Results for 'Timothy O���Connor'

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  1.  5
    Timothy O’Connor on Contingency: A Review Essay on Theism and Ultimate Explanation.William Lane Craig - 2010 - Philosophia Christi 12 (1):181-188.
    In the first part of Theism and Ultimate Explanation Timothy O’Connor provides a compact survey of the metaphysics and epistemology of modality, defending modal realism and a priorism. In the book’s second half he defends a Leibnizian-style cosmological argument for an absolutely necessary being. He seeks to answer four questions: Is the idea of a necessary being coherent? In what way is the postulation of such a being explanatory? Does the assumption of necessary being commit us to denying the (...)
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  2.  33
    Timothy O'Connor, Persons & Causes: The Metaphysics of Free Will. Oxford & New York: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. Xv and 135. $35.00.Andrei Buckareff - 2003 - Auslegung 26 (1).
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  3. Timothy O'Connor and the Harmony Thesis: A Critique.James P. Moreland - 2002 - Metaphysica 3 (2):5-40.
  4.  11
    Timothy O'Connor and Constantine Sandis, Eds. , A Companion to the Philosophy of Action . Reviewed By.Sean Greenberg - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (6):504-506.
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  5.  28
    Timothy O'Connor, Persons and Causes (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000).Eric Hiddleston - 2005 - Noûs 39 (3):541–556.
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  6.  47
    Timothy O'Connor Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency . (Oxford: Blackwell, 2008). Pp. XIII+177. £40.00 (Hbk). Isbn 9781405169691. [REVIEW]T. J. Mawson - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (2):237-241.
  7. The Metaphysics of Emergence.Timothy O'Connor - 2005 - Noûs 39 (4):658-678.
    The objective probability of every physical event is fixed by prior physical events and laws alone. (This thesis is sometimes expressed in terms of explanation: In tracing the causal history of any physical event, one need not advert to any non-physical events or laws. To the extent that there is any explanation available for a physical event, there is a complete explanation available couched entirely in physical vocabulary. We prefer the probability formulation, as it should be acceptable to any physicalist, (...)
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  8.  5
    Timothy O'Connor: Persons and Causes.Stewart Goetz - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (1):116-119.
  9.  52
    Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency.Timothy O’Connor - 2010 - Philosophia Christi 12 (2):265-272.
    Twentieth-century analytic philosophy was dominated by positivist antimetaphysics and neo-Humean deflationary metaphysics, and the nature of explanation was reconceived in order to fit these agendas. Unsurprisingly, the explanatory value of theist was widely discredited. I argue that the long-overdue revival of moralized, broadly neo-Aristotelian metaphysics and an improved perspective on modal knowledge dramatically changes the landscape. In this enriched context, there is no sharp divide between physics and metaphysics, and the natural end of the theoretician’s quest for a unified explanation (...)
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  10. Freedom With a Human Face.Timothy O'Connor - 2005 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):207-227.
    As good a definition as any of a _philosophical_ conundrum is a problem all of whose possible solutions are unsatisfactory. The problem of understanding the springs of action for morally responsible agents is commonly recognized to be such a problem. The origin, nature, and explanation of freely-willed actions puzzle us today as they did the ancients Greeks, and for much the same reasons. However, one can carry this ‘perennial-puzzle’ sentiment too far. The unsatisfactory nature of philosophical theories is a more (...)
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  11. Persons and Causes: The Metaphysics of Free Will.Timothy O'Connor - 2000 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This provocative book refurbishes the traditional account of freedom of will as reasons-guided "agent" causation, situating its account within a general metaphysics. O'Connor's discussion of the general concept of causation and of ontological reductionism v. emergence will specially interest metaphysicians and philosophers of mind.
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  12. Causality, Mind, and Free Will.Timothy O'Connor - 2000 - Noûs 34 (s14):105-117.
