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Todd Calder [13]Todd C. Calder [1]
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Profile: Todd Calder (Saint Mary's University)
  1. Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card.Todd Calder, Claudia Card, Ann Cudd, Eric Kraemer, Alice MacLachlan, Sarah Clark Miller, María Pía Lara, Robin May Schott, Laurence Thomas & Lynne Tirrell - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    Rather than focusing on political and legal debates surrounding attempts to determine if and when genocidal rape has taken place in a particular setting, this essay turns instead to a crucial, yet neglected area of inquiry: the moral significance of genocidal rape, and more specifically, the nature of the harms that constitute the culpable wrongdoing that genocidal rape represents. In contrast to standard philosophical accounts, which tend to employ an individualistic framework, this essay offers a situated understanding of harm that (...)
     
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  2.  74
    Against Consequentialist Theories of Virtue and Vice.Todd Calder - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (2):201-219.
    Consequentialist theories of virtue and vice, such as the theories of Jeremy Bentham and Julia Driver, characterize virtue and vice in terms of the consequential, or instrumental, properties of these character traits. There are two problems with theories of this sort. First they imply that, under the right circumstances, paradigmatic virtues, such as benevolence, are vices and paradigmatic vices, such as maliciousness, are virtues. This is conceptually problematic. Second, they say nothing about the intrinsic nature of the virtues and vices, (...)
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  3. Is Evil Just Very Wrong?Todd Calder - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (1):177-196.
    Is evil a distinct moral concept? Or are evil actions just very wrong actions? Some philosophers have argued that evil is a distinct moral concept. These philosophers argue that evil is qualitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. Other philosophers have suggested that evil is only quantitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. On this view, evil is just very wrong. In this paper I argue that evil is qualitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. The first part of the paper is critical. I argue that (...)
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  4. The Apparent Banality of Evil: The Relationship Between Evil Acts and Evil Character.Todd Calder - 2003 - Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (3):364–376.
  5.  60
    Kant and Degrees of Wrongness.Todd Calder - 2005 - Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (2):229-244.
  6.  60
    Shared Responsibility, Global Structural Injustice, and Restitution.Todd Calder - 2010 - Social Theory and Practice 36 (2):263-290.
    This paper argues that even the most virtuous people living in affluent Western countries share responsibility for injustices suffered by poor people living in developing countries. The argument of the paper draws on a moral principle that underlies the law of restitution: the principle of unjust enrichment. The paper argues that denizens of affluent Western countries have benefited unjustly from injustices suffered by poor people living in developing countries and that they have a moral responsibility to pay back their unjust (...)
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  7.  68
    Is the Privation Theory of Evil Dead?Todd C. Calder - 2007 - American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (4):371 - 381.
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  8.  21
    Evil and Its Opposite.Todd Calder - 2015 - Journal of Value Inquiry 49 (1-2):113-130.
    The moral status of some particularly horrendous actions cannot be adequately captured by the concept of wrongdoing.See Daniel Haybron, “Moral Monsters and Saints,” Monist, Vol. 85 : p. 260; Paul Formosa, “Evil, Wrongs and Dignity: How to Test a Theory of Evil,” Journal of Value Inquiry, Vol. 47 : pp. 235–253; Eve Garrard, “The Nature of Evil,” Philosophical Explorations: An International Journal for the Philosophy of Mind and Action, Vol. 1 : pp. 43–45; Hillel Steiner, “Calibrating Evil,” The Monist, Vol. (...)
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  9.  13
    Evil Persons.Todd Calder - 2015 - Criminal Justice Ethics 34 (3):350-360.
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  10.  30
    Evil, Ignorance, and the 9/11 Terrorists.Todd Calder - 2004 - Social Philosophy Today 20:53-66.
    In this paper I consider the excuse of ignorance as a justification for acting in a way that would otherwise be evil. My aim is to determine when ignorance precludes us from evildoing and when it does not. I use the 9/11 terrorist attack on America as a case study. In particular, I consider whether the 9/11 terrorists were precluded from evildoing because they thought they were doing right and thus were ignorant about the true nature of their actions. The (...)
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  11.  22
    Report on the 18th International Social Philosophy Conference.Samantha Brennan & Todd Calder - 2003 - Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (1):101-107.
  12. Claudia Card, The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil Reviewed By.Todd Calder - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26 (5):330-332.
     
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  13. Claudia Card, The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. [REVIEW]Todd Calder - 2006 - Philosophy in Review 26:330-332.
     
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  14. Evil, Ignorance, and the 9/11 Terrorists.Todd Calder - 2004 - Social Philosophy Today 20:53-66.
    In this paper I consider the excuse of ignorance as a justification for acting in a way that would otherwise be evil. My aim is to determine when ignorance precludes us from evildoing and when it does not. I use the 9/11 terrorist attack on America as a case study. In particular, I consider whether the 9/11 terrorists were precluded from evildoing because they thought they were doing right and thus were ignorant about the true nature of their actions. The (...)
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