Results for 'Tom Mccoy'

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  1. Intention, Temporal Order, and Moral Judgments.Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Ron Mallon, Tom Mccoy & Jay G. Hull - 2008 - Mind and Language 23 (1):90–106.
    The traditional philosophical doctrine of double effect claims that agents’ intentions affect whether acts are morally wrong. Our behavioral study reveals that agents’ intentions do affect whether acts are judged morally wrong, whereas the temporal order of good and bad effects affects whether acts are classified as killings. This finding suggests that the moral judgments are not based on the classifications. Our results also undermine recent claims that prior moral judgments determine whether agents are seen as causing effects intentionally rather (...)
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  2.  72
    Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists.Marina McCoy - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Marina McCoy explores Plato's treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of philosophy. However, the philosopher and the sophist are distinguished by (...)
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  3.  74
    A Response to the Essays On My Thought.Charles S. McCoy - 1997 - Tradition and Discovery 24 (3):44-45.
    This brief essay comments on the several preceding essays analyzing Charles S. McCoy’s thought.
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  4.  12
    Faith in Shakespeare.Richard C. McCoy - 2013 - Oup Usa.
    Rather than exploring faith as it relates to various political and historical controversies of the early modern period, Richard McCoy argues that "faith" in Shakespearean drama is best viewed as secular and poetic instead of an exclusively religious phenomenon.
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  5.  16
    Living Into Leadership: A Journey in Ethics.Bowen H. McCoy - 2007 - Stanford Business Books.
    Over the past few years, the business world has been wracked by corporate scandals. With news of a new scandal an almost weekly occurrence, one cannot help but wonder: “Is business success synonymous with a lack of morality?” With a resounding “no,” Bowen H. “Buzz” McCoy, former partner at Morgan Stanley, shows that ethical business leadership is possible and, moreover, desirable. Seeking inspiration from an eclectic range of sources, such as Dante, Kant, and Peter Drucker, and drawing from his (...)
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  6.  11
    Wounded Heroes: Vulnerability as a Virtue in Ancient Greek Literature and Philosophy.Marina Berzins McCoy - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    McCoy examines how Greek epic, tragedy, and philosophy offer important insights into the nature of human vulnerability, especially how Greek thought extols the recognition and proper acceptance of vulnerability. Beginning with the literary works of Homer and Sophocles, she also expands her analysis to the philosophical works of Plato and Aristotle.
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  7.  37
    Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics.E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdés-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):165-183.
    Continuous recordings of brain electrical activity were obtained from a group of 176 patients throughout surgical procedures using general anesthesia. Artifact-free data from the 19 electrodes of the International 10/20 System were subjected to quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (QEEG). Induction was variously accomplished with etomidate, propofol or thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained throughout the procedures by isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane (N = 68), total intravenous anesthesia using propofol (N = 49), or nitrous oxide plus narcotics (N = 59). A set (...)
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  8. Applied Ecology and the Logic of Case Studies.Kristin Shrader-Frechette & Earl D. Mccoy - 1994 - Philosophy of Science 61 (2):228-249.
    Because of the problems associated with ecological concepts, generalizations, and proposed general theories, applied ecology may require a new "logic" of explanation characterized neither by the traditional accounts of confirmation nor by the logic of discovery. Building on the works of Grunbaum, Kuhn, and Wittgenstein, we use detailed descriptions from research on conserving the Northern Spotted Owl, a case typical of problem solving in applied ecology, to (1) characterize the method of case studies; (2) survey its strengths; (3) summarize and (...)
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  9.  24
    Using an Ecological Ethics Framework to Make Decisions About the Relocation of Wildlife.Earl D. McCoy & Kristin Berry - 2008 - Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):505-521.
    Relocation is an increasingly prominent conservation tool for a variety of wildlife, but the technique also is controversial, even among conservation practitioners. An organized framework for addressing the moral dilemmas often accompanying conservation actions such as relocation has been lacking. Ecological ethics may provide such a framework and appears to be an important step forward in aiding ecological researchers and biodiversity managers to make difficult moral choices. A specific application of this framework can make the reasoning process more transparent and (...)
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  10.  56
    Biodiversity, Biological Uncertainty, and Setting Conservation Priorities.K. S. Shrader-Frechette & E. D. Mccoy - 1994 - Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):167-195.
