Order:
  1.  26
    Private and Public Preferences.Timur Kuran - 1990 - Economics and Philosophy 6 (1):1.
    The theory of revealed preference, which lies at the core of the neoclassical economic method, asserts that people's preference orderings are revealed by their actions. This assertion has two possible meanings, of which one is a truism and the other false. When a person joins a riot against the government, he reveals through this action that he would rather riot than not. This is the sense in which the assertion is a truism. But if one means that the person must (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  2.  9
    Insincere Deliberation and Democratic Failure.Timur Kuran - 1998 - Critical Review 12 (4):529-544.
    Abstract An enduring challenge of democracy is to give citizens an effective say in collective decision making by ensuring broad participation in political discourse. Deliberative opinion polling aims to meet this challenge by providing new opportunities for ordinary citizens to form educated opinions. This approach to broadening deliberation does not aim to control substantive outcomes, unlike conceptions of deliberative democracy that promote improved dialogue while also restricting the possible outcomes. But both classes of reform overlook the prevalence of democratic failures (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  14
    The Genesis of Islamic Economics: A Chapter in the Politics of Muslim Identity.Timur Kuran - 1997 - Social Research 64.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  24
    A Chapter in the Pol'tics Of.Timur Kuran - 1997 - Social Research 64 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Political Consequences of Islam’s Economic Legacy.Timur Kuran - 2013 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):395-405.
    Several of the Middle East’s traditional economic institutions hampered its political development by limiting checks on executive power, preventing the formation of organized and durable opposition movements, and keeping civil society weak. They include Islam’s original tax system, which failed to protect property rights; the waqf, whose rigidity hampered the development of civil society; and private commercial enterprises, whose small scales and short lives blocked the development of private coalitions able to bargain with the state. These institutions contributed to features (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark