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Tia Powell [28]Tia P. Powell [2]
  1.  19
    COVID in NYC: What We Could Do Better.Tia Powell & Elizabeth Chuang - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):62-66.
    New York City hospitals expanded resources to an unprecedented extent in response to the COVID pandemic. Thousands of beds, ICU beds, staff members, and ventilators were rapidly incorporated into h...
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  2.  9
    “We’Re Not Ready, But I Don’T Think You’Re Ever Ready.” Clinician Perspectives on Implementation of Crisis Standards of Care.Elizabeth Chuang, Pablo A. Cuartas, Tia Powell & Michelle Ng Gong - 2020 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 11 (3):148-159.
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  3.  13
    Practical, Ethical, and Legal Challenges Underlying Crisis Standards of Care.James G. Hodge, Dan Hanfling & Tia P. Powell - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (s1):50-55.
    Public health emergencies invariably entail difficult decisions among medical and emergency first responders about how to allocate essential, scarce resources. To the extent that these critical choices can profoundly impact community and individual health outcomes, achieving consistency in how these decisions are executed is valuable. Since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, however, public and private sector allocation plans and decisions have followed uncertain paths. Lacking empirical evidence and national input, various entities and actors have proffered multifarious approaches on (...)
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  4.  5
    Older Adults and Covid‐19: The Most Vulnerable, the Hardest Hit.Tia Powell, Eran Bellin & Amy R. Ehrlich - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):61-63.
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  5.  24
    Face Transplant: Real and Imagined Ethical Challenges.Tia Powell - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):111-115.
    Ethical lapses associated with the first facial transplant included breaches of confidentiality, bending of research rules, and film deals. However, discussions of the risk-benefit ratio for face transplantation are often deficient in that they ignore the needs, experience, and decision-making capability of potential recipients.
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  6.  12
    Legal and Ethical Concerns About Sexual Orientation Change Efforts.Tia Powell & Edward Stein - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s4):S32-S39.
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  7.  6
    “Tho’ Much is Taken, Much Abides”: A Good Life Within Dementia.Tia Powell - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S3):S71-S74.
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  8.  16
    Face Transplant: Real and Imagined Ethical Challenges.Tia Powell - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):111-115.
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  9.  15
    A Good Death.Tia Powell & Adira Hulkower - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):28-29.
    A good death is hard to find. Family members tell us that loved ones die in the wrong place—the hospital—and do not receive high-quality care at the end of life. This issue of the Hastings Center Report offers two articles from authors who strive to provide good end-of-life care and to prevent needless suffering. We agree with their goals, but we have substantial reservations about the approaches they recommend. Respect for the decisions of patients and their surrogates is a relatively (...)
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  10.  14
    Extubating Mrs. K: Psychological Aspects of Surrogate Decision Making.Tia Powell - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (1):81-86.
    Mrs. K is a thirty-one-year-old Russian-speaking mother of two, who was brought in by ambulance after attempting suicide by jumping in front of train. Probable depression x months. Stressor: lost custody battle over older child. Current status: deep coma, ventilator-dependent, and prognosis grim. Next of kin is estranged husband; he demands participation in medical decision making. Legal proxy is patient's boyfriend; forcibly removed from the intensive care unit for agitated behavior and alcohol intoxication.I magine the difficulty for the ICU staff (...)
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  11.  13
    Extubating Mrs. K: Psychological Aspects of Surrogate Decision Making.Tia Powell - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (1):81-86.
    Mrs. K is a thirty-one-year-old Russian-speaking mother of two, who was brought in by ambulance after attempting suicide by jumping in front of train. Probable depression x months. Stressor: lost custody battle over older child. Current status: deep coma, ventilator-dependent, and prognosis grim. Next of kin is estranged husband; he demands participation in medical decision making. Legal proxy is patient's boyfriend; forcibly removed from the intensive care unit for agitated behavior and alcohol intoxication.I magine the difficulty for the ICU staff (...)
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  12.  24
    Against Placebos.Tia Powell & Jason Bailey - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (12):23-25.
  13.  83
    Refusing Life-Sustaining Treatment After Catastrophic Injury: Ethical Implications.Tia Powell & Bruce Lowenstein - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (1):54-61.
    In theory, a competent patient may refuse any and all treatments, even those that sustain life. The problem with this theory, confidently and frequently asserted, is that the circumstances of real patients may so confound us with their complexity as to shake our confident assumptions to their core.For instance, it is not the case that one may always and easily know which patients are competent. Indeed, evaluation of decision-making capacity is notoriously difficult. Not only may reasonable and experienced evaluators, say (...)
