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Thomas Williams
University of South Florida
  1.  9
    A Theory of Criterion Setting with an Application to Sequential Dependencies.Michel Treisman & Thomas C. Williams - 1984 - Psychological Review 91 (1):68-111.
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  2.  46
    Anselm.Sandra Visser & Thomas Williams - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    The reason of faith -- Thought and language -- Truth -- The Monologion arguments for the existence of God -- The Proslogion argument for the existence of God -- The divine attributes -- Thinking and speaking about God -- Creation and the word -- The Trinity -- Modality -- Freedom -- Morality -- Incarnation and atonement -- Original sin, grace, and salvation.
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  3.  54
    Consulting Communities on Feedback of Genetic Findings in International Health Research: Sharing Sickle Cell Disease and Carrier Information in Coastal Kenya. [REVIEW]Vicki Marsh, Francis Kombe, Raymond Fitzpatrick, Thomas N. Williams, Michael Parker & Sassy Molyneux - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):41.
    International health research in malaria-endemic settings may include screening for sickle cell disease, given the relationship between this important genetic condition and resistance to malaria, generating questions about whether and how findings should be disclosed. The literature on disclosing genetic findings in the context of research highlights the role of community consultation in understanding and balancing ethically important issues from participants’ perspectives, including social forms of benefit and harm, and the influence of access to care. To inform research practice locally, (...)
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  4. Dialogic Practice in Primary Schools: How Primary Head Teachers Plan to Embed Philosophy for Children Into the Whole School. Education Studies.Sue Lyle & Thomas Williams - 2012 - Educational Studies 38 (1):1-12.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project is an ongoing research project to explore the impact of philosophy for children (P4C) on classroom practice. this paper responds on the responses of head teachers, teachers and local educational authority (LA) officers in South Wales, UK, to the initial training programme in P4C carried out by the University School of Education. Achieving change in schools through the embedding of new practices is an important challenge for head teacher.s Interviews and qualitative questionnaires were (...)
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  5.  15
    Personalism.Thomas D. Williams - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  6. Human Freedom and Agency.Thomas Williams - 2011 - In Brian Davies & Eleonore Stump (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Aquinas. Oxford University Press. pp. 199-208.
    This paper considers Aquinas's accounts of the end of human action and the structure of human action, examines the debate between intellectualist and voluntarist interpretations of Aquinas, and corrects mistaken accounts of Aquinas's views on freedom, necessitation, and causation.
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  7.  35
    Anselm: Basic Writings.Thomas Williams - 2007 - Hackett.
    Ranging from his early treatises, the ’Monologion’ (a work written to show his monks how to meditate on the divine essence) and the ’Proslogion’ (best known for its advancement of the so-called ontological argument for the existence of God), to his three philosophical dialogues on metaphysical topics such as the relationship between freedom and sin, and late treatises on the Incarnation and salvation, this collection of Anselm’s essential writings will be of interest to students of the history of philosophy and (...)
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  8. The Doctrine of Univocity is True and Salutary.Thomas Williams - 2005 - Modern Theology 21 (4):575-585.
    I shall confine my attention to the one Scotist doctrine that seems to be singled out as especially worrisome, the doctrine of univocity. In the first part of the paper I argue that the doctrine of univocity is true. So even if the doctrine has unwelcome consequences, we ought to affirm it anyway; it is not the job of the theologian or philosopher to shrink from uncomfortable truths. In the second part I argue further that the doctrine of univocity is (...)
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  9.  19
    Knowing Who to Trust: Exploring the Role of 'Ethical Metadata' in Mediating Risk of Harm in Collaborative Genomics Research in Africa.Jantina de Vries, Thomas N. Williams, Kalifa Bojang, Dominic P. Kwiatkowski, Raymond Fitzpatrick & Michael Parker - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):62.
    The practice of making datasets publicly available for use by the wider scientific community has become firmly integrated in genomic science. One significant gap in literature around data sharing concerns how it impacts on scientists’ ability to preserve values and ethical standards that form an essential component of scientific collaborations. We conducted a qualitative sociological study examining the potential for harm to ethnic groups, and implications of such ethical concerns for data sharing. We focused our empirical work on the MalariaGEN (...)
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  10.  94
    The Evolution of a Human Nature.Thomas Rhys Williams - 1959 - Philosophy of Science 26 (1):1-13.
    This discussion recounts the development of several anthropological definitions of human nature. It then examines conclusions of studies in other disciplines that make possible a revised empirical definition of human nature and which have led to re-examination of paleoanthropological data classed as unimportant under the rubrics of preceeding studies. Finally, this discussion appraises certain of these data, as they pertain to the question: "Do empirical evidences suggest that a human nature, as well as a human structure, may be the product (...)
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  11.  84
    Reason, Morality, and Voluntarism in Duns Scotus: A Pseudo-Problem Dissolved.Thomas Williams - 1997 - Modern Schoolman 74 (2):73-94.
    In some passages Scotus seems to endorse a thoroughgoing voluntarism, holding not merely that the moral law is established entirely by God's will, but even that there is no reason why God wills in one way rather than another. In other passages, however, Scotus insists that reason plays an important role in morality—that right reason is an essential element in the moral goodness of an action, and that moral truth is accessible to natural reason. -/- Many commentators have supposed that (...)
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  12.  69
    Lying, Deception, and the Virtue of Truthfulness: A Reply to Garcia.Thomas Williams - 2000 - Faith and Philosophy 17 (2):242-248.
    In “Lies and the Vices of Deception,” J. L. A. Garcia argues that lying is always immoral, since it always involves a motivation contrary to the proper discharge of a morally determinative role. I argue that Garcia fails to show that anyone who fails in the sub-role of information-giver thereby fails in a morally determinative role, that the sub-role of information-giver is precisely that of “informing another truthfully,” that lying deviates from the motivation characteristic of someone with the virtue of (...)
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  13. Anselm’s Account of Freedom.Thomas Williams & Sandra Visser - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):221-244.
    In this paper we offer a reconstruction of Anselm’s account of freedom that resolves various apparent inconsistencies. The linchpin of this account is the definition of freedom. Anselm argues that the power to preserve rectitude for its own sake requires the power to initiate an action of which the agent is the ultimate cause, but it does not always require that alternative possibilities be available to the agent. So while freedom is incompatible with coercion and external causal determination, an agent (...)
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  14.  63
    Aquinas in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophy: Eleonore Stump’s Aquinas. [REVIEW]Thomas Williams - 2005 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (3):483-491.
    In her volume on Aquinas for Routledge’s “Arguments of the Philosophers” series, Eleonore Stumps aims at an interpretation of Aquinas that is historically faithful but also responsive to the concerns of contemporary philosophers. I assess her success in attaining this twofold aim by examining in detail Stump’s overview of Aquinas’s metaphysics, which engages with contemporary debates over constitution and identity, and her interpretation of Aquinas’s account of justice, which brings Aquinas into dialogue with Annette Baier and Thomas Nagel. I conclude (...)
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  15. Two Aspects of Platonic Recollection.Thomas Williams - 2002 - Apeiron 35 (2):131 - 152.
    Notwithstanding considerable disagreement over certain details, writers on Plato’s theory of recollection are broadly in agreement regarding some of the main features. Setting aside for the moment those who doubt that Plato ever held any considered doctrine so well‐developed as to constitute a theory of recollection at all, we can find a substantial scholarly consensus in favor of the following account: In the Phaedo Plato argues that all human beings recollect the Forms. Such recollection is meant to account for the (...)
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  16.  12
    Complexity Without Composition in Advance.Jeff Steele & Thomas Williams - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
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  17.  6
    Anselm on Free Choice and Character Formation.Thomas Williams - 2017 - Faith and Philosophy 34 (2):223-234.
    Character formation is a central theme in Katherin Rogers’s Freedom and Self-Creation: Anselmian Libertarianism. According to Rogers, Anselm holds that the purpose of free choice is to afford creatures the possibility of creating their own characters through their free choices. I argue that Anselm has no doctrine of character formation. Accordingly, he does not hold the view of the purpose of free choice that Rogers attributes to him. Creatures cannot bring about justice in themselves, let alone increase it by their (...)
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  18. Moral Vice, Cognitive Virtue.Thomas Williams - 2003 - Philosophy and Literature 27 (1):223-230.
    An examination of jealousy and envy in the novels of Jane Austen.
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  19.  93
    How Scotus Separates Morality From Happiness.Thomas Williams - 1995 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 69 (3):425-445.
