Results for 'Tom Gilbert'

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  1.  84
    Some Reflections on Critical Thinking and Mental Health.Tom Gilbert - 2003 - Teaching Philosophy 26 (4):333-349.
    This paper examines the relationship between critical thinking and mental health in three ways. First, by pointing out how critical thinking plays a role in two current psychotherapies (Rational Emotive Behavior Theory and Cognitive Therapy) insofar as critical thinking deficiencies are an important source of client problems and so part of therapy should be directed at removing irrational thought processes. Second, by articulating the similarities and differences between what mental health professionals do when they employ critical thinking concepts to deal (...)
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  2.  46
    Reimagining Digital Well-Being. Report for Designers & Policymakers.Daan Annemans, Matthew Dennis, , Gunter Bombaerts, Lily E. Frank, Tom Hannes, Laura Moradbakhti, Anna Puzio, Lyanne Uhlhorn, Titiksha Vashist, , Anastasia Dedyukhina, Ellen Gilbert, Iliana Grosse-Buening & Kenneth Schlenker - 2024 - Report for Designers and Policymakers.
    This report aims to offer insights into cutting-edge research on digital well-being. Many of these insights come from a 2-day academic-impact event, The Future of Digital Well-Being, hosted by a team of researchers working with the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) in February 2024. Today, achieving and maintaining well-being in the face of online technologies is a multifaceted challenge that we believe requires using theoretical resources of different research disciplines. This report explores diverse perspectives on how digital (...)
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  3. Joint attention to music.Tom Cochrane - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):59-73.
    This paper contrasts individual and collective listening to music, with particular regard to the expressive qualities of music. In the first half of the paper a general model of joint attention is introduced. According to this model, perceiving together modifies the intrinsic structure of the perceptual task, and encourages a convergence of responses to a greater or lesser degree. The model is then applied to music, looking first at the silent listening situation typical to the classical concert hall, and second (...)
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  4.  13
    Quia Ego Nominor Leo: Barthes, Stereotypes and Aesop’s Animal.Tom Tyler - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (1):193-208.
    Taking Barthes’ discussion of Aesop’s lion as my starting point, I examine the notion of the stereotype as it applies to the use of animals in philosophy and cultural theory. By employing an illustrative selection of animal ciphers from Saussure and Austin, and animal indices from Peirce and Schopenhauer, I argue that theory’s beasts are always at risk of becoming either exemplars of a deadening, generic Animal or mere stultifying stereotypes. Gilbert Ryle’s faithful dog, Fido, as well as a (...)
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  5.  24
    Select Interviews From the INS Annual Meeting—Keith Humphreys, Tom Insel, Uma Karmarkar, Carl Marci, Ariel Cascio, Winston Chiong, Frederic Gilbert, Cynthia Kubu, and Jonathan Pugh.Nathan Ahlgrim, Kristie Garza, Carlie Hoffman, Sarah Coolidge & Ryan H. Purcell - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (1):62-68.
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  6.  44
    The epic of personal development and the mystery of small working memory.Robert B. Glassman - 2005 - Zygon 40 (1):107-130.
    . A partial analogy exists between the lifespan neuropsychological development of individuals and the biological evolution of species: In both of these major categories of growth, progressive emergence of wholes transcends inherently limited part‐processes. The remarkably small purview of each moment of consciousness experienced by an individual may be a crucial aspect of maintaining organization in that individual's cognitive development, protecting it from combinatorial chaos. In this essay I summarize experimental psychology research showing that working memory capacity comprises the so‐called (...)
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  7. The Concept of Mind: 60th Anniversary Edition.Gilbert Ryle - 1949 - New York: Hutchinson & Co.
  8. (Nonsolipsistic) conceptual role semantics.Gilbert Harman - 1987 - In Ernest LePore (ed.), New directions in semantics. Orlando: Academic Press. pp. 55–81.
    CRS says that the meanings of expressions of a language or other symbol system or the contents of mental states are determined and explained by the way symbols are used in thinking. According to CRS one.
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  9. Conceptual role semantics.Gilbert Harman - 1982 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 28 (April):242-56.
  10.  47
    Conceptual role semantics.Gilbert Harman - 1982 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 23:242-256.
  11. The Aesthetic Value of the World.Tom Cochrane - 2021 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book defends Aestheticism- the claim that everything is aesthetically valuable and that a life lived in pursuit of aesthetic value can be a particularly good one. Furthermore, in distilling aesthetic qualities, artists have a special role to play in teaching us to recognize values; a critical component of virtue. I ground my account upon an analysis of aesthetic value as ‘objectified final value’, which is underwritten by an original psychological claim that all aesthetic values are distal versions of practical (...)