    One familiar affirmative answer to this question holds that these facts suffice to entail that Descartes' picture of the human mind must be mistaken. On Descartes' view, our mind or soul (the only essential part of ourselves) has no spatial location. Yet it directly interacts with but one physical object, the brain of that body with which it is, 'as it were, intermingled,' so as to 'form one unit.' The radical disparity posited between a nonspatial mind, whose intentional and conscious (...)
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  13.  83
    Theism and Ultimate Explanation – Timothy O'Connor.Samuel Newlands - 2010 - Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):438-442.
    This is a book review of "Theism and Ultimate Explanation", by Timothy O'Connor.
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  14.  33
    Laura Frances Callahan and Timothy O’Connor : Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014, 333 Pp, £45.00. [REVIEW]Benjamin W. McCraw - 2015 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (3):281-285.
    Let me begin with what I take to be the two most significant features of this collection. First, it addresses an area that is woefully under-discussed: the intersection of virtue epistemology and philosophy of religion. Each is a massively influential and important field in its own right, so bringing the two into dialogue makes tremendous sense. This collection accomplishes much in this regard but also underscores the amount of work that needs to be developed. Bringing together virtue epistemology, philosophy of (...)
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  15.  27
    Laura Frances Callahan and Timothy O'Connor Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue. . Pp. Xii + 352. £45.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 967215 8. [REVIEW]Justin Mcbrayer & Doug Moore - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (1):131-135.
  16.  6
    Critical Notice: Timothy O'Connor, Persons and Causes.Eric Hiddleston - 2005 - Noûs 39 (3):541-56.
  17.  88
    Emergence and Reduction in Context: Philosophy of Science and/or Analytic Metaphysics: Jakob Hohwy and Jesper Kallestrup : Being Reduced: New Essays on Reduction, Explanation, and Causation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008, 312pp, $99.00 HB Mark A. Bedau and Paul Humphreys : Emergence: Contemporary Readings in Philosophy and Science. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2008, 464pp, $85.00 HB Antonella Corradini and Timothy O’Connor : Emergence in Science and Philosophy. London and NewYork: Routledge Studies in the Philosophy of Science, 2010, 314pp, $128.00 HB. [REVIEW]Michael Silberstein - 2012 - Metascience 21 (3):627-642.
    Emergence and reduction in context: Philosophy of science and/or analytic metaphysics Content Type Journal Article Category Survey Review Pages 1-16 DOI 10.1007/s11016-012-9671-4 Authors Michael Silberstein, Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA 17022, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  18.  5
    Laura Frances Callahan and Timothy O’Connor, Eds., Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue[REVIEW]Jeroen de Ridder - 2016 - Journal of Analytic Theology 4:409-415.
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  19.  72
    On the Transfer of Necessity.Timothy O'Connor - 1993 - Noûs 27 (2):204-18.
    Over the last several years, a number of philosophers have advanced formal versions of certain traditional arguments for the incompatibility of human freedom with causal determinism and for the incompatibility of human freedom with infallible divine foreknowledge. Common to all of these is some form of a principle governing the transfer of a species of alethic necessity (TPN). More recently, a few clear and compelling counterexamples to TNP (and a variant of it) have begun to surface in the literature. These (...)
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  20. Indeterminism and Free Agency: Three Recent Views.Timothy O'connor - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (3):499-26.
    It is a commonplace of philosophy that the notion of free will is a hard nut to crack. A simple, compelling argument can be made to show that behavior for which an agent is morally responsible cannot be the outcome of prior determining causal factors.1 Yet the smug satisfaction with which we incompatibilists are prone to trot out this argument has a tendency to turn to embarrassment when we're asked to explain just how it is that morally responsible action might (...)
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  21. Free Will.Timothy O'Connor & Christopher Evan Franklin - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    “Free Will” is a philosophical term of art for a particular sort of capacity of rational agents to choose a course of action from among various alternatives. Which sort is the free will sort is what all the fuss is about. (And what a fuss it has been: philosophers have debated this question for over two millenia, and just about every major philosopher has had something to say about it.) Most philosophers suppose that the concept of free will is very (...)
