Results for 'Tim Hardin'

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  1. Living Within Limits: Ecology, Economics and Population Taboos.Garret Hardin, Avner de-Shalit & Tim Cooper - 1995 - Environmental Values 4 (1):91-94.
     
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  2.  40
    Top Executive Compensation: Equity or Excess? Implications for Regaining American Competitiveness. [REVIEW]Bruce Walters, Tim Hardin & James Schick - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (3):227 - 234.
    The debate over compensation packages for top executives is discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the decoupling of CEO pay and organizational performance. A contrast is drawn between firms that are owner-controlled and those that are manager-controlled. Owner-controlled firms tend to be more market-driven. In manager-controlled firms, however, ownership can become diluted to the point where decisions may not always be in the best interest of shareholders. The process of determining CEO compensation packages is examined, and special attention is given (...)
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  3. Trustworthiness* Russell Hardin.Russell Hardin - 1996 - Ethics 107 (1):26-42.
     
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  4.  63
    Garrett Hardin.Garrett Hardin - 2002 - In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 4--145.
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  5.  22
    Survival and Self‐Interest: Hardin's Case Against Altruism.Peter Singer & Garrett Hardin - 1978 - Hastings Center Report 8 (1):37.
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  6.  25
    Liberalism: Political and Economic*: Russell Hardin.Russell Hardin - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):121-144.
    Political liberalism began in the eighteenth century with the effort to establish a secular state in which religious differences would be tolerated. If religious views include universal principles to apply to all by force if necessary, diverse religions must conflict, perhaps fatally. In a sense, then, political liberalism was an invention to resolve a then current, awful problem. Its proponents were articulate and finally persuasive. There have been many comparable social inventions, many of which have failed, as Communism, egalitarianism, and (...)
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  7.  81
    Color for Philosophers: Unweaving the Rainbow.Color and Color Perception: A Study in Anthropocentric Realism.Clyde L. Hardin - 1988 - Hackett.
    This expanded edition of C L Hardin's ground-breaking work on colour features a new chapter, 'Further Thoughts: 1993', in which the author revisits the dispute ...
  8. Color for Philosophers: Unweaving the Rainbow.C. L. Hardin - 1988 - Hackett.
    This expanded edition of C L Hardin's ground-breaking work on colour features a new chapter, 'Further Thoughts: 1993', in which the author revisits the dispute ...
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  9.  38
    Morality Within the Limits of Reason.Russell Hardin - 1988 - University of Chicago Press.
    Hardin demonstrates that many of these structural issues can and should be distinguished from the thornier problems of utilitarian value theory, and he is able ...
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  10.  13
    One for All: The Logic of Group Conflict.Russell Hardin - 1995 - Princeton University Press.
    In a book that challenges the most widely held ideas of why individuals engage in collective conflict, Russell Hardin offers a timely, crucial explanation of group action in its most destructive forms. Contrary to those observers who attribute group violence to irrationality, primordial instinct, or complex psychology, Hardin uncovers a systematic exploitation of self-interest in the underpinnings of group identification and collective violence. Using examples from Mafia vendettas to ethnic violence in places such as Bosnia and Rwanda, he (...)
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  11.  11
    How Do You Know?: The Economics of Ordinary Knowledge.Russell Hardin - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    Hardin presents an essentially economic account of what an individual can come to know and then applies this account to many areas of ordinary life: political participation, religious beliefs, popular knowledge of science, liberalism, ...
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  12.  4
    Indeterminacy and Society.Russell Hardin - 2005 - Princeton University Press.
    In simple action theory, when people choose between courses of action, they know what the outcome will be. When an individual is making a choice "against nature," such as switching on a light, that assumption may hold true. But in strategic interaction outcomes, indeterminacy is pervasive and often intractable. Whether one is choosing for oneself or making a choice about a policy matter, it is usually possible only to make a guess about the outcome, one based on anticipating what other (...)
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  13. Living Within Limits: Ecology, Economics, and Population Taboos.Garrett Hardin - 1995 - Oup Usa.
    This book tackles the problem of overpopulation with an honesty and fearlessness that is unrivalled. Hardin suggests radical approaches to overpopulation and considers the consequences. This book is an intellectual feast that will enrage, disturb, and challenge the reader at every page.
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  14.  50
    Norms and Games.Russell Hardin - 2008 - Philosophy of Science 75 (5):843-849.
    There are three centrally important ways in which norms have been elaborated and explained: in terms of religious or natural law strictures on behavior, in terms of constraints imposed by rationality, and, recently, in terms of agents' behavior in well‐defined games. The principal difficulty of a gaming account of norms is to show how the account explains motivations of individuals to follow the norms. This issue is examined in the context of small‐number norms and large‐number norms. †To contact the author, (...)
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  15.  44
    International Deontology.Russell Hardin - 1995 - Ethics and International Affairs 9:133–145.
