Results for 'Tim Booth'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Growing Up with Parents Who Have Learning Difficulties.Tim Booth & Wendy Booth - 1998 - Routledge.
    _Growing up with Parents who have Learning Difficulties_ uses a life-story approach to present new evidence about how children from such families manage the transition to adulthood, and about the longer-term outcomes of such an upbringing. It offers a view of parental competence as a social attribute rather than an individual skill, assessing the implications for institutional policies and practices. The authors address the notion of children having to parent their disabled parents and argue for a shift in emphasis from (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Promoting Coherent Minimum Reporting Guidelines for Biological and Biomedical Investigations: The MIBBI Project.Chris F. Taylor, Dawn Field, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Jan Aerts, Rolf Apweiler, Michael Ashburner, Catherine A. Ball, Pierre-Alain Binz, Molly Bogue, Tim Booth, Alvis Brazma, Ryan R. Brinkman, Adam Michael Clark, Eric W. Deutsch, Oliver Fiehn, Jennifer Fostel, Peter Ghazal, Frank Gibson, Tanya Gray, Graeme Grimes, John M. Hancock, Nigel W. Hardy, Henning Hermjakob, Randall K. Julian, Matthew Kane, Carsten Kettner, Christopher Kinsinger, Eugene Kolker, Martin Kuiper, Nicolas Le Novere, Jim Leebens-Mack, Suzanna E. Lewis, Phillip Lord, Ann-Marie Mallon, Nishanth Marthandan, Hiroshi Masuya, Ruth McNally, Alexander Mehrle, Norman Morrison, Sandra Orchard, John Quackenbush, James M. Reecy, Donald G. Robertson, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Henry Rodriguez, Heiko Rosenfelder, Javier Santoyo-Lopez, Richard H. Scheuermann, Daniel Schober, Barry Smith & Jason Snape - 2008 - Nature Biotechnology 26 (8):889-896.
    Throughout the biological and biomedical sciences there is a growing need for, prescriptive ‘minimum information’ (MI) checklists specifying the key information to include when reporting experimental results are beginning to find favor with experimentalists, analysts, publishers and funders alike. Such checklists aim to ensure that methods, data, analyses and results are described to a level sufficient to support the unambiguous interpretation, sophisticated search, reanalysis and experimental corroboration and reuse of data sets, facilitating the extraction of maximum value from data sets (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  3.  9
    How Might We Live? Global Ethics in the New Century.Ken Booth, Tim Dunne & Michael Cox (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume looks outward to the twenty-first century and to the dynamics of this first truly global age. It asks the fundamental question: how might human societies live? In contrast to the orthodoxies of academic Philosophy and International Relations in much of the twentieth century, which marginalised or rejected the study of ethics, the contributors here believe that there is nothing more political than ethics, and therefore deserving of scholarly analysis. By exploring some of the oldest questions about duties and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4.  18
    [Symposium] Anthony Robert Booth Islamic Philosophy and the Ethics of Belief. [REVIEW]Scott Forrest Aikin, Sabeen Ahmed, John Casey, Miriam Galston, Ethan Mills & Anthony Booth - 2018 - Syndicate Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Collected Essays, Ed. And Tr. By M. Booth.Rudolf Christoph Eucken & Meyrick Booth - 1914
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Main Currents of Modern Thought, Tr. By M. Booth.Rudolf Christoph Eucken & Meyrick Booth - 1912
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Marriage and the Sex-Problem, Tr. By M. Booth.Friedrich Wilhelm Foerster & Meyrick Booth - 1912
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. On Some Recent Moves in Defence of Doxastic Compatibilism.Anthony Robert Booth - 2014 - Synthese 191 (8):1867-1880.
    According to the doxastic compatibilist, compatibilist criteria with respect to the freedom of action rule-in our having free beliefs. In Booth (Philosophical Papers 38:1–12, 2009), I challenged the doxastic compatibilist to either come up with an account of how doxastic attitudes can be intentional in the face of it very much seeming to many of us that they cannot. Or else, in rejecting that doxastic attitudes need to be voluntary in order to be free, to come up with a (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  9.  45
    The Company We Keep.Wayne Booth - 1988 - University of California Press.
    Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  10.  17
    The Company We Keep: An Ethics of Fiction.Wayne C. Booth - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (1):98-100.
