Results for 'Timothy Willlamson'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Knowing How.Jason Stanley & Timothy Willlamson - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy 98 (8):411-444.
    Many philosophers believe that there is a fundamental distinction between knowing that something is the case and knowing how to do something. According to Gilbert Ryle, to whom the insight is credited, knowledge-how is an ability, which is in turn a complex of dispositions. Knowledge-that, on the other hand, is not an ability, or anything similar. Rather, knowledge-that is a relation between a thinker and a true proposition.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   363 citations  
  2.  19
    II–Timothy Williams: Existence and Contingency.Timothy Williams - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):181-203.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  3.  41
    Logic and Existence: Timothy Williams.Timothy Williams - 1999 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 73 (1):181-203.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  4.  93
    Vagueness and Legal Theory: Timothy A.O. Endicott.Timothy A. O. Endicott - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (1):37-63.
    The use of vague language in law has important implications for legal theory. Legal philosophers have occasionally grappled with those implications, but they have not come to grips with the characteristic phenomenon of vagueness: the sorites paradox. I discuss the paradox, and claim that it poses problems for some legal theorists. I propose that a good account of vagueness will have three consequences for legal theory: Theories that deny that vagueness in formulations of the law leads to discretion in adjudication (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  51
    A Methodological Assessment of Multiple Utility Frameworks: Timothy J. Brennan.Timothy J. Brennan - 1989 - Economics and Philosophy 5 (2):189-208.
    One of the fundamental components of the concept of economic rationality is that preference orderings are “complete,” i.e., that all alternative actions an economic agent can take are comparable. The idea that all actions can be ranked may be called the single utility assumption. The attractiveness of this assumption is considerable. It would be hard to fathom what choice among alternatives means if the available alternatives cannot be ranked by the chooser in some way. In addition, the efficiency criterion makes (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  6. Herbert Hart and the Semantic Sting: Timothy A.O. Endicott.Timothy Endicott - 1998 - Legal Theory 4 (3):283-300.
    Even to disagree, we need to understand each other. If I reject what you say without understanding you, we will only have the illusion of a disagreement. You will be asserting one thing and I will be denying another. Even to disagree, we need some agreement.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  7.  44
    The Futility of Multiple Utility: Timothy J. Brennan.Timothy J. Brennan - 1993 - Economics and Philosophy 9 (1):155-164.
  8. The Philosophy of Philosophy • by Timothy Williamson • Blackwell, 2007. X + 332 Pp. £ 15.99 Paper: Summary. [REVIEW]Timothy Williamson - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):99-100.
    The book is primarily an essay on the epistemology of the sort of armchair knowledge that we can hope to achieve in philosophy. The possibility of such knowledge is not to be explained by reinterpreting philosophical questions as questions about words or concepts. Although there are philosophical questions about words and concepts, most philosophical questions are not about words or concepts: they are, just as they seem to be, about the things, many of them independent of us, to which the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Modal Logic as Metaphysics.Timothy Williamson - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Timothy Williamson gives an original and provocative treatment of deep metaphysical questions about existence, contingency, and change, using the latest resources of quantified modal logic. Contrary to the widespread assumption that logic and metaphysics are disjoint, he argues that modal logic provides a structural core for metaphysics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   276 citations  
  10. Knowledge and Its Limits.Timothy Williamson - 2000 - Philosophy 76 (297):460-464.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1333 citations  
  11.  11
    On the Distinction Between Creation and Conservation: A Partial Defence of Continuous Creation: TIMOTHY D. MILLER.Timothy D. Miller - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (4):471-485.
    The traditional view of divine conservation holds that it is simply a continuation of the initial act of creation. In this essay, I defend the continuous-creation tradition against William Lane Craig's criticism that continuous creation fundamentally misconstrues the intuitive distinction between creation and conservation. According to Craig, creation is the unique causal activity of bringing new patient entities into existence, while conservation involves acting upon already existing patient entities to cause their continued existence. I defend continuous creation by challenging Craig's (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Modality & Other Matters: An Interview with Timothy Williamson.Timothy Williamson & Paal Antonsen - 2010 - Perspectives: International Postgraduate Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):16-29.