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  14.  12
    Refusing Life-Sustaining Treatment After Catastrophic Injury: Ethical Implications.Tia Powell & Bruce Lowenstein - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (1):54-61.
    In theory, a competent patient may refuse any and all treatments, even those that sustain life. The problem with this theory, confidently and frequently asserted, is that the circumstances of real patients may so confound us with their complexity as to shake our confident assumptions to their core.For instance, it is not the case that one may always and easily know which patients are competent. Indeed, evaluation of decision-making capacity is notoriously difficult. Not only may reasonable and experienced evaluators, say (...)
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  15.  22
    Carrots and Sticks: Keeping Healthcare Workers on the Job in a Public Health Disaster.Tia Powell - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (8):20 – 21.
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  16.  20
    Culture and Communication: Medical Disclosure in Japan and the U.S.Tia Powell - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):18 – 20.
    1The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and not those of the New York State Task Force on Life & the Law, nor of New York State government.
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  17.  20
    A Modest Proposal for Reducing Imperfection and Resolving World Hunger.Tia Powell & Adrienne Asch - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):53-55.
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  18.  10
    Warm and Dead?J. K. Miles, Jeri A. Conboy, Aluko A. Hope & Tia Powell - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (5):9-10.
    Robert F. is an eighty-five-year-old who suffered a heart attack at home in a rural location some thirty minutes from any major hospital. By the time the paramedics arrived, he was unconscious and nonresponsive. After spontaneous return of circulation, they began their standard procedure of therapeutic hypothermia. Robert's core temperature was lowered using ice packs, and cold intravenous fluids were initiated. Soon afterward, Robert started to shiver when his body temperature reached 35.6° Celsius. He was then given a bolus of (...)
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  19.  22
    Cultural Context in Medical Ethics: Lessons From Japan.Tia Powell - 2006 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 1:4.
    This paper examines two topics in Japanese medical ethics: non-disclosure of medical information by Japanese physicians, and the history of human rights abuses by Japanese physicians during World War II. These contrasting issues show how culture shapes our view of ethically appropriate behavior in medicine. An understanding of cultural context reveals that certain practices, such as withholding diagnostic information from patients, may represent ethical behavior in that context. In contrast, nonconsensual human experimentation designed to harm the patient is inherently unethical (...)
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  20.  10
    Commentary: Support for Case-Based Analysis in Decision Making After a Suicide Attempt.Tia Powell - 2007 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 18 (2):119-121.
  21.  19
    Dietary Supplements: Reports Reviewed by Tia Powell and Barbara A. Noah.Tia Powell - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (4):857-865.
    The Institute of Medicine’s 2005 publication, Dietary Supplements: A Framework for Evaluating Safety, is authoritative and thorough, and thus representative of other reports by the Institute of Medicine. What makes this report particularly interesting, however, is the rich political subtext that exists in the interstices of the report, popping up here and there in brief comments and barely suppressed yelps of exasperation. To understand this context, it is useful to reflect for a moment on the special nature of the IOM (...)
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  22.  13
    Family Participation in the Care of Patients in Public Health Disasters.Tia Powell - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (4):288.
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  23.  14
    LVADs and the Limits of Autonomy.Tia Powell - 2008 - Hastings Center Report 38 (3):4-5.
  24.  3
    OK, Boomer, MD: The Rights of Aging Physicians and the Health of Our Communities.Tia Powell - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (6):3-3.
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  25.  19
    On Promoting Rational Treatment, Not Rational Suicide.Tia Powell & Donald B. Kornfeld - 1992 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (4):334-335.
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  26.  13
    The Time Is Now:Bioethics and LGBT Issues.Tia Powell & Mary Beth Foglia - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s4):S2-S3.
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  27.  61
    Wrestling Satan and Conquering Dopamine: Addiction and Free Will.Tia Powell - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):14 – 15.
  28.  16
    Employer Requirements to Work During Emergency Responses: Key Ethics Considerations.Lainie Rutkow, Holly A. Taylor & Tia Powell - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (s1):73-76.
    Local health departments and their employees are at the forefront of emergency preparedness and response. Yet, recent studies have found that some local public health workers are unwilling to report to work in a variety of disaster scenarios. This can greatly compromise a response, as many local health departments need “all hands on deck” to effectively meet increased demands. To address these concerns, local health departments have employed varied policy strategies to ensure that employees do report to work. After describing (...)
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