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  22. Emergent Properties.Timothy O' Connor - 1994 - American Philosophical Quarterly 31:91.
  23. Agent-Causal Theories.Timothy O'Connor - 2011 - In Robert Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Free Will: Second Edition. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 309-328.
    This essay will canvass recent philosophical discussion of accounts of human (free) agency that deploy a notion of agent causation . Historically, many accounts have only hinted at the nature of agent causation by way of contrast with the causality exhibited by impersonal physical systems. Likewise, the numerous criticisms of agent causal theories have tended to be highly general, often amounting to no more that the bare assertion that the idea of agent causation is obscure or mysterious. But in the (...)
     
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  24. Simplicity and Creation.Timothy O’Connor - 1999 - Faith and Philosophy 16 (3):405-412.
    According to many philosophical theologians, God is metaphysically simple: there is no real distinction among His attributes or even between attribute and existence itself. Here, I consider only one argument against the simplicity thesis. Its proponents claim that simplicity is incompatible with God’s having created another world, since simplicity entails that God is unchanging across possible worlds. For, they argue, different acts of creation involve different willings, which are distinct intrinsic states. I show that this is mistaken, by sketching an (...)
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  25.  52
    Thomas Reid on Free Agency.Timothy O'Connor - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (4):605-622.
    Reid takes it to be part of our commonsense view of ourselves that "we" -- "qua" enduring substances, not merely "qua" subjects of efficacious mental states -- are often the immediate causes of our own volitions. Only if this conviction is veridical, Reid thinks, may we be properly held to be responsible for our actions (indeed, may we truly be said to "act" at all). This paper offers an interpretation of Reid's account of such agency (taking account of Rowe's recent (...)
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  26. Emergent Properties.Timothy O'Connor - 1994 - American Philosophical Quarterly 31 (2):91-104.
    All organised bodies are composed of parts, similar to those composing inorganic nature, and which have even themselves existed in an inorganic state; but the phenomena of life, which result from the juxtaposition of those parts in a certain manner, bear no analogy to any of the effects which would be produced by the action of the component substances considered as mere physical agents. To whatever degree we might imagine our knowledge of the properties of the several ingredients of a (...)
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  27.  90
    Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency.Timothy O'Connor - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    An expansive, yet succinct, analysis of the Philosophy of Religion – from metaphysics through theology. Organized into two sections, the text first examines truths concerning what is possible and what is necessary. These chapters lay the foundation for the book’s second part – the search for a metaphysical framework that permits the possibility of an ultimate explanation that is correct and complete. A cutting-edge scholarly work which engages with the traditional metaphysician’s quest for a true ultimate explanation of the most (...)
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  28. Probability and Freedom: A Reply to Vicens.Timothy O'Connor - 2016 - Res Philosophica 93 (1):289-293.
    I have argued elsewhere that human free action is governed by objective probabilities. This view, I suggested, is strongly supported by our experience of motivated decision-making and by our having emerged from probabilistically-governed physical causes. Leigh Vicens criticizes these arguments. She also argues that an account of human freedom as probabilisticallyunstructured indeterminacy is less vulnerable to challenges to the plausibility of libertarian views of freedom. In this article, I explain why I am not persuaded by Vicens’s arguments.
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  29. Agent Causation.Timothy O'Connor - 1995 - In Agents, Causes, and Events: Essays on Indeterminism and Free Will. Oxford University Press. pp. 61-79.
    In what follows, I will contend that the commonsense view of ourselves as fundamental causal agents - for which some have used the term “unmoved movers" but which I think might more accurately be expressed as “not wholly moved movers” - is theoretically understandable, internally consistent, and consistent with what we have thus far come to know about the nature and workings of the natural world. In the section that follows, I try to show how the concept of ‘agent’ causation (...)
