11 found
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  1. The agents of justice.Colin Hickey, Tim Meijers, Ingrid Robeyns & Dick Timmer - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16.
    The complexities of how justice comes to be realized, and by which agents, is a relatively neglected element in contemporary theories of justice. This has left several crucial questions about agency and justice undertheorized, such as why some particular agents are responsible for realizing justice, how their contribution towards realizing justice should be understood, and what role agents such as activists and community leaders play in realizing justice. We aim to contribute towards a better understanding of the landscape of these (...)
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  2.  22
    The Value in Procreation: A Pro-tanto Case for a Limited and Conditional Right to Procreate.Tim Meijers - 2020 - Journal of Value Inquiry 54 (4):627-647.
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  3.  25
    Equality, value pluralism and relevance: Is luck egalitarianism in one way good, but not all things considered?Tim Meijers & Pierre-Etienne Vandamme - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 22 (3):318-334.
  4.  83
    Firms and parental justice: should firms contribute to the cost of parenthood and procreation?Sandrine Blanc & Tim Meijers - 2020 - Economics and Philosophy 36 (1):1-27.
    This article asks whether firms should contribute to the costs of procreation and parenthood. We explore two sets of arguments. First, we ask what the principle of fair play – central in parental justice debates – implies. We argue that if one defends a pro-sharing view, firms are required to shoulder part of the costs of procreation and parenthood. Second, we turn to the principle of fair equality of opportunity. We argue that compensating firms for costs they incur because their (...)
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  5.  46
    Citizens in appropriate numbers: evaluating five claims about justice and population size.Tim Meijers - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (2-3):246-268.
    While different worries about population size are present in public debates, political philosophers often take population size as given. This paper is an attempt to formulate a Rawlsian liberal egalitarian approach to population size: does it make sense to speak of ‘too few’ or ‘too many’ people from the point of view of justice? It argues that, drawing on key features of liberal egalitarian theory, several clear constraints on demographic developments – to the extent that they are under our control (...)
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  6.  52
    Equality, responsibility, and justice.David V. Axelsen, Juliana Bidadanure & Tim Meijers - 2019 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 22 (3):237-244.
  7.  25
    Climate Change and Intergenerational Justice.Tim Meijers - 2023 - In Pellegrino Gianfranco & Marcello Di Paola (eds.), Handbook of Philosophy of Climate Change. Springer Nature. pp. 623-645.
    This chapter provides an overview of the kind of questions one has to answer to take position on the question of who owes what to future generations in the context of climate change and discusses several possible answers as well as their upsides and downsides. It first asks whether we have duties of justice to future at all, raising several challenges to the idea of including future generations under the scope of justice. Second, it asks how much we owe to (...)
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  8.  22
    Zipper arguments and duties regarding future generations.Tim Meijers - 2024 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 23 (2):181-204.
    Most of us believe that it would be unjust to act with indifference about the plight of future generations. Zipper arguments in intergenerational justice aim to show that we have duties of justice regarding future generations, regardless of whether we have duties of justice to future generations. By doing so, such arguments circumvent the foundational challenges that come with theorising duties to remote future generations, which result from the non-existence, non-identity and non-contemporaneity of future generations. I argue that zipper arguments (...)
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  9.  20
    Migrants by plane and migrants by stork: can we refuse citizenship to one, but not the other?Tim Meijers - 2022 - Ethics and Global Politics 15 (3):69-90.
    States combine the routine refusal of citizenship to migrants with policies that grant newborns of citizens (or residents) full membership of society without questions asked. This paper asks what, if anything, can justify this differential treatment of the two types of newcomers. It explores arguments for differential treatment based on the differential environmental impact, different impact on the (political) culture of the society in question and differences between the positions of the newcomers themselves. I conclude that, although some justification for (...)
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  10.  20
    Samuel Scheffler, Why Worry About Future Generations? (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018), pp. viii + 146.Tim Meijers & Angelieke L. Wolters - 2020 - Utilitas 32 (4):496-499.
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  11.  24
    Trials as Messages of Justice: What Should Be Expected of International Criminal Courts?Tim Meijers & Marlies Glasius - 2016 - Ethics and International Affairs 30 (4):429-447.
    This article addresses the question what—if anything—we can and should expect from the practice of international criminal justice. It argues that neither retributive nor purely consequentialist, deterrence-based justifications give sufficient guidance as to what international criminal courts should aim to achieve. Instead, the legal theory of expressivism provides a more viable guide. Contrary to other expressivist views, this article argues for the importance of the trial, not just the punishment, as a form of expressivist messaging. Specifically, we emphasize the communicative (...)
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