    An interview with Timothy Williamson on Modality and other matters. Williams is asked three main questions: the first about the difference between philosophical and non-philosophical knowledge, the second concerns the epistemology of modality, and the third is on the emerging metaphysical picture.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  4
    Continuous Creation and Secondary Causation: The Threat of Occasionalism: TIMOTHY D. MILLER.Timothy D. Miller - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):3-22.
    One standard criticism of the doctrine of continuous creation is that it entails the occasionalist position that God alone is a true cause and that the events we commonly identify as causes are merely the occasions upon which God brings about effects. I begin by clearly stating Malebranche's argument from continuous creation to occasionalism. Next, I examine two strategies for resisting Malebranche's argument ??? strong and weak concurrentism ??? and argue that weak concurrentism is the more promising strategy. Finally, I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  21
    The Plight of the Relative Trinitarian: TIMOTHY W. BARTEL.Timothy W. Bartel - 1988 - Religious Studies 24 (2):129-155.
    According to the Law of Non–Contradiction, no statement and its negation are jointly true. According to many critics, Christians cannot serve both the orthodox faith and the Law of Non–Contradiction: if they hold to the one they must despise the other. And according to an impressive number of these critics, Christians who cling to the traditional doctrine of the Trinity must despise the Law of Non–Contradiction. Augustine's statement of this doctrine poses the problem as poignantly as any.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  64
    Thinking Deeply, Contributing Originally: An Interview with Timothy Williamson (Special Contribution).Timothy Williamson, B. O. Chen & Koji Nakatogawa - 2009 - Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 18:57-87.
  16. Modal Science.Timothy Williamson - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):453-492.
    This paper explains and defends the idea that metaphysical necessity is the strongest kind of objective necessity. Plausible closure conditions on the family of objective modalities are shown to entail that the logic of metaphysical necessity is S5. Evidence is provided that some objective modalities are studied in the natural sciences. In particular, the modal assumptions implicit in physical applications of dynamical systems theory are made explicit by using such systems to define models of a modal temporal logic. Those assumptions (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  17. Knowing and Asserting.Timothy Williamson - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (4):489.
    This paper aims to identify the constitutive rule of assertion, conceived by analogy with the rules of a game. That assertion has such rules is by no means obvious; perhaps it is more like a natural phenomenon than it seems. One way to find out is by supposing that it has such rules, in order to see where the hypothesis leads and what it explains. That will be done here. The hypothesis is not perfectly clear, of course, but we have (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   229 citations  
  18. D. Timothy Goering: System der Käseplatte. Aufstieg und Fall der Dialektischen Theologie.D. Timothy Goering - 2017 - Journal for the History of Modern Theology/Zeitschrift für Neuere Theologiegeschichte 24 (1):1-50.
    The group of Dialectical Theology included some of the most well-known theologians of the 20th century – Karl Barth, Rudolf Bultmann, Friedrich Gogarten, Eduard Thurneysen, Georg Merz und Emil Brunner. In the summer of 1922 they founded the journal Zwischen den Zeiten, which launched Dialectical Theology as the most influential avant-garde movement in Protestantism during the Weimar Republic. Due to internal strife and theological disagreements, the group began to lose strength in the early 1930s and eventually split up and ceased (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Three Faces of Desire.Timothy Schroeder - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    To desire something is a condition familiar to everyone. It is uncontroversial that desiring has something to do with motivation, something to do with pleasure, and something to do with reward. Call these "the three faces of desire." The standard philosophical theory at present holds that the motivational face of desire presents its unique essence--to desire a state of affairs is to be disposed to act so as to bring it about. A familiar but less standard account holds the hedonic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   126 citations  
  20.  49
    Markets, Information, and Benevolence: Timothy J. Brennan.Timothy J. Brennan - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (2):151-168.