     
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  30. And This All Men Call God.Timothy O’Connor - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (4):417-435.
    Philosophical discussion of theistic arguments mainly focus on their first (existence) stage, which argues for the existence of something having some very general, if suggestive, feature. I shall instead consider only the second (identification) stage of one such argument, the cosmologic al argument from contingency. Taking for granted the existence of an absolutely necessary being, I develop an extended line of argument that supports the..
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  31. Causing Actions.Georg Theiner & Timothy O’Connor - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):291-294.
    Review of Paul Pietroski, Causing Actions.
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  32. Agent-Causal Power.Timothy O'Connor - 2009 - In Toby Handfield (ed.), Dispositions and Causes. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.
    In what follows, I shall presuppose the ecumenical core of the causal powers metaphysics. The argument of this paper concerns what may appear at first to be a wholly unrelated matter, the metaphysics of free will. However, an adequate account of freedom requires, in my judgment, a notion of a distinctive variety of causal power, one which tradition dubs ‘agent-causal power’. I will first develop this notion and clarify its relationship to other notions. I will then respond to a number (...)
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  33. Agents, Causes, and Events: Essays on Indeterminism and Free Will.Timothy O'Connor (ed.) - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Many philosophers are persuaded by familiar arguments that free will is incompatible with causal determinism. Yet, notoriously, past attempts to articulate how the right type of indeterminism might secure the capacity for autonomous action have generally been regarded as either demonstrably inadequate or irremediably obscure. This volume gathers together the most significant recent discussions concerning the prospects for devising a satisfactory indeterministic account of freedom of action. These essays give greater precision to traditional formulations of the problems associated with indeterministic (...)
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  34.  83
    The Efficacy of Reasons: A Reply to Hendrickson.Timothy O'Connor - 2002 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):135-137.
    Noel Hendrickson, in “Against an Agent-Causal Theory of Action” (this volume), carefully and intelligently probes aspects of the agent-causal account of free will I present in Persons and Causes: The Metaphysics of Free Will. The central target of his criticism is my contention that agent-causal events, by their very nature, cannot be caused. Here, I respond to his argument on this point.
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  35. Review of Timothy O'Connor, Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency[REVIEW]Graham Oppy - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (6).
    This paper is a review of the cosmological argument that Tim O'Connor defends in "Theism and Ultimate Explanation".
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  36.  24
    Review of Paul Pietroski, Causing Actions. [REVIEW]Timothy O’Connor & Georg Theiner - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):291-294.
    The following assumptions are necessary to get the contemporary problem of mental causation off the ground.
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  37. Reasons Explanation And Agent Control: In Search Of An Integrated Account.Timothy O’Connor & John Ross Churchill - 2004 - Philosophical Topics 32 (1):241-256.
    Many philosophers judge that typical agent-causal accounts of freedom improperly sacrifice the possibility of rational explanation of the action for the sake of securing control, while others judge that the reverse shortcoming plagues typical event causal accounts. (Of course, many philosophers make both these judgments.) After briefly rehearsing the reasons for these verdicts on the two traditional strategies, we undertake an extended examination of Randolph Clarke's recent attempt to meet the challenge by proposing an original, "integrated agent-causal" account of human (...)
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  38. Agent Causation in a Neo-Aristotelian Metaphysics.Jonathan D. Jacobs & Timothy O'Connor - 2013 - In Sophie C. Gibb & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), Mental Causation and Ontology. Oxford University Press.
    Freedom and moral responsibility have one foot in the practical realm of human affairs and the other in the esoteric realm of fundamental metaphysics—or so we believe. This has been denied, especially in the metaphysics-bashing era occupying the first two-thirds or so of the twentieth century, traces of which linger in the present day. But the reasons for this denial seem to us quite implausible. Certainly, the argument for the general bankruptcy of metaphysics has been soundly discredited. Arguments from Strawson (...)