    In _The Company We Keep_, Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature. But the questions he asks are not confined to morality. Returning ethics to its root sense, Booth proposes that the ethical critic will be interested in any effect on the ethos, the total character or quality of tellers and listeners. Ethical criticism will risk talking about the quality of _this_ particular encounter with _this_ particular work. Yet (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  11.  64
    Equilibria in Social Belief Removal.Richard Booth & Thomas Meyer - 2010 - Synthese 177 (1):97 - 123.
    In studies of multi-agent interaction, especially in game theory, the notion of equilibrium often plays a prominent role. A typical scenario for the belief merging problem is one in which several agents pool their beliefs together to form a consistent "group" picture of the world. The aim of this paper is to define and study new notions of equilibria in belief merging. To do so, we assume the agents arrive at consistency via the use of a social belief removal function, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  15
    Modern Dogma and the Rhetoric of Assent.Wayne C. Booth - 1974 - University of Chicago Press.
    When should I change my mind? What can I believe and what must I doubt? In this new "philosophy of good reasons" Wayne C. Booth exposes five dogmas of modernism that have too often inhibited efforts to answer these questions.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  13.  8
    Economies of Time-Rejoinder.William James Booth - 1991 - Political Theory 19 (4):656-661.
    A Critical Response to William James Booth's article in Economics of Time.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  14
    Metaphor as Rhetoric: The Problem of Evaluation.Wayne C. Booth - 1978 - Critical Inquiry 5 (1):49-72.
    What I am calling for is not as radically new as it may sound to ears that are still tuned to positivist frequencies. A very large part of what we value as our cultural monuments can be thought of as metaphoric criticism of metaphor and the characters who make them. The point is perhaps most easily made about the major philosophies. Stephen Pepper has argued, in World Hypotheses,1 that the great philosophies all depend on one of the four "root metaphors," (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  15.  18
    Freedom of Interpretation: Bakhtin and the Challenge of Feminist Criticism.Wayne C. Booth - 1982 - Critical Inquiry 9 (1):45-76.
    In turning to the language of freedom, I am not automatically freed from the dangers of reduction and self-privileging. "Freedom" as a term is at least as ambiguous as "power" . When I say that for me all questions about the politics of interpretation begin with the question of freedom, I can either be saying a mouthful or saying nothing at all, depending on whether I am willing to complicate my key term, "freedom," by relating it to the language of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. The Company We Keep: An Ethics of Fiction.Wayne C. Booth - 1989 - University of California Press.
    In _The Company We Keep_, Wayne C. Booth argues for the relocation of ethics to the center of our engagement with literature. But the questions he asks are not confined to morality. Returning ethics to its root sense, Booth proposes that the ethical critic will be interested in any effect on the ethos, the total character or quality of tellers and listeners. Ethical criticism will risk talking about the quality of _this_ particular encounter with _this_ particular work. Yet (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  32
    Aristotelian Aporetic Ontology in Islamic and Christian Thinkers.Edward Booth - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a ground-breaking study of the consequences of a central problem in Aristotle's Metaphysics in the interpretation given to it by Islamic and Christian Aristotelian philosophers: the relationship between individuals as individuals, and individuals as instances of a universal. Father Booth begins from an examination of the factors causing the aporia in the centre of Aristotle's ontology, going on to elaborate the way in which it occurred sometimes with confused reactions among the Greek, Syrian and Arab commentators, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  18
    Kenneth Burke's Way of Knowing.Wayne C. Booth - 1974 - Critical Inquiry 1 (1):1-22.
    Kenneth Burke is, at long last, beginning to get the attention he de- serves. Among anthropologists, sociologists, psychologists, and rhetori- cians his "dramatism" is increasingly recognized as something that must at least appear in one's index, whether one has troubled to understand him or not. Even literary critics are beginning to see him as not just one more "new critic" but as someone who tried to lead a revolt against "narrow formalism" long before the currently fashionable explosion into the "extrinsic" (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  12
    M. H. Abrams: Historian as Critic, Critic as Pluralist.Wayne C. Booth - 1976 - Critical Inquiry 2 (3):411-445.
    When M. H. Abrams published a defense, in 1972, of "theorizing about the arts,"1 some of his critics accused him, of falling into subjectivism. He had made his case so forcefully against "the confrontation model of aesthetic criticism," and so effectively argued against "simplified" and "invariable" models of the art work and of "the function of criticism," that some readers thought he had thrown overboard the very possibility of a rational criticism tested by objective criteria. In his recent reply to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  17
    A General Family of Preferential Belief Removal Operators.Richard Booth, Thomas Meyer & Chattrakul Sombattheera - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (4):711 - 733.