    In the January 6, 1991, issue of the Washington Post Magazine, reporter Walt Harrington wrote a profile of Bryan Stevenson. Mr. Stevenson is a 31-year-old working-class African-American from Delaware who graduated from Harvard Law School and the Kennedy School of Government. Like the typical graduate of Harvard Law School, Mr. Stevenson had the opportunity to join the worlds of six-figure corporate law or high-visibility politics. Rather than follow his colleagues, however, Mr. Stevenson works seven-day, eighty-hour weeks as director of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  36
    In Defense of Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay.Timothy Pawl - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This work presents a historically informed, systematic exposition of the Christology of the first seven Ecumenical Councils of undivided Christendom, from the First Council of Nicaea in 325 AD to the Second Council of Nicaea in 787 AD. Assuming the truth of Conciliar Christology for the sake of argument, Timothy Pawl considers whether there are good philosophical arguments that show a contradiction or incoherence in that doctrine. He presents the definitions of important terms in the debate and a helpful (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  22. The Confessions of Second Timothy.Timothy Madigan - 2010 - Free Inquiry 30:32-33.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  27
    Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World.Timothy Morton - 2013 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Having set global warming in irreversible motion, we are facing the possibility of ecological catastrophe. But the environmental emergency is also a crisis for our philosophical habits of thought, confronting us with a problem that seems to defy not only our control but also our understanding. Global warming is perhaps the most dramatic example of what Timothy Morton calls “hyperobjects”—entities of such vast temporal and spatial dimensions that they defeat traditional ideas about what a thing is in the first (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  24. Miracles and Violations: Timothy Pritchard.Timothy Pritchard - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):41-58.
    The claim that a miracle is a violation of a law of nature has sometimes been used as part of an a priori argument against the possibility of miracle, on the grounds that a violation is conceptually impossible. I criticize these accounts but also suggest that alternative accounts, when phrased in terms of laws of nature, fail to provide adequate conceptual space for miracles. It is not clear what a ???violation??? of a law of nature might be, but this is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Tom Farer and Timothy D. Sisk.Timothy D. Sisk - 2012 - In Timothy J. Sinclair (ed.), Global Governance. Polity Press. pp. 18--4.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Putting Inference to the Best Explanation in its Place.Timothy Day & Harold Kincaid - 1994 - Synthese 98 (2):271-295.
    This paper discusses the nature and the status of inference to the best explanation. We outline the foundational role given IBE by its defenders and the arguments of critics who deny it any place at all ; argue that, on the two main conceptions of explanation, IBE cannot be a foundational inference rule ; sketch an account of IBE that makes it contextual and dependent on substantive empirical assumptions, much as simplicity seems to be ; show how that account avoids (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  27.  77
    Gettier Cases in Epistemic Logic.Timothy Williamson - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):1-14.
    The possibility of justified true belief without knowledge is normally motivated by informally classified examples. This paper shows that it can also be motivated more formally, by a natural class of epistemic models in which both knowledge and justified belief are represented. The models involve a distinction between appearance and reality. Gettier cases arise because the agent's ignorance increases as the gap between appearance and reality widens. The models also exhibit an epistemic asymmetry between good and bad cases that sceptics (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  28.  20
    ``Knowing and Asserting&Quot.Timothy Williamson - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (4):489-523.
    Assertions are praised as true, informative, relevant, sincere, warranted, well-phrased, or polite. They are criticized as false, uninformative, irrelevant, insincere, unwarranted, ill-phrased, or rude. Sometimes they deserve such praise or criticism. If any respect in which performances of an act can deserve praise or criticism is a norm for that act, then the speech act of assertion has many norms. So has almost any act; jumps can deserve praise as long or brave, criticism as short or cowardly. But it is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  29. The Aim of Belief.Timothy Chan (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    What is belief? "Beliefs aim at truth" is the commonly accepted starting point for philosophers who want to give an adequate account of this fundamental state of mind, but it raises as many questions as it answers. For example, in what sense can beliefs be said to have an aim of their own? If belief aims at truth, does it mean that reasons to believe must also be based on truth? Must beliefs be formed on the basis of evidence alone? (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  30. In Defense of Eating Meat.Timothy Hsiao - 2015 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (2):277-291.