    As everyone who discusses Scotus's moral theory points out, Scotus recognized two fundamental inclinations in the will: the affectio commodi and the affectio iustitiae. Everyone agrees that these two affectiones play an important role in his moral theory, and there is virtual unanimity about what that role is. I contend that the standard view is misguided, and that it obscures the true character of Scotus's very un-medieval moral theory. I shall begin by laying out the context in which Scotus develops (...)
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  20.  27
    From Metaethics to Action Theory.Thomas Williams - 2003 - In The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus. Cambridge University Press. pp. 332-351.
    Work on Scotus's moral psychology and action theory has been concerned almost exclusively with questions about the relationship between will and intellect and in particular about the freedom of the will itself. In this essay I broaden the scope of inquiry. For I contend that Scotus's views in moral psychology are best understood against the background of a long tradition of metaethical reflection on the relationship between being and goodness. In the first section of this essay, therefore, I sketch the (...)
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  21.  69
    The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts, Vol. 2: Ethics and Political Philosophy.Thomas Williams, Arthur Stephen McGrade, John Kilcullen & Matthew Kempshall - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (4):576.
  22.  17
    Introduction–The Life and Works of John Duns the Scot.Thomas Williams - 2003 - In The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1--14.
    An overview of the life and works of John Duns Scotus (now largely out of date, thanks to the progress of various editions).
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  23.  43
    The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus.Thomas Williams (ed.) - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    Each volume in this series of companions to major philosophers contains specially commissioned essays by an international team of scholars, together with a substantial bibliography, and will serve as a reference work for students and non-specialists. One aim of the series is to dispel the intimidation such readers often feel when faced with the work of a difficult and challenging thinker. John Duns Scotus was one of the three principal figures in medieval philosophy and theology, with an influence on modern (...)
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  24.  58
    John Duns Scotus.Thomas Williams - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    John Duns Scotus (1265/66-1308) was one of the most important and influential philosophertheologians of the High Middle Ages. His brilliantly complex and nuanced thought, which earned him the nickname "the Subtle Doctor," left a mark on discussions of such disparate topics as the semantics of religious language, the problem of universals, divine illumination, and the nature of human freedom. This essay first lays out what is known about Scotus's life and the dating of his works. It then offers an overview (...)
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  25.  78
    The Unmitigated Scotus.Thomas Williams - 1998 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 80 (2):162-181.
    Scotus is notorious for occasionally making statements that, on their face at least, smack of voluntarism, but there has been a lively debate about whether Scotus is really a voluntarist after all. Now the debate is not over whether Scotus lays great emphasis on the role of the divine will with respect to the moral law. No one could sensibly deny that he does, and if such an emphasis constitutes voluntarism, then no one could sensibly deny that Scotus is a (...)
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  26.  28
    Benefits and Payments for Research Participants: Experiences and Views From a Research Centre on the Kenyan Coast.M. Marsh Vicki, M. Kamuya Dorcas, M. Mlamba Albert, N. Williams Thomas & S. Molyneux Sassy - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics (1):13-.
    Background: There is general consensus internationally that unfair distribution of the benefits of research is exploitative and should be avoided or reduced. However, what constitutes fair benefits, and the exact nature of the benefits and their mode of provision can be strongly contested. Empirical studies have the potential to contribute viewpoints and experiences to debates and guidelines, but few have been conducted. We conducted a study to support the development of guidelines on benefits and payments for studies conducted by the (...)
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  27.  4
    Anselm’s Account of Freedom.Thomas Williams & Sandra Visser - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):221-244.
    According to Anselm's official definition, freedom of choice is ‘the power to preserve rectitude of will for the sake of that rectitude itself.’ From the point of view of contemporary metaphysics, this is one of the most unhelpful definitions imaginable. Does such freedom require alternative possibilities, for example? Is it compatible with causal determination? Is the exercise of such freedom a necessary and sufficient condition for moral responsibility? The definition sheds no light on these questions.And so we need to move (...)
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  28. Augustine and the Platonists.Thomas Williams - manuscript
    I start with a story to convey what I think is the essence of the Platonic outlook that Augustine adopts. Then I’ll show you how various Platonists put the insights that this story encapsulates to work in three different aspects of philosophy. After I’ve laid all that out, I’ll talk about how Augustine transforms this Platonic picture in the light of his Christian faith..