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  12.  36
    Individuation in light of notions of form and information.Gilbert Simondon - 2020 - Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. Edited by Taylor Adkins.
    A long-awaited translation on the philosophical relation between technology, the individual, and milieu of the living.
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  13.  19
    Scientism: Philosophy and the Infatuation with Science.Tom Sorell Ltd & Tom Sorell - 1991 - New York: Routledge.
    First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  14.  57
    Deep Brain Stimulation: Inducing Self-Estrangement.Frederic Gilbert - 2017 - Neuroethics 11 (2):157-165.
    Despite growing evidence that a significant number of patients living with Parkison’s disease experience neuropsychiatric changes following Deep Brain Stimulation treatment, the phenomenon remains poorly understood and largely unexplored in the literature. To shed new light on this phenomenon, we used qualitative methods grounded in phenomenology to conduct in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 17 patients living with Parkinson’s Disease who had undergone DBS. Our study found that patients appear to experience postoperative DBS-induced changes in the form of self-estrangement. Using the insights (...)
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  15.  39
    Is an Agreement an Exchange of Promises?Margaret Gilbert - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (12):627-649.
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  16. Scientism: Philosophy and the Infatuation with Science.Tom Sorell - 1991 - New York: Routledge.
    First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  17. Form as Formalization In/Against Theory of the Novel.Tom Eyers - 2016 - Mediations 29 (2).
    Tom Eyers contrasts the different “movements” of the novel and the lyric poem: while moments of stasis in the novel are swept up in its narrative trajectory, atemporal moments in poetry can be juxtaposed against other kinds of temporality — for Eyers’s purposes, most importantly the temporalities of politics and history. The Theory of the Novelbecomes a theory of the lyric, undoing the persistent belief that history can only be made to appear in narrative.
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  18.  23
    Generalization as search.Tom M. Mitchell - 1982 - Artificial Intelligence 18 (2):203-226.
  19. The social model of disability.Tom Shakespeare - 2006 - In Lennard J. Davis (ed.), The Disability Studies Reader. Psychology Press. pp. 2--197.
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  20.  59
    Democracy.Tom Christiano - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  21. Affording introspection: an alternative model of inner awareness.Tom McClelland - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (9):2469-2492.
    The ubiquity of inner awareness thesis states that all conscious states of normal adult humans are characterised by an inner awareness of that very state. UIA-Backers support this thesis while UIA-Skeptics reject it. At the heart of their dispute is a recalcitrant phenomenological disagreement. UIA-Backers claim that phenomenological investigation reveals ‘peripheral inner awareness’ to be a constant presence in their non-introspective experiences. UIA-Skeptics deny that their non-introspective experiences are characterised by inner awareness, and maintain that inner awareness is only gained (...)
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  22. Novels as Arguments.Gilbert Plumer - 2011 - In Frans H. van Eemeren, Bart Garssen, David Godden & Gordon Mitchell (eds.), Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation [CD-ROM]. Amsterdam: Rozenberg / Sic Sat. pp. 1547-1558.
    The common view is that no novel IS an argument, though it might be reconstructed as one. This is curious, for we almost always feel the need to reconstruct arguments even when they are uncontroversially given as arguments, as in a philosophical text. We make the points as explicit, orderly, and (often) brief as possible, which is what we do in reconstructing a novel’s argument. The reverse is also true. Given a text that is uncontroversially an explicit, orderly, and brief (...)
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  23. Fear of Death and the Will to Live.Tom Cochrane - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    The fear of death resists philosophical attempts at reconciliation. Building on theories of emotion, I argue that we can understand our fear as triggered by a de se mode of thinking about death which comes into conflict with our will to live. The discursive mode of philosophy may help us to avoid the de se mode of thinking about death, but it does not satisfactorily address the problem. I focus instead on the voluntary diminishment of one’s will to live. I (...)
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  24. Meaning and semantics.Gilbert Harman - 1974 - In Milton Karl Munitz & Peter K. Unger (eds.), Semantics and philosophy: [essays]. New York: New York University Press.
  25. Knowledge, reasons, and causes.Gilbert H. Harman - 1970 - Journal of Philosophy 67 (21):841-855.
    An attempt to analyse what it is for belief to be based on reasons becomes involved with questions about the goodness of reasons and the gettier examples. intuitions about knowledge and the "gettier effect" can be used to decide when reasoning has occurred and what reasoning there has been. explanation by reasons is not deterministic.
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  26.  87
    Against Virtual Selves.Tom McClelland - 2019 - Erkenntnis 84 (1):21-40.
    According to the virtual self theory, selves are merely virtual entities. On this view, our self-representations do not refer to any concrete object and the self is a merely intentional entity. This contemporary version of the ‘no-self’ theory is driven by a number of psychological and philosophical considerations indicating that our representations of the self are pervasively inaccurate. I present two problems for VST. First, the case for VST fails to rule out a more moderate position according to which the (...)
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  27. The position of the problem of ontogenesis.Gilbert Simondon - 2009 - Parrhesia 7:4-16.
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  28. Plato's Parmenides.Gilbert Ryle - 1939 - Mind 48 (191):129-51 and 302-325.
  29. Using the persona to express complex emotions in music.Tom Cochrane - 2010 - Music Analysis 29 (1-3):264-275.
    This article defends a persona theory of musical expressivity. After briefly summarising the major arguments for this view, it applies persona theory to the issue of whether music can express complex emotions. The expression of jealousy is then discussed by analysis of two examples from Piazzolla and Janacek.
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  30.  15
    The re‐discovery of contemplation through science.Tom McLeish - 2021 - Zygon 56 (3):758-776.
    Some of the early‐modern changes in the social framing of science, while often believed to be essential, are shown to be contingent. They contribute to the flawed public narrative around science today, and especially to the misconceptions around science and religion. Four are examined in detail, each of which contributes to the demise of the contemplative stance that science both requires and offers. They are: (1) a turn from an immersed subject to the pretense of a pure objectivity, (2) a (...)
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  31. Is an agreement an exchange of promises?Margaret Gilbert - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (12):627-649.
    This paper challenges the common assumption that an agreement is an exchange of promises. Proposing that the performance obligations of some typical agreements are simultaneous, interdependent, and unconditional, it argues that no promise-exchange has this structure of obligations. In addition to offering general considerations in support of this claim, it examines various types of promise-exchange, showing that none satisfy the criteria noted. Two forms of conditional promise are distinguished and both forms are discussed. A positive account of agreements as joint (...)
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  32. Group Flow.Tom Cochrane - 2017 - In Micheline Lesaffre, Pieter-Jan Maes & Marc Leman (eds.), The Routledge Companion of Embodied Music Interaction. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 133-140.
    In this chapter I analyse group flow: a state in which performers report intense interpersonal absorption with the music and each other. I compare group flow to individual flow, and argue that the same essential structure can be discerned. I argue that group flow does not justify an anti-representationalist enactivist interpretation. However, I claim that the cognitive task in which the music is produced is irreducibly collective.
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  33.  4
    A Note on the Epistemological Value of Pretense Imagination.Tom Schoonen - 2024 - Episteme 21 (1):99-118.
    Pretense imagination is imagination understood as the ability to recreate rational belief revision. This kind of imagination is used in pretend-play, risk-assessment, etc. Some even claim that this kind of hypothetical belief revision can be grounds to justify new beliefs in conditionals, in particular conditionals that play a foundational role in the epistemology of modality. In this paper, I will argue that it cannot. I will first provide a very general theory of pretense imagination, which I formalise using tools from (...)
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  34. The myth of the specious present.Gilbert Plumer - 1985 - Mind 94 (373):19-35.
    The doctrine of the specious present holds that sensation at an instant encompasses objects as they are over an interval. Now there actually is intersubjective agreement with respect to past, present, and future determinations, and it is a necessary condition for legitimately postulating them as objective. I argue that the specious present doctrine would make this actuality an impossibility, and that the data on which the doctrine is based do not in fact support it.
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  35.  14
    ``Knowledge, Reasons, and Causes".Gilbert H. Harman - 1970 - Journal of Philosophy 67 (21):841-55.
  36.  68
    Principles of Animal Research Ethics.Tom L. Beauchamp & David DeGrazia - 2020 - Oup Usa.
    This volume presents a framework of general principles for animal research ethics together with an analysis of the principles' meaning and moral requirements. Tom L. Beauchamp and David DeGrazia's comprehensive framework addresses ethical requirements pertaining to societal benefit and features a thorough, ethically defensible program of animal welfare. The book also features commentaries on the framework of principles by eminent figures in animal research ethics from an array of relevant disciplines: veterinary medicine, biomedical research, biology, zoology, comparative psychology, primatology, law, (...)
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  37. A Defense of Taking Some Novels As Arguments.Gilbert Plumer - 2015 - In B. J. Garssen, D. Godden, G. Mitchell & A. F. Snoeck Henkemans (eds.), Proceedings of the 8th International Conference of the International Society for the Study of Argumentation [CD-ROM]. Sic Sat. pp. 1169-1177.
    This paper’s main thesis is that in virtue of being believable, a believable novel makes an indirect transcendental argument telling us something about the real world of human psychology, action, and society. Three related objections are addressed. First, the Stroud-type objection would be that from believability, the only conclusion that could be licensed concerns how we must think or conceive of the real world. Second, Currie holds that such notions are probably false: the empirical evidence “is all against this idea…that (...)