    In a world of massive extinctions where not all taxa can be saved, how ought biologists to decide their preservation priorities? When biologists make recommendations regarding conservation, should their analyses be based on scientific criteria, on public or lay criteria, on economic or some other criteria? As a first step in answering this question, we examine the issue of whether biologists ought to try to save the endangered Florida panther, a well known glamour taxon. To evaluate the merits of panther (...)
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  11.  48
    The Argument of the Philebus.Joe McCoy - 2007 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (1):1-16.
    This essay explores Socrates’ argumentative strategy in the Philebus, which is a response to the view that pleasure is the good. Socrates leads his interlocutorsthrough a series of steps in order to demonstrate to them the “conditions and dispositions of soul” upon which hedonism rests. Socrates’ aim is not to refute the claim that pleasure is a good, but rather to show the dependence of the experience of pleasure on intellect and the other elements of the life of mind. In (...)
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  12.  50
    Connecting Information Structure and Discourse Structure Through "Kontrast": The Case of Colloquial Russian Particles -TO, Že, and Ved'. [REVIEW]Svetlana McCoy - 2003 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 12 (3):319-335.
    The notion of kontrast, or the ability of certain linguistic expressions to generate a set of alternatives, originally proposed by Vallduví and Vilkuna (1998) as a clause-level concept, is re-analyzed here as connecting the level of information packaging in the clause and the level of discourse structure in the following way: kontrast is encoded at the clausal level but has repercussions for discourse structure. This claim is supported by evidence from the distribution properties of three colloquial Russian particles -to, e, (...)
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  13.  35
    Dispelling the Hero From Our Soul.Jacob Rogozinski & Kevin McCoy - 1991 - Research in Phenomenology 21 (1):62-80.
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  14.  10
    Producing "What the Deans Know": Cost Accounting and the Restructuring of Post-Secondary Education". [REVIEW]Liza McCoy - 1998 - Human Studies 21 (4):395-418.
    This article uses institutional ethnography to investigate how accounting texts mediate the reshaping of managerial practice in the educational sector. The community college system in Ontario is currently undergoing an extensive process of restructuring. Operating grants have been reduced; government spending policies increasingly pull colleges into market relations. In this context, college administrators are working to develop new ways of "doing business." Integral to this are accounting procedures that play a powerful role in organizational restructuring by creating new patterns of (...)
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  15. Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics - Volume 10, Number 2 (2001), Pages 165-183.E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):138-138.
     
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  16. Tom Regan on Kind Arguments Against Animal Rights and for Human Rights.Nathan Nobis - 2016 - In Mylan Engel Jr & Gary Comstock (eds.), The Moral Rights of Animals. Lexington Books. pp. 65-80.
    Tom Regan argues that human beings and some non-human animals have moral rights because they are “subjects of lives,” that is, roughly, conscious, sentient beings with an experiential welfare. A prominent critic, Carl Cohen, objects: he argues that only moral agents have rights and so animals, since they are not moral agents, lack rights. An objection to Cohen’s argument is that his theory of rights seems to imply that human beings who are not moral agents have no moral rights, but (...)
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  17. "We Are All Noah: Tom Regan's Olive Branch to Religious Animal Ethics".Matthew C. Halteman - 2018 - Between the Species 21 (Regan: In Memorium):151-177.
    For the past thirty years, the late Tom Regan bucked the trend among secular animal rights philosophers and spoke patiently and persistently to the best angels of religious ethics in a stream of publications that enjoins religious scholars, clergy, and lay people alike to rediscover the resources within their traditions for articulating and living out an animal ethics that is more consistent with their professed values of love, mercy, and justice. My aim in this article is to showcase some of (...)
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  18.  60
    Filosofia, Tom E ilusão musical em Kant. Da vivificação sonora do ânimo à recepção do Tom da razão.Nuria Sánchez Madrid - 2012 - Trans/Form/Ação 35 (1):47-72.
    O artigo tenciona, primeiramente, enriquecer o estudo da função que o conceito de tom desempenha na ideia kantiana de razão, ao estendê-lo à análise da música como arte dos sons que a Crítica do Juízo contém. Em segundo lugar, propõe-se determinar os motivos pelos quais a matemática se revela incapaz, devido à especificidade do método filosófico e à corporalidade da ecepção musical, respectivamente, de expressar o modo de proceder da razão e da arte dos sons. Finalmente, aponta-se para uma semelhança (...)
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  19.  30
    Tom Regan's Seafaring Dog and (Un) Equal Inherent Worth.Rem B. Edwards - 1993 - Between the Species 9 (4):231-235.
