas Suddendorf, School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Mark E. Borrello, Program in the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Colin Allen, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, College of Arts and Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA Gregory Radick, Centre for History and Philosophy of Science, (...)
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  21.  5
    Misconceptions About Adaptive Function.Jonathan Redshaw & Thomas Suddendorf - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  22.  44
    Theory of Mind and the Origins of Divergent Thinking.Thomas Suddendorf & Claire Fletcher-Flinn - 1997 - Journal of Creative Behavior 31:169-179.
    The development of a `theory of mind' may not only be important for understanding the minds of others but also for using one's own mind. To investigate this supposition, forty children between the ages of three and four were given false-belief and creativity tasks. The numbers of appropriate and of original responses in the creativity test were found to correlate positively with performance on false-belief tasks. This association was robust, as it continued to be strong and significant even when age (...)
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  23.  4
    Using Foresight to Prioritise the Present.Adam Bulley, Gillian Pepper & Thomas Suddendorf - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  24.  18
    A Brief History of Monkey Business. [REVIEW]Thomas Suddendorf - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):703-713.
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  25.  8
    The Evolution of Concepts: A Timely Look.Michael Corballis & Thomas Suddendorf - 2010 - In Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.), The Making of Human Concepts. Oxford University Press. pp. 365.