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  39. An Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism?Timothy O’Connor - 1994 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):527-539.
    In his recently published two-volume work in epistemology,1 Alvin Plantinga rounds out the discussion (in characteristic fashion) with a subtle and ingenious argument for a striking claim: in this case, his conclusion is that belief in evolutionary naturalism is irrational. Now this claim is not of itself so very surprising; the tantalizing feature here lies rather in the nature of the argument itself. Plantinga contends that taking seriously the hypothesis of evolutionary naturalism [hereafter, N&E] ought to undermine one's confidence in (...)
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  40.  96
    Emergence in Science and Philosophy * Edited by Antonella Corradini and Timothy O'Connor.W. Seager - 2012 - Analysis 72 (2):396-398.
  41.  69
    Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue.Laura Frances Callahan & Timothy O'Connor (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Is religious faith consistent with being an intellectually virtuous thinker? In seeking to answer this question, one quickly finds others, each of which has been the focus of recent renewed attention by epistemologists: What is it to be an intellectually virtuous thinker? Must all reasonable belief be grounded in public evidence? Under what circumstances is a person rationally justified in believing something on trust, on the testimony of another, or because of the conclusions drawn by an intellectual authority? Can it (...)
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  42. Emergent Individuals.Timothy O'Connor & Jonathan D. Jacobs - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):540-555.
    We explain the thesis that human mental states are ontologically emergent aspects of a fundamentally biological organism. We then explore the consequences of this thesis for the identity of a human person over time. As these consequences are not obviously independent of one's general ontology of objects and their properties, we consider four such accounts: transcendent universals, kind-Aristotelianism, immanent universals, and tropes. We suggest there are reasons for emergentists to favor the latter two accounts. We then argue that within such (...)
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  43. O'Connor, Timothy. Persons and Causes: The Metaphysics of Free Will.Paul Raymont - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):170-172.
  44.  10
    Is God’s Necessity Necessary?Timothy O’Connor - 2010 - Philosophia Christi 12 (2):309 - 316.
    I briefly defend the following claims in response to my critics: (1) We cannot make a principled division between features of contingent reality that do and features that don’t "cry our for explanation." (2) The physical data indicating fine-tuning provide confirmation of the hypothesis of a personal necessary cause of the universe over against an impersonal necessary cause, notwithstanding the fact that the probability of either hypothesis, if true, would be 1. (3) Theism that commits to God’s necessary existence makes (...)
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  45.  10
    Religious Faith and Intellectual Virtue. Edited by Laura Frances Callahan & Timothy O'Connor. Pp. 333, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2014, £45.00. [REVIEW]John Sullivan - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (6):1000-1001.
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  46. Why Agent Causation?Timothy O’Connor - 1996 - Philosophical Topics 24 (2):143-158.
    I Introduction The question of this paper is, what would it be to act with freedom of the will? What kind of control is inchoately in view when we speak, pretheoretically, of being ‘self- determining’ beings, of ‘freely making choices in view of consciously considered reasons’ (pro and con) - of its being ‘up to us’ how we shall act? My question here is not whether we have (or have any reason to think we have) such freedom, or what is (...)
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  47.  53
    Theism and Ultimate Explanation: The Necessary Shape of Contingency, by Timothy O'Connor.R. C. Koons - 2009 - Mind 118 (471):862-867.
  48. Persons & Causes: The Metaphysics of Free Will by Timothy O'Connor.A. A. Buckareff - 2003 - Auslegung 26 (1):69-76.
  49.  8
    Reasons Explanation and Agent Control: In Search of an Integrated Account.Timothy O’Connor & John Ross Churchill - 2004 - Philosophical Topics 32 (1/2):241-253.
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  50. Agent Causation.Timothy O'Connor - 2003 - In Gary Watson (ed.), Free Will. Oxford University Press.
     
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