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Tim Crowley
University College Dublin
  1. On the Use of Stoicheion in the Sense of 'Element'.Timothy J. Crowley - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 29:367-394.
  2.  4
    On the “Perceptible Bodies” at De Generatione Et Corruptione II.1.Timothy J. Crowley - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 27:1-26.
    Near the beginning of _De Gen. et Cor. _II.1, Aristotle claims that the generation and corruption of all naturally constituted substances are “not without the perceptible bodies”. It is not clear what he intends by this. In this paper I offer a new interpretation of this assertion. I argue that the assumption behind the usual reading, namely, that these “perceptible bodies” ought to be distinguished from the naturally constituted substances, is flawed, and that the assertion is best understood as a (...)
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  3.  61
    De Generatione Et Corruptione 2.3: Does Aristotle Identify The Contraries As Elements?Timothy J. Crowley - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):161-182.
    It might seem quite commonplace to say that Aristotle identifies fire, air, water and earth as the στοιχεῖα, or ‘elements’ – or, to be more precise, as the elements of bodies that are subject to generation and corruption. Yet there is a tradition of interpretation, already evident in the work of the sixth-century commentator John Philoponus and widespread, indeed prevalent, today, according to which Aristotle does not really believe that fire, air, water and earth are truly elemental. The basic premise (...)
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  4. In the Grip of Disease: Studies in the Greek Imagination. [REVIEW]Timothy J. Crowley - 2004 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (4):508.
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  5. On the Use of Stoicheion in the Sense of 'Element'.Timothy J. Crowley - 2005 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxix: Winter 2005. Oxford University Press.
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