    Hardin discusses the forms that moral reasoning might take—from rationalist actor theory to Kantian proceduralism to ad hoc Kantianism—and the relation of Kant's dictum to the institutional nature of much of international affairs.
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  16. In Defense of Convergent Realism.Clyde L. Hardin & Alexander Rosenberg - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 49 (4):604-615.
    Many realists have maintained that the success of scientific theories can be explained only if they may be regarded as approximately true. Laurens Laudan has in turn contended that a necessary condition for a theory's being approximately true is that its central terms refer, and since many successful theories of the past have employed central terms which we now understand to be non-referential, realism cannot explain their success. The present paper argues that a realist can adopt a view of reference (...)
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  17. True Colours.Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin - 2006 - Analysis 66 (4):335-340.
    (Tye 2006) presents us with the following scenario: John and Jane are both stan- dard human visual perceivers (according to the Ishihara test or the Farnsworth test, for example) viewing the same surface of Munsell chip 527 in standard conditions of visual observation. The surface of the chip looks “true blue” to John (i.e., it looks blue not tinged with any other colour to John), and blue tinged with green to Jane.1 Tye then in effect poses a multiple choice question.
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  18.  64
    Are Scientific Objects Colored?C. L. Hardin - 1984 - Mind 93 (October):491-500.
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  19.  34
    David Hume: Moral and Political Theorist.Russell Hardin - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Hume's place in history -- Moral psychology -- Strategic analysis -- Convention -- Political theory -- Justice as order -- Utilitarianism -- Value theory -- Retrospective.
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  20.  90
    Trustworthiness.Russell Hardin - 1996 - Ethics 107 (1):26-42.
  21.  63
    A Green Thought in a Green Shade.C. L. Hardin - 2004 - Harvard Review of Philosophy 12 (1):29-39.
  22. The Truth About 'the Truth About True Blue'.Jonathan Cohen, C. L. Hardin & Brian P. McLaughlin - 2007 - Analysis 67 (2):162–166.
    It can happen that a single surface S, viewed in normal conditions, looks pure blue (“true blue”) to observer John but looks blue tinged with green to a second observer, Jane, even though both are normal in the sense that they pass the standard psychophysical tests for color vision. Tye (2006a) finds this situation prima facie puzzling, and then offers two different “solutions” to the puzzle.1 The first is that at least one observer misrepresents S’s color because, though normal in (...)
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  23.  74
    Street-Level Epistemology and Democratic Participation.Russell Hardin - 2002 - Journal of Political Philosophy 10 (2):212–229.
  24. Qualia and Materialism: Closing the Explanatory Gap.Clyde L. Hardin - 1987 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 48 (December):281-98.
  25.  40
    The Virtues of Illusion.C. L. Hardin - 1992 - Philosophical Studies 68 (3):371--382.
    What ecological advantages do animals gain by being able to detect, extract and exploit wavelength information? What are the advantages of representing that information as hue qualities? The benefits of adding chromatic to achromatic vision, marginal in object detection, become apparent in object recognition and receiving biological signals. It is argued that this improved performance is a direct consequence of the fact that many animals' visual systems reduce wavelength information to combinations of four basic hues. This engenders a simple categorical (...)
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  26.  62
    Established Theories.Fritz Rohrlich & Larry Hardin - 1983 - Philosophy of Science 50 (4):603-617.
    Criteria are given to characterize mature theories in contradistinction to developing theories. We lean heavily on the physical sciences. An established theory is defined as a mature one with known validity limits. The approximate truth of such theories is thereby given a quantitative character. Superseding theories do not falsify established theories because the latter are protected by their validity limits. This view of scientific realism leads to ontological levels and cumulativity of knowledge. It is applied to a defense of realism (...)
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  27.  62
    Colors, Normal Observers and Standard Conditions.Clyde L. Hardin - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy 80 (December):806-13.
  28. Phenomenal Colors and Sorites.C. L. Hardin - 1988 - Noûs 22 (2):213-34.
  29.  27
    Reinverting the Spectrum.C. L. Hardin - 1997 - In Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert (eds.), Readings on Color, Volume 1: The Philosophy of Color. MIT Press. pp. 5--99.
  30. Color and Illusion.C. L. Hardin - 1990 - In William G. Lycan (ed.), Mind and Cognition. Blackwell.
  31.  35
    Color Relations and the Power of Complexity.C. L. Hardin - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):953-954.
    Color -order systems highlight certain features of color phenomenology while neglecting others. It is misleading to speak as if there were a single “psychological color space” that might be described by a rather simple formal structure. Criticisms of functionalism based on multiple realizations of a too-simple formal description of chromatic pheno-menal relations thus miss the mark. It is quite implausible that a functional system representing the full complexity of human color phenomenology should be realizable by radically different qualitative states.
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  32. Infinite Regress and Arrow's Theorem.Russell Hardin - 1980 - Ethics 90 (3):383-390.
  33.  94
    The Free Rider Problem.Russell Hardin - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  34.  31
    Discourse Analysis and the Epidemiology of Meaning.David Allen & Pamela K. Hardin - 2001 - Nursing Philosophy 2 (2):163-176.
