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Timothy Pritchard
King's College London
  1.  14
    Analogical Cognition: An Insight Into Word Meaning.Timothy Pritchard - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (3):587-607.
    Analogical cognition, extensively researched by Dedre Gentner and her colleagues over the past thirty five years, has been described as the core of human cognition, and it characterizes our use of many words. This research provides significant insight into the nature of word meaning, but it has been ignored by linguists and philosophers of language. I discuss some of the implications of the research for our account of word meaning. In particular, I argue that the research points to, and helps (...)
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  2. Miracles and Violations: Timothy Pritchard.Timothy Pritchard - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):41-58.
    The claim that a miracle is a violation of a law of nature has sometimes been used as part of an a priori argument against the possibility of miracle, on the grounds that a violation is conceptually impossible. I criticize these accounts but also suggest that alternative accounts, when phrased in terms of laws of nature, fail to provide adequate conceptual space for miracles. It is not clear what a ???violation??? of a law of nature might be, but this is (...)
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  3.  15
    Knowing the Meaning of a Word: Shared Psychological States and the Determination of Extensions.Timothy Pritchard - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (1):101-121.
    What is it to know the meaning of a word? The traditional view is that it involves the possession of a concept that determines the extension of a word, with the concept corresponding to a single psychological state. Millikan criticizes this view, denying not only that concepts determine extensions but also that sharing a concept means sharing a psychological state. The purpose of this article is to defend a modified version of the traditional view. I argue that Millikan's claims do (...)
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  4.  10
    Is There Something in Common? Forms and the Theory of Word Meaning.Timothy Pritchard - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1675-1694.
    Plato's reflections on Forms have generally been overlooked, in contemporary Philosophy of Language, as a serious resource for illuminating the notion of word meaning. In part, this is due to the influence of Wittgenstein's critical reflections on looking for ‘something in common’ as explanatory for use of a general term. I argue that, far from being undermined, appeal to Forms can both help explain, and provide corrective critical insight into, Wittgenstein's observations. Plato's reflections provide insight into word meaning that is (...)
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  5.  53
    Locke and the Primary Signification of Words: An Approach to Word Meaning.Timothy Pritchard - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):486-506.
    Locke’s claim that the primary signification of (most) words is an idea, or complex of ideas, has received different interpretations. I support the majority view that Locke’s notion of primary signification can be construed in terms of linguistic meaning. But this reading has been seen as making Locke’s account vulnerable to various criticisms, of which I consider two. First, it appears to make the account vulnerable to the charge that an idea cannot play the role that a word meaning should (...)
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  6.  96
    Meaning, Signification, and Suggestion: Berkeley on General Words.Timothy Pritchard - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (3):301-317.
    Discussion of Berkeley ’s theory of language has largely ignored what he says about the ‘meaning’ of a general word. Berkeley distinguishes the meaning of a general word both from the extension of the word and from what the word might suggest in the mind of the language user. D. Flage has argued that Berkeley has an ‘extensional’ theory of meaning, but this is based on passages where Berkeley does not speak of word meaning. When Berkeley explicitly discusses the meaning (...)
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  7. Review of P. Van Inwagen, The Problem of Evil. [REVIEW]Timothy Pritchard - 2011 - Disputatio 4 (31):303-308.
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  8. The Problem of Evil, by Peter van Inwagen.Timothy Pritchard - 2011 - Disputatio.
     
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  9.  2
    The Problem of Evil. [REVIEW]Timothy Pritchard - 2011 - Disputatio 4 (31):303-308.
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