    Tom Regan's seafaring dog that is justifiably thrown out of the lifeboat built for four to save the lives of four humans has been the topic of much discussion. Critics have argued in a variety of ways that this dog nips at Regan's Achilles heel. Without reviewing previous discussions, with much of which I certainly agree, this article develops an unexplored approach to exposing the vulnerability of the position that Regan takes on sacrificing the dog to save the humans. It (...)
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  20.  29
    Thieves of Virtue: When Bioethics Stole Medicine by Tom Koch (Review).Tom L. Beauchamp - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):11-14.
    The principal thesis in this book is that bioethics emerged—in the 1960s through the 1980s—under the influence of philosophers who claimed to have universally valid principles that could steer medicine and research to the solution of ethical problems, including even those arising at the bedside of patients. Tom Koch contends that these philosophers and their allied bioethicists “stole medicine” and its traditional values, substituting a philosophical discourse generally inaccessible to the average person. Philosophers thereby refashioned medical ethics in accordance with (...)
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  21. How We Think Mādhyamikas Think: A Response To Tom Tillemans.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):426-435.
    In his article in this issue, " 'How do Mādhyamikas Think?' Revisited," Tom Tillemans reflects on his earlier article "How do Mādhyamikas Think?" (2009), itself a response to earlier work of ours (Deguchi et al. 2008; Garfield and Priest 2003). There is much we agree with in these non-dogmatic and open-minded essays. Still, we have some disagreements. We begin with a response to Tillemans' first thoughts, and then turn to his second thoughts.Tillemans (2009) maintains that it is wrong to attribute (...)
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  22. Epistemic Instrumentalism and Reasons for Belief: A Reply to Tom Kelly's "Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique".Adam Leite - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):456–464.
    Tom Kelly argues that instrumentalist aeeounts of epistemie rationality fail beeause what a person has reason to believe does not depend upon the eontent of his or her goals. However, his argument fails to distinguish questions about what the evidence supports from questions about what a person ought to believe. Once these are distinguished, the instrumentalist ean avoid Kelly’s objeetions. The paperconcludes by sketehing what I take to be the most defensible version of the instrumentalist view.
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  23.  21
    Time and Truth: The Presentism-Eternalism Debate: Tom Stoneham.Tom Stoneham - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):201-218.
    There are many questions we can ask about time, but perhaps the most fundamental is whether there are metaphysically interesting differences between past, present and future events. An eternalist believes in a block universe: past, present and future events are all on an equal footing. A gradualist believes in a growing block: he agrees with the eternalist about the past and the present but not about the future. A presentist believes that what is present has a special status. My first (...)
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  24.  79
    Epistemic Instrumentalism and Reasons for Belief: A Reply to Tom Kelly’s “Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique”.Adam Leite - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):456-464.
    Tom Kelly argues that instrumentalist aeeounts of epistemie rationality fail beeause what a person has reason to believe does not depend upon the eontent of his or her goals. However, his argument fails to distinguish questions about what the evidence supports from questions about what a person ought to believe. Once these are distinguished, the instrumentalist ean avoid Kelly’s objeetions. The paperconcludes by sketehing what I take to be the most defensible version of the instrumentalist view.
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  25.  92
    Multi-Dimensional Utility and the Index Number Problem: Jeremy Bentham, J. S. Mill, and Qualitative Hedonism: Tom Warke.Tom Warke - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):176-203.
    This article develops an unconventional perspective on the utilitarianism of Bentham and Mill in at least four areas. First, it is shown that both authors conceived of utility as irreducibly multi-dimensional, and that Bentham in particular was very much aware of the ambiguity that multi-dimensionality imposes upon optimal choice under the greatest happiness principle. Secondly, I argue that any attribution of intrinsic worth to any form of human behaviour violates the first principles of Bentham's and Mill's utilitarianism, and that this (...)
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  26.  32
    Revisiting Tom Tom: Performative Anamnesis and Autonomous Vision in Ken Jacobs’ Appropriations of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son.Edwin Carels - 2018 - Foundations of Science 23 (2):217-230.
    In 1969 the American avant-garde filmmaker Ken Jacobs gained wide recognition with a two-hour long interpretation of a 1905 silent short film. Ever since, the artist has kept on revisiting the same material, each time with a different technological approach. Originally hailed as a prime example of structural filmmaking, Jacobs’ more recent variations on the theme of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son beg for a broader understanding of his methods and the meanings implied. To gain a deeper insight in this (...)