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  29.  9
    Complexity Without Composition.Jeff Steele & Thomas Williams - 2019 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 93 (4):611-631.
    John Duns Scotus recognizes complexity in God both at the level of God’s being and at the level of God’s attributes. Using the formal distinction and the notion of “unitive containment,” he argues for real plurality in God, but in a way that permits him to affirm the doctrine of divine simplicity. We argue that his allegiance to the doctrine of divine simplicity is purely verbal, that he flatly denies traditional aspects of the doctrine as he had received it from (...)
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  30.  62
    Anselm on Truth.Thomas Williams & Sandra Visser - 2005 - In Brian Leftow & Brian Davies (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Anselm. Cambridge University Press. pp. 204-221.
    A good place to start in assessing a theory of truth is to ask whether the theory under discussion is consistent with Aristotle’s commonsensical definition of truth from Metaphysics 4: “What is false says of that which is that it is not, or of that which is not that it is; and what is true says of that which is that it is, or of that which is not that it is not.”1 Philosophers of a realist bent will be delighted (...)
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  31.  42
    A Most Methodical Lover?: On Scotus's Arbitrary Creator.Thomas Williams - 2000 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (2):169-202.
    The paper argues against interpretations that appeal to divine justice and rationality in order to mitigate the apparent arbitrariness of Scotus's God with respect to creation.
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  32.  85
    The Franciscans.Thomas Williams - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 167-183.
    It is somewhat misleading to think of the Franciscans as forming a “school” in ethics, since there was a fair bit of diversity among Franciscans. Nonetheless, one can identify certain characteristic tendencies of Franciscan moral thought, and certain “celebrity” Franciscans whose views in ethics and moral psychology are particularly noteworthy. I shall first offer an overview of the general character of Franciscan moral thought in the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries and then turn to a more detailed examination of (...)
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  33.  19
    The “Difficult Patient” Conundrum in Sickle Cell Disease in Kenya: Complex Sociopolitical Problems Need Wide Multidimensional Solutions.Vicki Marsh, George Mocamah, Emmanuel Mabibo, Francis Kombe & Thomas N. Williams - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (4):20 - 22.
    (2013). The “Difficult Patient” Conundrum in Sickle Cell Disease in Kenya: Complex Sociopolitical Problems Need Wide Multidimensional Solutions. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 13, No. 4, pp. 20-22. doi: 10.1080/15265161.2013.767960.
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  34.  80
    Recent Work on Saint Augustine.Thomas Williams - 2000 - Philosophical Books 41 (3):145-153.
    An overview of major work on Augustine published between 1990 and 2000.
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  35.  29
    The Libertarian Foundations of Scotus's Moral Philosophy.Thomas Williams - 1998 - The Thomist 62 (2):193-215.
    After setting out in part 1 Scotus's libertarian account of the will, I shall discuss two of the most important implications Scotus understood his account to have. First, according to Scotus, the Thomist understanding of the will as intellective appetite is inadequate to provide a libertarian account of freedom. Scotus therefore rejects that understanding and offers an alternative moral psychology. In part 2 of the paper I therefore draw attention to the passages in which Scotus offers his reasons for rejecting (...)
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  36.  67
    Anselm's Quiet Radicalism.Thomas Williams - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (1):1-20.
    It is characteristic of Anselm to adopt the formulations of his authorities while giving them meanings of his own, hiding conceptual disagreement by means of verbal echoes. Anselm's considerable originality sometimes goes unnoticed because readers see the standard Augustinian language and miss the fact that Anselm uses it to state un-Augustinian views. One striking instance of Anselm's quiet radicalism is his understanding of free choice and the fall. He seems to uphold standard Augustinian privation theory when he affirms that injustice (...)
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  37. Sin, Grace, and Redemption in Abelard.Thomas Williams - 2004 - In Kevin Guilfoy & Jeffrey Brower (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Abelard. Cambridge University Press. pp. 258-278.
    "From time to time some of my friends startle me by referring to the Atonement itself as a revolting heresy," wrote Austin Farrer, "invented by the twelfth century and exploded by the twentieth. Yet the word is in the Bible." (1) Farrer is referring to Romans 5:11 in the Authorized Version: "we also joy in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom we have now received the atonement." Here the word 'atonement'--literally, the state of being "at one"--translates the Greek (...)