    Some arguments for moral vegetarianism proceed by appealing to widely held beliefs about the immorality of causing unjustified pain. Combined with the claim that meat is not needed for our nourishment and that killing animals for this reason causes them unjustified pain, they yield the conclusion that eating meat is immoral. However, what counts as a good enough reason for causing pain will depend largely on what we think about the moral status of animals. Implicit in these arguments is the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  31.  11
    Statesmen and Politicians of the Stuart Era : Timothy Eustace , $27.50. [REVIEW]Timothy Kenyon - 1987 - History of European Ideas 8 (6):742-743.
  32. Book Review: Unreliable Sources: Review by Timothy W. Gleason. [REVIEW]Timothy W. Gleason - 1992 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 7 (1):54 – 59.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Autonomy and Manipulation: Refining the Argument Against Persuasive Advertising.Timothy Aylsworth - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-11.
    Critics of persuasive advertising argue that it undermines the autonomy of consumers by manipulating their desires in morally problematic ways. My aim is this paper is to refine that argument by employing a conception of autonomy that is not at odds with certain forms of manipulation. I argue that the charge of manipulation is not sufficient for condemning persuasive advertising. On my view, manipulation of an agent’s desires through advertising is justifiable in cases where the agent accepts the process through (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  31
    In Defense of Irreligious Bioethics.Timothy F. Murphy - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):3-10.
    Some commentators have criticized bioethics as failing to engage religion both as a matter of theory and practice. Bioethics should work toward understanding the influence of religion as it represents people's beliefs and practices, but bioethics should nevertheless observe limits in regard to religion as it does its normative work. Irreligious skepticism toward religious views about health, healthcare practices and institutions, and responses to biomedical innovations can yield important benefits to the field. Irreligious skepticism makes it possible to raise questions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  35.  26
    The Processing-Speed Theory of Adult Age Differences in Cognition.Timothy A. Salthouse - 1996 - Psychological Review 103 (3):403-428.
  36. Toward an Explanatory Framework for Mental Ownership.Timothy Lane - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):251-286.
    Philosophical and scientific investigations of the proprietary aspects of self—mineness or mental ownership—often presuppose that searching for unique constituents is a productive strategy. But there seem not to be any unique constituents. Here, it is argued that the “self-specificity” paradigm, which emphasizes subjective perspective, fails. Previously, it was argued that mode of access also fails to explain mineness. Fortunately, these failures, when leavened by other findings (those that exhibit varieties and vagaries of mineness), intimate an approach better suited to searching (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  37. Desire.Timothy Schroeder - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 1 (6):631-639.
    To desire is to be in a particular state of mind. It is a state of mind familiar to everyone who has ever wanted to drink water or desired to know what has happened to an old friend, but its familiarity does not make it easy to give a theory of desire. Controversy immediately breaks out when asking whether wanting water and desiring knowledge are, at bottom, the same state of mind as others that seem somewhat similar: wishing never to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  38. Self-Consciousness and Immunity.Timothy Lane & Caleb Liang - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (2):78-99.
    Sydney Shoemaker, developing an idea of Wittgenstein’s, argues that we are immune to error through misidentification relative to the first-person pronoun. Although we might be liable to error when “I” (or its cognates) is used as an object, we are immune to error when “I” is used as a subject (as when one says, “I have a toothache”). Shoemaker claims that the relationship between “I” as-subject and the mental states of which it is introspectively aware is tautological: when, say, we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  39. Reply to Sider.Timothy Williamson - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):699-708.
  40. Reply to Vetter.Timothy Williamson - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):796-802.
  41.  19
    Discourse on Civility and Barbarity: A Critical History of Religion and Related Categories.Timothy Fitzgerald - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    In recent years scholars have begun to question the usefulness of the category of ''religion'' to describe a distinctive form of human experience and behavior. In his last book, The Ideology of Religious Studies (OUP 2000), Timothy Fitzgerald argued that ''religion'' was not a private area of human existence that could be separated from the public realm and that the study of religion as such was thus impossibility. In this new book he examines a wide range of English-language texts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  42. Industrial Farming is Not Cruel to Animals.Timothy Hsiao - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (1):37-54.