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  27.  79
    The Right to Privacy and the Right to Die: TOM L. BEAUCHAMP.Tom L. Beauchamp - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):276-292.
    Western ethics and law have been slow to come to conclusions about the right to choose the time and manner of one's death. However, policies, practices, and legal precedents have evolved quickly in the last quarter of the twentieth century, from the forgoing of respirators to the use of Do Not Resuscitate orders, to the forgoing of all medical technologies, and now, in one U.S. state, to legalized physician-assisted suicide. The sweep of history—from the Quinlan case in New Jersey to (...)
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  28.  99
    The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):1–24.
    Kant's claim that modality is a 'category' provides an approach to modality to be contrasted with Lewis's reductive analysis. Lewis's position is unsatisfactory, since it depends on an inherently modal conception of a world. This suggests that modality is 'primitive'; and the Kantian position is a prima facie plausible position of this kind, which is filled out by considering the relationship between modality and inference. This provides a context for comparing the Kantian position with Wright's non-cognitivist 'conventionalism'. Wright's position is (...)
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  29.  75
    Tom Seppalainen, Review of Through the Rearview Mirror: Historical Reflections on Psychology by John Macnamara. [REVIEW]Tom Seppalainen - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):549-551.
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  30.  53
    Faith as a First Principle in Charles McCoy’s Theology and Ethics.Richard Gelwick - 1997 - Tradition and Discovery 24 (3):29-40.
    Charles McCoy’s Christian theology and ethics are based in a covenantal understanding that provides a way for Christians to engage the many views in the modern university. McCoy’s approach has both openness and commitment; it is akin to and supported by the fiduciary thought of Johannes Cocceius, H. R. Niebuhr, and Michael Polanyi. By seeing the way faith as trust operates in human beings, McCoy has laid foundations for Christian theology in a muticultural and pluralistic age. Most (...)
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  31.  40
    Hume – Cyber-Hume – Enactive Hume. Interview with Tom Froese.Tom Froese, Karolina Karmaza, Przemysław Nowakowski & Witold Wachowski - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (1).
  32.  17
    The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (1):1-24.
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  33.  75
    Remembering Charles McCoy.Phil Mullins - 2002 - Tradition and Discovery 29 (2):8-11.
    This essay is an obituary notice for Charles S. McCoy, who introduced many to Polanyi’s ideas and made creative use of Polanyi’in his scholarship.
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  34.  19
    Wight, Tom 1998 - Paul Us van Tarsus: Een Kennismaking Met Zijn Tbeologie.Tom Wight - 1999 - Hts Theological Studies 55 (4).
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  35. Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
     
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  36.  30
    Permutations of Post-Critical Thinking: Themes in Charles McCoy’s Life and Thought.Phil Mullins - 1997 - Tradition and Discovery 24 (3):5-14.
    This essay reviews the contributions of Charles S. McCoy in three areas: religion and higher education, theology and ethics. I analyze McCoy’s primary ideas as a blending of influences from covenantal theology, Plato, Michael Polanyi and H. Richard Niebuhr.
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  37. What Peeping Tom Did Wrong.John Draeger - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):41-49.
    Voyeurism seems creepy. This paper considers whether these feelings are well-founded. It identifies a variety of ethically troubling features, including harmful consequences, deceit, and the violation of various religious, legal, and conventional norms. Voyeurism is something of a moral misdemeanor that seems worrisome when associated with these other failings. However, because voyeurism remains troubling even in the absence of harm or deceit, we must pay special attention to the ways complex social conventions can be used to show disrespect for others. (...)
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  38.  17
    Is Tom Shakespeare Disabled?T. Koch - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):18-20.
    Is Tom Shakespeare disabled, or simply distinct in stature? And if the latter, what makes that distinction important?For more than a decade, the British sociologist has been a critical voice in the sociology of difference. The son of a physician with achondroplasia “widely admired as a doctor and as a disabled role model” ,1 Shakespeare fils also has achondroplasia, is the father of children with the condition and, like his father, is professionally successful. As his book’s back cover announces, Shakespeare (...)
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  39.  20
    Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation Reconsidered Ed. By Daniel Breazeale and Tom Rockmore.F. Scott Scribner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):548-549.