    Most belief change operators in the AGM tradition assume an underlying plausibility ordering over the possible worlds which is transitive and complete. A unifying structure for these operators, based on supplementing the plausibility ordering with a second, guiding, relation over the worlds was presented in Booth et al. (Artif Intell 174:1339-1368, 2010). However it is not always reasonable to assume completeness of the underlying ordering. In this paper we generalise the structure of Booth et al. (Artif Intell 174: (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  12
    The Writing of Organic Fiction: A Conversation.Wright Morris & Wayne C. Booth - 1976 - Critical Inquiry 3 (2):387-404.
    MORRIS: But come back to that other kind of fiction, in which the author himself is involved with his works, not merely in writing something for other people but in writing what seems to be necessary to his conscious existence, to his sense of well-being. For such a writer, when he finished with something he finishes with it; he is not left with continuations that he can go on knitting until he runs out of yarn. This conceit reflects my own (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  9
    Pluralism in the Classroom.Wayne C. Booth - 1986 - Critical Inquiry 12 (3):468-479.
    At my university we never stop reforming the curriculum, and we’re now discussing the plurality of ways in which our students fulfill our requirement of a full year of “freshman humanities.” Some of us feel that we now provide too many ways: neither students nor faculty members can make a good defense of a requirement—in itself an expression of power, if you will—that leads to scant sharing of readings or subject matters for the students, and to no goals or methods (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  7
    Irony and Pity Once Again: "Thaïs" Revisited.Wayne C. Booth - 1975 - Critical Inquiry 2 (2):327-344.
    Mad about it they still were, in 1926, when Hemingway's splendid spoofing appeared in The Sun Also Rises. But it was not everybody who had been responsible. It was mainly Anatole France, abetted by his almost unanimously enthusiastic critics. And of all his works, the one that must have seemed to fit the formula best was Thaïs, already a quarter of a century old when Jake Barnes learned of irony and pity. It is not a bad formula for the effect (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  6
    "Preserving the Exemplar": Or, How Not to Dig Our Own Graves.Wayne C. Booth - 1977 - Critical Inquiry 3 (3):407-423.
    At first thought, our question of the day seems to be "about the text itself." Is there, in all texts, or at least in some texts, what Abrams calls "a core of determinate meanings," "the central core of what they [the authors] undertook to communicate"? Miller has seemed to find in the texts of Nietzsche a claim that there is not, that "the same text authorizes innumerable interpretations: There is no 'correct' interpretation. . . . reading is never the objective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  4
    Reply to Richard Berrong.Wayne C. Booth - 1985 - Critical Inquiry 11 (4):697-701.
    At first I thought Richard Berrong’s claim was only that I had misread Rabelais. My main point was not about Rabelais but about how, in general, we might deal with sexist classics. But it remains true that if Berrong has caught me misreading—and then condemning—“bits” torn from their context, I have violated my own professed standards. He and I both see Rabelais as a very great author, and we both hope to avoid the pointlessness of judging works, great or small, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Kant and Political Philosophy: The Contemporary Legacy.Ronald Beiner & William James Booth (eds.) - 1996 - Yale University Press.
    In recent years there has been a major revival of interest in the political philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Thinkers have looked to Kant's theories about knowledge, history, the moral self and autonomy, and nature and aesthetics to seek the foundations of their own political philosophy. This volume, written by established authorities on Kant as well as by new scholars in the field, illuminates the ways in which contemporary thinkers differ regarding Kantian philosophy and Kant's legacy to political and ethical theory. (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader.Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young - 2005 - Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James Phelan, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. My Many Selves: The Quest for a Plausible Harmony.Wayne C. Booth - 2006 - Utah State University Press.
    In his autobiography, _My Many Selves,_ Wayne C. Booth is less concerned with his professional achievements---though the book by no means ignores his distinguished career---than with the personal vision that emerges from a long life lived thoughtfully. For Booth, even the autobiographical process becomes part of a quest to harmonize the diverse, often conflicting aspects of who he was. To see himself clearly and whole, he broke the self down, personified the fragments, uncovered their roots in his experience (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. All Things Considered Duties to Believe.Anthony Robert Booth - 2012 - Synthese 187 (2):509-517.
    To be a doxastic deontologist is to claim that there is such a thing as an ethics of belief (or of our doxastic attitudes in general). In other words, that we are subject to certain duties with respect to our doxastic attitudes, the non-compliance with which makes us blameworthy and that we should understand doxastic justification in terms of these duties. In this paper, I argue that these duties are our all things considered duties, and not our epistemic or moral (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  30. Why Responsible Belief is Blameless Belief.Anthony Booth & Rik Peels - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy 107 (5):257-265.
    What, according to proponents of doxastic deontologism, is responsible belief? In this paper, we examine two proposals. Firstly, that responsible belief is blameless belief (a position we call DDB) and, secondly, that responsible belief is praiseworthy belief (a position we call DDP). We consider whether recent arguments in favor of DDP, mostly those recently offered by Brian Weatherson, stand up to scrutiny and argue that they do not. Given other considerations in favor of DDP, we conclude that the deontologist should (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  31. Testosterone and Dominance in Men.Allan Mazur & Alan Booth - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):353-363.
    In men, high levels of endogenous testosterone (T) seem to encourage behavior intended to dominate other people. Sometimes dominant behavior is aggressive, its apparent intent being to inflict harm on another person, but often dominance is expressed nonaggressively. Sometimes dominant behavior takes the form of antisocial behavior, including rebellion against authority and law breaking. Measurement of T at a single point in time, presumably indicative of a man's basal T level, predicts many of these dominant or antisocial behaviors. T not (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  32. Compatibilism and Free Belief.Anthony Robert Booth - 2009 - Philosophical Papers 38 (1):1-12.
    Matthias Steup (Steup 2008) has recently argued that our doxastic attitudes are free by (i) drawing an analogy with compatibilism about freedom of action and (ii) denying that it is a necessary condition for believing at will that S's having an intention to believe that p can cause S to believe that p . In this paper, however, I argue that the strategies espoused in (i) and (ii) are incompatible.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33.  52
    Learning and Awareness.Ference Marton & S. A. Booth - 1997 - Lawrence Erlbaum.
    This book presents the psychological basis, methodology, and application of Marton's phenomenographic approach to the theory of learning.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  34. The Theory of Epistemic Justification and the Theory of Knowledge: A Divorce.Anthony Robert Booth - 2011 - Erkenntnis 75 (1):37-43.
    Richard Foley has suggested that the search for a good theory of epistemic justification and the analysis of knowledge should be conceived of as two distinct projects. However, he has not offered much support for this claim, beyond highlighting certain salutary consequences it might have. In this paper, I offer some further support for Foley’s claim by offering an argument and a way to conceive the claim in a way that makes it as plausible as its denial, and thus levelling (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35. Can There Be Epistemic Reasons for Action?Anthony Robert Booth - 2006 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 73 (1):133-144.
    In this paper I consider whether there can be such things as epistemic reasons for action. I consider three arguments to the contrary and argue that none are successful, being either somewhat question-begging or too strong by ruling out what most epistemologists think is a necessary feature of epistemic justification, namely the epistemic basing relation. I end by suggesting a "non-cognitivist" model of epistemic reasons that makes room for there being epistemic reasons for action and suggest that this model may (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  36.  86
    Why Banning Ethical Criticism is a Serious Mistake.Wayne C. Booth - 1998 - Philosophy and Literature 22 (2):366-393.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  37.  59
    A Motivational Turn for Environmental Ethics.Carol Booth - 2009 - Ethics and the Environment 14 (1):pp. 53-78.
    To contribute more effectively to conservation reform, environmental ethics needs a motivational turn, referenced to the best scientific information about motivation. I address the pivotal questions What actually motivates people to conserve nature? and What ought to motivate people to conserve nature? by proposing a framework for understanding motivations and developing motivationally relevant criteria for environmental ethics. The need for an adequate philosophy of psychology for moral philosophy, identified by Elizabeth Anscombe 50 years ago, remains. Only from a psychologically informed (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38. Doxastic Voluntarism and Self-Deception.Anthony R. Booth - 2007 - Disputatio 2 (22):115 - 130.
