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Tim Valentine [12]Timothy Valentine [1]
  1.  24
    Orientation of attention to nonconsciously recognised famous faces.Anna Stone & Tim Valentine - 2005 - Cognition and Emotion 19 (4):537-558.
    The nonconscious orientation of attention to famous faces was investigated using masked 17 ms stimulus exposure. Each trial presented a simultaneous pair of one famous and one unfamiliar face, matched on physical characteristics, one each in left visual field (LVF) and right visual field (RVF). These were followed by a dot probe in either LVF or RVF to which participants made a speeded two-alternative forced-choice discrimination response. Participants subsequently evaluated the affective valence (good/evil) of the famous persons on a 7-point (...)
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  2. Face recognition and emotional Valence: Processing without awareness by neurologically intact participants does not simulate Covert recognition in prosopagnosia.Anna Stone, Tim Valentine & Rob Davis - 2001 - Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 1 (2):183-191.
  3.  17
    The categorical structure of semantic memory for famous people: a new approach using release from proactive interference.Stephen Darling & Tim Valentine - 2005 - Cognition 96 (1):35-65.
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  4.  28
    Strength of visual percept generated by famous faces perceived without awareness: Effects of affective valence, response latency, and visual field☆.Anna Stone & Tim Valentine - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):548-564.
    Participants who were unable to detect familiarity from masked 17 ms faces did report a vague, partial visual percept. Two experiments investigated the relative strength of the visual percept generated by famous and unfamiliar faces, using masked 17 ms exposure. Each trial presented simultaneously a famous and an unfamiliar face, one face in LVF and the other in RVF. In one task, participants responded according to which of the faces generated the stronger visual percept, and in the other task, they (...)
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  5.  12
    From Monroe to Moreau: An analysis of face naming errors.Serge Brédart & Tim Valentine - 1992 - Cognition 45 (3):187-223.
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  6.  9
    Action experience alters 3-month-old infants' perception of others' actions. [REVIEW]Stephen Darling, Tim Valentine, Stephen R. Mitroff, Brian J. Scholl, Karen Wynn, Jessica A. Sommerville, Amanda L. Woodward, Amy Needham, Jyrki Tuomainen & Tobias S. Andersen - 2005 - Cognition 96 (1):B1-B11.
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  7. Age-of-acquisition and cumulative frequency have independent effects.Viv Moore, Tim Valentine & Judy Turner - 1999 - Cognition 72 (3):305-309.
     
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  8. B11±b21.Viv Moore, Tim Valentine, Judy Turner & Michael B. Lewis - 1999 - Cognition 72 (317):317-318.
     
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  9. Angry and happy faces perceived without awareness: A comparison with the affective impact of masked famous faces.Anna Stone & Tim Valentine - 2007 - European Journal of Cognitive Psychology 19 (2):161-186.
  10.  24
    Accuracy of familiarity decisions to famous faces perceived without awareness depends on attitude to the target person and on response latency.Anna Stone & Tim Valentine - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):351-376.
    Stone and Valentine presented masked 17 ms faces in simultaneous pairs of one famous and one unfamiliar face. Accuracy in selecting the famous face was higher when the famous person was regarded as “good” or liked than when regarded as “evil” or disliked. Experiment 1 attempted to replicate this phenomenon, but produced a different pattern of results. Experiment 2 investigated alternative explanations and found evidence supporting only the effect of response latency: responses made soon after stimulus onset were more accurate (...)
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  11. The nominal competitor effect: When one name is better than two.Tim Valentine, Jarrod Hollis & Viv Moore - 1999 - In Martin Hahn & S. C. Stoness (eds.), Proceedings of the 21st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 749--754.
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  12. Sandro Rubichi, Federico Ricci, Roberto Padovani, and Lorenzo Scaglietti. Hypnotic susceptibility, baseline attentional.René Zeelenberg, Inge Boot, Diane Pecher, P. Andrew Leynes, Joshua Landau, Jessica Walker, Richard J. Addante, Anna M. Stone, Tim Valentine & Rafaële J. C. Huntjens - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14:231-232.
  13.  8
    Philosophy of Education. [REVIEW]Timothy Valentine - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):109-112.
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