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  38.  20
    John Duns Scotus.Thomas Williams - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 611--619.
    An overview of the life and philosophical works of John Duns Scotus.
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  39.  55
    Some Reflections on Method in the History of Philosophy.Thomas Williams - manuscript
    So I present myself this morning not as an expert with wisdom to impart, but as a neophyte reflecting on his own practice with a view toward getting clearer on the vision of philosophical historiography that underlies it and thereby, perhaps, improving that practice. The paper will fall into two tenuously connected parts. The first part contains a general reflection on method that I wrote a few years back which has since been published in Czech but has not had any (...)
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  40.  54
    God Who Sows the Seed and Gives the Growth.Thomas Williams - 2007 - Anglican Theological Review 2007:611-627.
    This paper examines Anselm's pneumatology.
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  41.  38
    Review of Ronald Cole-Turner, Ed., Design and Destiny: Jewish and Christian Perspectives on Human Germline Modification. 1. [REVIEW]Thomas D. Williams - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):84-85.
  42. Credo Ut Mirer: Anselm on Sacred Beauty.Thomas Williams - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (3/4):181-188.
    Anselm had a particular interest in the art of painting. He saw a close analogy between physical beauty and rational beauty. Both can be represented—physical beauty by paintings, rational beauty through discourse—and Anselm was especially attentive to the possibility of misrepresentation. Deceptive rhetorical coloring can mislead; unworthy discourse can obscure the truth’s inherent beauty. Yet even when discourse does justice to the beauty it is intended to represent, Anselm places strict limits on the appeal to beauty. For beauty by itself (...)
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  43. The Cambridge Companion to Duns Scotus.Thomas Williams - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (215):321-323.
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  44.  32
    Duns Scotus, Metaphysician.Thomas Williams - 1995 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):125-127.
    Review of Allan B. Wolter and Daniel A. Frank, Duns Scotus: Metaphysician.
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  45.  53
    Anselm’s Proslogion.Thomas Williams - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):613-616.
    Up to this point, Anselm has been known for two quite different kinds of work: his devotional writings, which aim to move and inspire the reader and are marked by an ornate style that relies heavily on alliteration and antitheses and suchlike ornaments, and his Monologion, a work of what has come to be known as analytic theology, written in straightforward, unadorned, philosophical prose that aspires only to clarity and precision. In his new work, Proslogion, Anselm attempts to combine the (...)
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  46.  46
    Nad metodou historie filosofie.Thomas Williams - 2005 - Studia Neoaristotelica 2 (2):214-218.
    reflections on method in the historiography of philosophy.
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  47.  87
    Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus: Natural Theology in the High Middle Ages (Review).Thomas Williams - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 483-485.
    In this ambitious study, Alexander W. Hall examines the two preeminent figures of the golden age of natural theology: Thomas Aquinas and John Duns Scotus. Hall is not so much concerned with retracing particular proofs of the existence of God and derivations of the divine attributes—well-worn paths in discussions of medieval natural theology—as with investigating the larger philosophical issues that are raised by the project of natural theology, such as the nature of scientia and demonstrative arguments, and accounts of signification (...)
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  48.  66
    Augustine's Intellectual Conversion: The Journey From Platonism to Christianity.Thomas Williams - 2011 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011.
    Review of Brian Dobell, Augustine's Intellectual Conversion.
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  49.  73
    Describing God.Thomas Williams - 2009 - In Robert Pasnau (ed.), The Cambridge History of Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 749-760.
    The philosophical problem of describing God arises at the intersection of two different areas of inquiry. The word ‘describing’ makes it clear that the issue is in part a logical one – in the broad medieval sense of ‘logic,’ which includes semantics, the philosophy of language, and even some aspects of the theory of cognition. It is the problem, first, of forming an understanding of some extramental object and, second, of conveying that understanding by means of verbal signs. But the (...)
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  50.  30
    Biblical Interpretation.Thomas Williams - 2001 - In Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Augustine. Cambridge University Press. pp. 59--70.
    This paper examines Augustine's exegetical theory and practice, with particular emphasis on the epistemology that undergirds his Biblical interpretation and the moral constraints on exegesis that Augustine sets forth on De doctrina christiana.
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