    Interpretation always takes place in the present tense. It is worth reminding ourselves of this, because few philosophical texts or treatises have suffered the rise and fall of the vagaries of their own contemporary Weltanschauung as Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation. Few texts in history have been simultaneously so overestimated and underestimated in their impact and importance as Fichte's Addresses; and therefore few texts can be said to be so misunderstood—and so need in of reassessment. This collection, Fichte's Addresses (...)
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  40.  36
    Rockmore, Tom. Kant and Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Paul Symington - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (2):380-382.
    Book review of Tom Rockmore's "Kant & Phenomenology," which appeared in "Review of Metaphysics" in 2011.
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  41.  28
    Interview: Tom Chappell.Tom Chappell & Craig Cox - 1994 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 8 (1):16-18.
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  42.  20
    The Rights Approach to Mental Illness: Tom Campbell.Tom Campbell - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:221-253.
    The concept of rights is now so dominant in the language of politics that it is becoming difficult to identify its use with any particular approach to the solution of social problems or to gain a clear picture of its significance, its advantages and its disadvantages as a way of conceptualizing and resolving contentious political issues. None the less there is a perceptible shift towards an emphasis on rights in contemporary politics which many welcome and encourage and others question and (...)
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  43.  37
    Tom MELS (ed.), Reanimating Places : a Geography of Rhythms.Derek McCormack - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    T. Mels (ed.), Reanimating Places : a Geography of Rhythms, Aldershot : Ashgate, 2004, 278 p. Quelques pages sont accessibles ici. For geographers, rhythm is one of the most seductive and elusive of concepts. And, as Tom Mels's expansive introductory essay to this collection demonstrates, it is possible to trace the 'lineage of a geography of rhythms' through various theoretical and empirical trajectories. The content and tone of this volume is, however, dominated by one particular (...) - Recensions.
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  44.  16
    Critical Thinking, Rhetoric, Ideology: Excerpts From an Interview with Tom Bridges.Tom Bridges & Robert Esformes - 1990 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 5 (3):7-8.
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  45.  50
    Tom Stonier's Response.Tom Stonier - 1999 - World Futures 53 (4):375-376.
  46.  48
    A Journalism of Philosophy: A Book Review by Tom Brislin. [REVIEW]Tom Brislin - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):49 – 51.
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  47.  48
    A New Perspective on Economic Analysis in Health Care?: A Critical Review of 'The Economics of Health Reconsidered' by Tom Rice. [REVIEW]Stephen Jan - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (1):99-106.
    A recently published book, 'The Economics of Health Reconsidered' by Tom Rice, provides a strong critique of the role of markets in health care. Many of the issues of 'market failure' raised by Rice, however, have been, to varying extents, recognised previously in the health economics literature (at least outside the U.S.). What perhaps sets Rice's book apart from previous attempts to document such issues is its elegance and the methodical manner in which this critique is delivered. Significantly the critique (...)
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  48.  14
    World Views and Moral Decisions: A Reply to Tom Regan.Don E. Marietta Jr - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (4):369-371.
    Tom Regan criticizes my thesis that obligation toward the environment is grounded in a world view and thereby has a moral overridingness which mere interests and desires do not have. He holds that my approach is too subjectivistic. I counter, first, by explaining that phenomenology, which I use in my analysis of moral obligation, is not subjectivistic in the way emotivism or prescriptivism inethics is subjectivistic. Second, I argue that world views are products of learning and experience of one shared (...)
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  49.  19
    What We Made: Conversations on Art and Social Cooperation, by Tom Finkelpearl. [REVIEW]Andrea Baldini - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (4):120-124.
    Tom Finkelpearl is a unique figure in contemporary art. He is the executive director of the Queens Museum of Art. However, for decades, he has been a passionate advocate of unconventional artistic practices that have been flourishing outside the boundaries of the mainstream circuit of museums, biennales, art fairs, galleries, and art schools. In recognition of his involvement in promoting nontraditional forms of art, Public Art Dialogue, one of the most important associations devoted to public art, has recently awarded Finkelpearl (...)
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  50.  38
    Review of Disability Rights and Wrongs by Tom Shakespeare. [REVIEW]S. D. Edwards - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):222-222.
    Tom Shakepeare is an eminent, and somewhat controversial, contributor to disability studies. As he outlines, part of the explanation for his controversial status within that field stems from his engagement with disciplines outside it, including genetics and bioethics. For many in the field of disability studies, no genuine engagement should be sought with scholars in genetics or bioethics because—so the party line goes—these areas of study are inherently opposed to disability rights and otherwise pose genuine threats to the status of (...)
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