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  35.  54
    Discriminating Altruisms.Garrett Hardin - 1982 - Zygon 17 (2):163-186.
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  36.  39
    Churchland's Metamers.Rolf G. Kuehni & C. L. Hardin - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):81-92.
    Paul Churchland proposed a conceptual framework for translating reflectance profiles into a space he takes to be the color qualia space. It allows him to determine color metamers of spectral surface reflectances without reference to the characteristics of visual systems, claiming that the reflectance classes that it specifies correspond to visually determined metamers. We advance several objections to his method, show that a significant number of reflectance profiles are not placed into the space in agreement with the qualia solid, and (...)
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  37.  10
    Reply to Levine.C. L. Hardin - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (1):41-50.
  38. Comment on Formal Decision Theory and Majority Rule.Russell Hardin - 1982 - Ethics 92 (2):207-210.
  39. Civil Liberties in the Era of Mass Terrorism.Russell Hardin - 2004 - The Journal of Ethics 8 (1):77-95.
    This paper discusses the impact of the so-called war on terrorism on civil liberties. The United States government in Madison’s plan was to be distrusted and hemmed in to protect citizens against it. The terrorist attacks of 2001 have seemingly licensed the US government to violate its Madisonian principles. While the current government asks for citizen trust, its actions justify distrust. The courts, which normally are the chief defenders of civil liberties, typically acquiesce in administration policies during emergencies, and it (...)
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  40.  65
    From Bodo Ethics to Distributive Justice.Russell Hardin - 1999 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (4):399-413.
    Concern with material equality as the central form of distributive justice is a very modern idea. Distributive justice for Aristotle and many other writers for millennia after him was a matter of distributing what each ought to get from merit or desert in some sense. Many, such as Hume, thought material equality a pernicious idea. In the medieval village life of Bodo, villagers knew enough about each other to govern relations through norms, including, when necessary, a norm of charity. In (...)
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  41.  62
    The Morality of Law and Economics.Russell Hardin - 1992 - Law and Philosophy 11 (4):331 - 384.
    The moral heart of normative law and economics is efficiency, especially dynamic efficiency that takes incentive effects into account. In the economic theory, justificatory argument is inherently at the institutional- or rule-level, not an the individual- or case-level. InMarkets, Morals, and the Law Jules Coleman argues against the efficiency theory on normative grounds. Although he strongly asserts the need to view law institutionally, he frequently grounds his criticisms of law and economics in arguments from little more than direct moral intuition (...)
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  42.  95
    Physiology, Phenomenology, and Spinoza's True Colors.C. L. Hardin - 1992 - In Ansgar Beckermann, Hans Flohr & Jaegwon Kim (eds.), Emergence or Reduction?: Prospects for Nonreductive Physicalism. De Gruyter.
  43.  28
    The Utilitarian Logic of Liberalism.Russell Hardin - 1986 - Ethics 97 (1):47-74.
  44.  30
    Van Brakel and the Not-so-Naked Emperor.Clyde L. Hardin - 1993 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (1):137-50.
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  45.  38
    Representing Ignorance.Russell Hardin - 2004 - Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (1):76-99.
    If we wish to assess the morality of elected officials, we must understand their function as our representatives and then infer how they can fulfill this function. I propose to treat the class of elected officials as a profession, so that their morality is a role morality and it is functionally determined. If we conceive the role morality of legislators to be analogous to the ethics of other professions, then this morality must be functionally defined by the purpose that legislators (...)
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  46.  27
    Bargaining for Justice.Russell Hardin - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):65.
    David Gauthier's Morals by Agreement presents a partial theory of distributive justice. It is partial because it applies only to the distribution of gains from joint endeavors, or what we may call the ‘social surplus’ from cooperation. This surplus is the benefit we receive from cooperation insofar as this is greater than what we might have produced through individual efforts without interaction with others. The central core of Gauthier's theory of distributive justice is his bargaining theory of ‘minimax relative concession’ (...)
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  47.  34
    From Power to Order, From Hobbes to Hume.Russell Hardin - 1993 - Journal of Political Philosophy 1 (1):69-81.
  48.  39
    Democratic Epistemology and Accountability.Russell Hardin - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (1):110.
    Most of the knowledge of an ordinary person has a very messy structure and cannot meet standard epistemological criteria for its justification. Rather, a street-level epistemology makes sense of ordinary knowledge. Street-level epistemology is a subjective account of knowledge, not a public account. It is not about what counts as knowledge in, say, physics, but deals rather, with your knowledge, my knowledge, the ordinary person's knowledge. I wish not to elaborate this view here, but to apply it to the problems (...)
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  49. Introduction.Russell Hardin & John J. Mearsheimer - 1985 - Ethics 95 (3):411-423.
  50. Nature and Man's Fate.Garrett James Hardin - 1959 - New York: Rinehart.
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