    Critics of industrial animal agriculture have argued that its practices are cruel, inhumane, or otherwise degrading to animals. These arguments sometimes form the basis of a larger case for the complete abolition of animal agriculture, while others argue for more modest welfare-based reforms that allow for certain types of industrial farming. This paper defends industrial farming against the charge of cruelty. As upsetting as certain practices may seem, I argue that they need not be construed as cruel or inhumane. Any (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  43.  25
    Ethics in Early China: An Anthology. Edited by Chris Fraser, Dan Robins, and Timothy O’Leary.Timothy Connolly - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):210-213.
  44. Self, Belonging, and Conscious Experience: A Critique of Subjectivity Theories of Consciousness.Timothy Lane - 2015 - In Rocco Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed consciousness: New essays on psychopathology and theories of consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 103-140.
    Subjectivity theories of consciousness take self-reference, somehow construed, as essential to having conscious experience. These theories differ with respect to how many levels they posit and to whether self-reference is conscious or not. But all treat self-referencing as a process that transpires at the personal level, rather than at the subpersonal level, the level of mechanism. -/- Working with conceptual resources afforded by pre-existing theories of consciousness that take self-reference to be essential, several attempts have been made to explain seemingly (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  45.  26
    Nicholas C. Burbules, Bryan Warnick, Timothy McDonough, and Scott Johnston.Timothy McDonough - 2004 - In Armen Marsoobian & John Ryder (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to American Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 343.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Disagreement, Error, and an Alternative to Reference Magnetism.Timothy Sundell - 2012 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (4):743 - 759.
    Lewisian reference magnetism about linguistic content determination [Lewis 1983 has been defended in recent work by Weatherson [2003] and Sider [2009], among others. Two advantages claimed for the view are its capacity to make sense of systematic error in speakers' use of their words, and its capacity to distinguish between verbal and substantive disagreements. Our understanding of both error and disagreement is linked to the role of usage and first order intuitions in semantics and in linguistic theory more generally. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  47. Conditionalizing on Knowledge.Timothy Williamson - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (1):89-121.
    A theory of evidential probability is developed from two assumptions:(1) the evidential probability of a proposition is its probability conditional on the total evidence;(2) one's total evidence is one's total knowledge. Evidential probability is distinguished from both subjective and objective probability. Loss as well as gain of evidence is permitted. Evidential probability is embedded within epistemic logic by means of possible worlds semantics for modal logic; this allows a natural theory of higher-order probability to be developed. In particular, it is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  48.  34
    Instituting Science: The Cultural Production of Scientific Disciplines.Timothy Lenoir - 1997 - Stanford University Press.
    Early practitioners of the social studies of science turned their attention away from questions of institutionalisation, which had tended to emphasize macrolevel explanations, and attended instead to microstudies of laboratory practice. The author is interested in re-investigating certain aspects of institution formation, notably the formation of scientific, medical, and engineering disciplines. He emphasises the manner in which science as cultural practice is imbricated with other forms of social, political, and even aesthetic practices. The author considers the following topics: the organic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  49.  44
    Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter & Ezio Vailati - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    First published Sat Apr 5, 2003; most recent substantive revision Wed Aug 22, 2018. -/- Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) was the most influential British philosopher in the generation between Locke and Berkeley. His philosophical interests were mostly in metaphysics, theology, and ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50. Systematicity Theory Meets Socratic Scientific Realism: The Systematic Quest for Truth.Timothy D. Lyons - 2019 - Synthese 196 (3):833-861.
    Systematicity theory—developed and articulated by Paul Hoyningen-Huene—and scientific realism constitute separate encompassing and empirical accounts of the nature of science. Standard scientific realism asserts the axiological thesis that science seeks truth and the epistemological thesis that we can justifiably believe our successful theories at least approximate that aim. By contrast, questions pertaining to truth are left “outside” systematicity theory’s “intended scope” ; the scientific realism debate is “simply not” its “focus”. However, given the continued centrality of that debate in the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000