Order:
Disambiguations
Tom Burke [17]Tom J. Burke [1]
  1. Ecological Psychology in Context: James Gibson, Roger Barker, and the Legacy of William James's Radical Empiricism. [REVIEW]Tom Burke - 2004 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (99):54-57.
  2. What is a Situation?Tom Burke - 2000 - History and Philosophy of Logic 21 (2):95-113.
    This paper examines the role of ?situations? in John Dewey's philosophy of logic. To do this properly it is necessary to contrast Dewey's conception of experience and mentality with views characteristic of modern epistemology. The primary difference is that, rather than treat experience as peripheral and or external to mental functions (reason, etc.), we should treat experience as a field in and as a part of which thinking takes place. Experience in this broad sense subsumes theory and fact, hypothesis and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  3. Empiricism, Pragmatism, and the Settlement Movement.Tom Burke - 2010 - The Pluralist 5 (3):73-88.
    This paper examines the settlement movement (a social reform movement during the Progressive Era, roughly 1890–1920) in order to illustrate what pragmatism is and is not. In 1906, Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch proposed an analysis of settlement house methods. Because of her emphasis on interpretation and action, and because of the nature of the settlement movement as a social reform effort with vitally important consequences for everyone involved, it might be thought that her analysis would be pragmatist in character. This paper (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  59
    Dewey's New Logic: A Reply to Russell.Tom Burke - 1994 - University of Chicago Press.
    John Dewey is celebrated for his work in the philosophy of education and acknowledged as a leading proponent of American pragmatism. His philosophy of logic, on the other hand, is largely unheard of. In Dewey's New Logic, Burke analyzes portions of the debate between Dewey and Bertrand Russell that followed the 1938 publication of Dewey's Logic: The Theory of Inquiry. Burke shows how Russell failed to understand Dewey, and how Dewey's philosophy of logic is centrally relevant to contemporary developments in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  5.  43
    Browning on Inquiry Into Inquiry, Part I.Tom Burke - 2009 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):27-44.
    This is the first of two papers addressing Browning’s “Designation, Characterization, and Theory in Dewey’s Logic” (2002) where he distinguishes a series of pre-theoretical and theoretical stages for developing a theory of logic. The second of these two papers will recommend a modified version of this scheme of stages of inquiry into inquiry. The present paper recounts Browning’s original version of these stages and the ramifications of not clearly distinguishing them. I respond to Browning’s claim that in Burke 1994 I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6. Pragmatism and Reference. [REVIEW]Tom Burke - 2009 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):22-25.
  7. Dewey and Russell on the Possibility of Immediate Knowledge.Tom Burke - 1998 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2/3):149-153.
    This paper compares Dewey's and Russell's views of "immediate knowledge." Dewey was perhaps mistaken in attributing to Russell the view that immediate sense data provide incorrigible foundations for knowledge. Russell's characterization of sensing plus attention as the most immediate knowing of which we have experience nevertheless remains a valid target of Dewey's criticisms. These two philosophers developed very different theories of logic and knowledge, language and experience. Given the reconstructed notions of experience and knowledge at the root of Dewey's logical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. A Preliminary Analysis of the Suppressive Effects of Denatonium Saccharide.Stephen F. Davis, Lisa A. Cunningham, Tom J. Burke, M. Melissa Richard, William M. Langley & John Theis - 1986 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (3):229-232.
  9. Prospects for Mathematizing Dewey's Logical Theory.Tom Burke - 2002 - In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press.
    This essay discusses ways in which contemporary mathematical logic may be reconciled with John Dewey’s logical theory. Standard formal techniques drawn from dynamic modal logic, situation theory, generative grammar, generalized quantifier theory, category theory, lambda calculi, game theoretic semantics, network exchange theory, etc., are accommodated within a framework consistent with Dewey’s Logic: The Theory of Inquiry (1938). This essay outlines some basic features of Dewey’s logical theory, working in a top-down fashion through various technical notions pertaining to existential and ideational (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  7
    Realist Implications of a Pragmatist Dual-Process Active-Externalist Theory of Experience.Tom Burke - 2008 - Philosophia Scientiae 12 (1):187-211.
    Realism/antirealism issues are considered in light of a pragmatist philosophy of mind. A pragmatist philosophy of mind is cast in terms of a dual-process active-externalist theory of experience. This theory posits two kinds of experience such that mentality constitutes one of the two kinds of experience. The formal correspondence of theory with facts is characterized in terms of a functional correspondence between these two kinds of experience. Realist and constructivist aspects of this view are then discussed. Active-externalism guarantees a kind (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  3
    Qualities, Universals, Kinds, and the New Riddle of Induction.Tom Burke - 2002 - In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press. pp. 225-235.
    Logic for Dewey is a normative inquiry into the nature of inquiry itself. Goodman’s grue example is assessed in light of Dewey's vocabulary for logic as presented in his 1938 Logic.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    Realist Implications of a Pragmatist Dual-Process Active-Externalist Theory of Experience.Tom Burke - 2008 - Philosophia Scientae 12:187-211.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Dewey's New Logic: A Reply to Russell.Tom Burke - 1998 - University of Chicago Press.
    Although John Dewey is celebrated for his work in the philosophy of education and acknowledged as a leading proponent of American pragmatism, he might also have enjoyed more of a reputation for his philosophy of logic had Bertrand Russell not attacked him so fervently on the subject. In _Dewey's New Logic_, Tom Burke analyzes the debate between Russell and Dewey that followed the 1938 publication of Dewey's _Logic: The Theory of Inquiry_. Here, he argues that Russell failed to understand Dewey's (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. John Dewey's Essays in Experimental Logic.Tom Burke - 2007 - Southern Illinois University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Nicholas Rescher, Realistic Pragmatism: An Introduction to Pragmatic Philosophy Reviewed By.Tom Burke - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20 (4):282-284.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Browning on Inquiry Into Inquiry, Part 2.Tom Burke - 2009 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (2):157-176.
    This is the second of two papers addressing Douglas Browning 's "Designation, Characterization, and Theory in Dewey's Logic" where he distinguishes a series of pretheoretical and theoretical stages for developing a theory of logic. The first paper recounts Browning 's original version of these stages and the ramifications of not clearly distinguishing them. I respond to Browning 's claim that in Burke 1994 I made two such mistakes of not properly distinguishing theoretical and pretheoretical stages of inquiry into inquiry. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17.  43
    The Role of Abstract Reference in Mead's Account of Human Origins.Tom Burke - 2005 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 41 (3):567-601.
    This paper addresses issues regarding human origins, drawing particularly on George Herbert Mead 's account of the emergence of self consciousness as a product of social and physical evolution. Some of John Dewey's ideas on the nature of thought and language are added to that account. The so called "great leap" in human evolution that occurred some 50,000 years ago is attributed not just to the emergence of symbols or language but to the development of fully recursive languages suited for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography