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  1.  89
    Ineffability Investigations: What the Later Wittgenstein has to Offer to the Study of Ineffability.Timothy D. Knepper - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (2):65-76.
    While a considerable amount of effort has been expended in an attempt to understand Ludwig Wittgenstein’s enigmatic comments about silence and the mystical at the end of Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus , very little attention has been paid to the implications of Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations for the study of ineffability. This paper first argues that, since Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations problematizes private language, emphasizes the description of actual language use, and recognizes the rule-governed nature of language, it contains significant implications for the study (...)
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  2.  32
    Mélanie V. Walton: Expressing the Inexpressible in Lyotard and Pseudo-Dionysius: Bearing Witness as Spiritual Exercise: Lexington Books, Lanham, 2013, 326 Pp., $100.Timothy D. Knepper - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (2):191-194.
    All too often, the study of ineffability only looks on the bright side of life—mystical experiences of blissful unity, primordial grounds of overflowing fecundity, noetic truths of existential profundity. To some extent, this is true too for Mélanie V. Walton’s Expressing the Inexpressible in Lyotard and Pseudo-Dionysius: Bearing Witness as Spiritual Exercise, which turns to a “desperate love letter to God” —the eros-infused naming and unnaming of God in The Divine Names, a treatise by the sixth-century Neoplatonic-Christian Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite—for (...)
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  3.  16
    Not Not: The Method and Logic of Dionysian Negation.Timothy D. Knepper - 2008 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 82 (4):619-637.
    This paper examines the basic differences between Dionysius’s two principal terms for negation, aphairesis and apophasis, expounding most of the passagesin which these terms appear in order to support the claim that aphairesis functions as Dionysius’s method of hymning the hyper-being God through the removal of“beings” (by means of narrow-scope predicate-term negation), while apophasis constitutes Dionysius’s logic of interpreting these removed beings excessively rather than privatively. It then argues that, although aphairesis “removes” and apophasis “exceeds,” these two types of negation (...)
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  4.  10
    Techniques and Rules of Ineffability in the Dionysian Corpus.Timothy D. Knepper - 2014 - Studia Humana 3 (2):3-31.
    Is the Dionysian God, or an experience of the Dionysian God, absolutely ineffable? Does the Dionysian corpus assert or perform such ineffability? This paper will argue that the answer to each of these questions is no. The Dionysian God is known hyper-nous as the hyper-ousia cause of all. And the Dionysian corpus unambiguously refers to, asserts of, and metaphorizes about this God just so. In arguing these points, this paper will call upon both the speech act theory of John Searle (...)
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  5.  46
    Three Misuses of Dionysius for Comparative Theology.Timothy D. Knepper - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (2):205-221.
    In his 2000 Religious Studies article 'Ineffability', John Hick calls upon the Dionysian corpus to bear witness to the 'transcategorality' of God and thereby corroborate his comparative theology of pluralism. Hick's Dionysius avows God's transcendence of categories by negating God's names, while at the same time maintaining that such names are metaphorically useful means of uplifting humans to God. But herein reside three common misunderstandings of the Dionysian corpus: (1) the divine names are mere metaphors; (2) the divine names are (...)
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  6.  38
    What’s in the Names: Philosophy of Religion as Religious Philosophy, Theology as Multidisciplinary Comparative Inquiry Into Ultimate Matters. [REVIEW]Timothy D. Knepper - 2012 - Sophia 51 (2):299-302.