    Direct Doxastic Voluntarism — the notion that we have direct voluntary control over our beliefs — has widely been held to be false. There are, however, two ways to interpret the impossibility of our having doxastic control: as either a conceptual/ logical/metaphysical impossibility or as a psychological impossibility. In this paper I analyse the arguments for and against both types of claim and, in particular, evaluate the bearing that putative cases of self-deception have on the arguments in defence of voluntarism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. Hereditarily Finite Finsler Sets.David Booth - 1990 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):700-706.
  40. A New Argument for Pragmatism?Anthony Robert Booth - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (2):227-231.
    Shah, N. The Philosophical Quarterly, 56, 481–498 (2006) has defended evidentialism on the premise that only it (and not pragmatism) is consistent with both (a) the deliberative constraint on reasons and (b) the transparency feature of belief. I show, however, that the deliberative constraint on reasons is also problematic for evidentialism. I also suggest a way for pragmatism to be construed so as to make it consistent with both (a) and (b) and argue that a similar move is not available (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  41. Ties That Bind: Native American Beliefs as a Foundation for Environmental Consciousness.Annie L. Booth & Harvey L. Jacobs - 1990 - Environmental Ethics 12 (1):27-43.
    In this article we examine the specific contributions Native American thought can make to the ongoing search for a Western ecological consciousness. We begin with a review of the influence of Native American beliefs on the different branches of the modem environmental movement and some initial comparisons of Western and Native American ways of seeing. We then review Native American thought on the natural world, highlighting beliefs in the need for reciprocity and balance, the world as a living being, and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  22
    Households: On the Moral Architecture of the Economy.William James Booth - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
    INTRODUCTION A story has been passed down to us from some two millennia ago of a conversation between a wealthy Athenian estate owner, ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43. Phenomenology is Art, Not Psychological or Neural Science.David A. Booth - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):408-409.
    It is tough to relate visual perception or other achievements to physiological processing in the central nervous system. The diagrammatic, algebraic, and verbal pictures of how sights seem to Lehar do not advance understanding of how we manage to see what is in the world. There are well-known conceptual reasons why no such purely introspective approach can be productive.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Why Ethical Criticism Fell on Hard Times.Wayne C. Booth - 1988 - Ethics 98 (2):278-293.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. A Note on the Rational Closure of Knowledge Bases with Both Positive and Negative Knowledge.R. Booth & J. B. Paris - 1998 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 7 (2):165-190.
    The notion of the rational closure of a positive knowledge base K of conditional assertions | (standing for if then normally ) was first introduced by Lehmann (1989) and developed by Lehmann and Magidor (1992). Following those authors we would also argue that the rational closure is, in a strong sense, the minimal information, or simplest, rational consequence relation satisfying K. In practice, however, one might expect a knowledge base to consist not just of positive conditional assertions, | , but (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Deontology in Ethics and Epistemology.Anthony Robert Booth - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):530-545.
    Abstract: In this article, I consider some of the similarities and differences between deontologism in ethics and epistemology. In particular, I highlight two salient differences between them. I aim to show that by highlighting these differences we can see that epistemic deontologism does not imply epistemic internalism and that it is not a thesis primarily about epistemic permissibility . These differences are: (1) deontologism in epistemology has a quasi -teleological feature (not shared with moral deontologism) in that it does not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  44
    Relatives' Knowledge of Decision Making in Intensive Care.M. G. Booth - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):459-461.
    Background/Aim: The law on consent has changed in Scotland with the introduction of the Adults with Incapacity Act 2000. This Act introduces the concept of proxy consent in Scotland. Many patients in intensive care are unable to participate in the decision making process because of their illness and its treatment. It is normal practice to provide relatives with information on the patient’s condition, treatment, and prognosis as a substitute for discussion directly with the patient. The relatives of intensive care patients (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  38
    Assumptions Involved in the Third Man Argument.N. B. Booth - 1958 - Phronesis 3 (2):146-149.
  49.  87
    Money as Tool, Money as Resource: The Biology of Collecting Items for Their Own Sake.David A. Booth - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):180-181.
    Money does not stimulate receptors in mimicry of natural agonists; so, by definition, money is not a drug. Attractions of money other than to purchase goods and services could arise from instincts similar to hoarding in other species. Instinctual activities without evolutionary function include earning a billion and writing for BBS. (Published Online April 5 2006).
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  48
    Were Zeno's Arguments a Reply To Attacks Upon Parmenides?N. B. Booth - 1957 - Phronesis 2 (1):1-9.
1 — 50 / 1000