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  38.  90
    The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary perspectives on musical arousal, expression, and social control.Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    How can an abstract sequence of sounds so intensely express emotional states? In the past ten years, research into the topic of music and emotion has flourished. This book explores the relationship between music and emotion, bringing together contributions from psychologists, neuroscientists, musicologists, musicians, and philosophers .
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  39. I.—Plato's Parmenides.Gilbert Ryle - 1939 - Mind 48 (190):129-151.
  40. The Transcendental Argument of the Novel.Gilbert Plumer - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (2):148-167.
    Can fictional narration yield knowledge in a way that depends crucially on its being fictional? This is the hard question of literary cognitivism. It is unexceptional that knowledge can be gained from fictional literature in ways that are not dependent on its fictionality (e.g., the science in science fiction). Sometimes fictional narratives are taken to exhibit the structure of suppositional argument, sometimes analogical argument. Of course, neither structure is unique to narratives. The thesis of literary cognitivism would be supported if (...)
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  41.  38
    Animal Rights, Human Wrongs.Tom Regan - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (2):99-120.
    In this essay, I explore the moral foundations of the treatment of animals. Alternative views are critically examined, including the Kantian account, which holds that our duties regarding animals are actually indirect duties to humanity; the cruelty account, which holds that the idea of cruelty explains why it is wrong to treat animals in certain ways; and the utilitarian account, which holds that the value of consequences for all sentient creatures explains our duties to animals. These views are shown to (...)
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  42.  11
    Must Global Politics Constrain Democracy?Alan Gilbert - 1992 - Political Theory 20 (1):8-37.
    The government itself, which is the only mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable [with the standing army] to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it. Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure. Henry Thoreau, in “Civil Disobedience” It is easy to say — and often (...)
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  43. Cognition and Literary Ethical Criticism.Gilbert Plumer - 2011 - In Frank Zenker (ed.), Argumentation: Cognition & Community. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation. pp. 1-9.
    “Ethical criticism” is an approach to literary studies that holds that reading certain carefully selected novels can make us ethically better people, e.g., by stimulating our sympathetic imagination (Nussbaum). I try to show that this nonargumentative approach cheapens the persuasive force of novels and that its inherent bias and censorship undercuts what is perhaps the principal value and defense of the novel—that reading novels can be critical to one’s learning how to think.
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  44.  37
    Comforting when we cannot heal: the ethics of palliative sedation.Gilbert Meilaender - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (3):211-220.
    This essay considers whether palliative sedation is or is not appropriate medical care. This requires one to consider whether, in addition to the good of health, relief of suffering is also a proper end of medicine; whether unconsciousness can ever be a good for a human being; and how double-effect reasoning can help us think about difficult cases. The author concludes that palliative sedation may be proper medical care, but only in a limited range of cases.
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  45. Reflections on knowledge and its limits.Gilbert Harman - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):417-428.
    Williamson’s Knowledge and its Limits is the most important philosophical discussion of knowledge in many years. It sets the agenda for epistemology for the next decade and beyond.
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  46.  40
    Bioethics: a primer for Christians.Gilbert Meilaender - 2005 - Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
    This new edition of his "Bioethics features updated information throughout, a fuller discussion of human embryos -- including stem cell research -- and a ...
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  47.  75
    A Farewell Editorial.Tom Christiano, Jon Riley & Andrew Williams - 2023 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 22 (4):377-378.
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  48.  17
    The Nature of Applied Ethics.Tom L. Beauchamp - 2003 - In R. G. Frey & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.), A Companion to Applied Ethics. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1–16.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Historical Background Problems of Definition Problems of Moral Content Problems of Method and Justification Problems of Specification Problems of Conflict and Disagreement Conclusion.
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  49. Argumentatively Evil Storytelling.Gilbert Plumer - 2016 - In D. Mohammend & M. Lewinski (eds.), Argumentation and Reasoned Action: Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Argumentation, Lisbon 2015, Vol. 1. College Publications. pp. 615-630.
    What can make storytelling “evil” in the sense that the storytelling leads to accepting a view for no good reason, thus allowing ill-reasoned action? I mean the storytelling can be argumentatively evil, not trivially that (e.g.) the overt speeches of characters can include bad arguments. The storytelling can be argumentatively evil in that it purveys false premises, or purveys reasoning that is formally or informally fallacious. My main thesis is that as a rule, the shorter the fictional narrative, the greater (...)
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  50. (Nonsolipsistic) conceptual role semantics.Gilbert Harman - 1987 - In Ernest LePore (ed.), New directions in semantics. Orlando: Academic Press.
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