Results for 'Tom Smythe'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  11
    Simplicity and Theology.Don Fawkes & Tom Smythe - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (2):259 - 270.
    Richard Swinburne has given a defense of arguments for the existence of God (and in particular of teleological arguments) in his book "The Existence of God" (1979/1991). This paper argues that such theistic arguments fail, and poses some general problems for theistic arguments. Swinburne's use of a principle of simplicity is not given adequate justification and, if justified, works against theism. There are adequate rebuttals to Swinburne's arguments that depend upon there being few particles of basic physics, universal laws of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  12
    Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics.E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino - 2001 - Consciousness and Cognition 10 (2):165-183.
    Continuous recordings of brain electrical activity were obtained from a group of 176 patients throughout surgical procedures using general anesthesia. Artifact-free data from the 19 electrodes of the International 10/20 System were subjected to quantitative analysis of the electroencephalogram (QEEG). Induction was variously accomplished with etomidate, propofol or thiopental. Anesthesia was maintained throughout the procedures by isoflurane, desflurane or sevoflurane (N = 68), total intravenous anesthesia using propofol (N = 49), or nitrous oxide plus narcotics (N = 59). A set (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  3.  73
    Owning the Story: Ethical Considerations in Narrative Research.William E. Smythe & Maureen J. Murray - 2000 - Ethics and Behavior 10 (4):311 – 336.
    This article argues that traditional, regulative principles of research ethics offer insufficient guidance for research in the narrative study of lives. These principles presuppose an implicit epistemology that conceives of research participants as data sources, a conception that is argued not tenable for narrative research. The case is made by drawing on recent discussions of research ethics in the qualitative and narrative research literature. This article shows that narrative ethics is inextricably entwined with epistemological issues--namely, issues of narrative ownership and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  4. Intuition as a Basic Source of Moral Knowledge.Thomas W. Smythe & Thomas G. Evans - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (2):233-247.
    The idea that intuition plays a basic role in moral knowledge and moral philosophy probably began in the eighteenth century. British philosophers such as Anthony Shaftsbury, Francis Hutcheson, Thomas Reid, and later David Hume talk about a “moral sense” that they place in John Locke’s theory of knowledge in terms of Lockean reflexive perceptions, while Richard Price seeks a faculty by which we obtain our ideas of right and wrong. In the twentieth century intuitionism in moral philosophy was revived by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  28
    Problems About Corporate Moral Personhood.Thomas W. Smythe - 1985 - Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (4):327-333.
    According to peter french, A corporation can be construed as a moral person in the same sense that you and I are persons. Whether this view is tenable is an open question. I examine the objections to this view made in the recent literature and find them wanting. I deal with the questions whether corporations can have intentions, Rights, And consciousness.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  39
    Unconscious Desires and the Meaning of 'Desire'.Thomas W. Smythe - 1972 - The Monist 56 (July):413-425.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  32
    Disembodied Minds and Personal Identity.Thomas W. Smythe - 1988 - Philosophy Research Archives 14:415-423.
    Discussion of the human soul has bulked large in the literature of philosophy and religion. I defend the possibility of disembodied Cartesian minds by examining the criticisms of three philosophers who argue that there are serious difficulties about any attempt to account for the identity of such Cartesian minds through time. I argue that their criticisms of the possibility of disembodied minds are damaging but not fatal. I hold that the central issue behind their criticisms of Cartesian minds is whether (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  28
    Self-Knowledge and the Self.Thomas W. Smythe - 2001 - Journal of Philosophical Research 26 (January):287-294.
    Although it is unpopular in analytical philosophy nowadays to talk about the Self, I attempt to resurrect the concept by articulating a mode of self-knowledge recently introduced in the literature on perceiving God, and described as nonsensory perception. Contrary to Hume, I point out various aspects of the Self that a subject can perceive in a nonsensory manner. I cite some historical forerunners for such a conception of self-knowledge of the self. I use a thought experiment to indicate, in a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  37
    Our Knowledge of Other Minds.Thomas W. Smythe - 1983 - Philosophia 13 (September):35-52.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  35
    Chisholm on Personal Identity.Thomas W. Smythe - 1975 - Philosophical Studies 27 (5):351 - 360.
  11.  27
    Naill Shanks. God, the Devil, and Darwin: A Critique of Intelligent Design Theory.Thomas Wayne Smythe - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (2):251-254.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  26
    Moral Responsibility.Thomas W. Smythe - 1999 - Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (4):493-506.
    [From introduction:] A theory of moral responsibility sets out the conditions under which we believe that an individual is a rational candidate for praise and blame on account of his behaviour. Such a theory needs to be supplemented by a further moral theory that specifies which morally responsible agents ought to be praised or blamed for their actions. We will focus here on the first sort of theory only. The theory present here will be similar to theories held by others.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  20
    Elements of Risk in Qualitative Research.Thomas Hadjistavropoulos & William E. Smythe - 2001 - Ethics and Behavior 11 (2):163 – 174.
    Qualitative research occupies a useful and important role in social science inquiry. Nonetheless, when ethical issues surrounding this research are discussed, elements of risk may be neglected. Qualitative research often raises concerns about the protection of the confidentiality of not only the participants but also of 3rd parties mentioned in transcribed narratives. Moreover, we argue that, in some instances, qualitative research has considerable potential of inducing negative psychological states. We conclude by presenting a series of recommendations that can be used (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  5
    A Respectful Reply to Gottlieb and Lasser.William E. Smythe & Maureen J. Murray - 2001 - Ethics and Behavior 11 (2):195 – 199.
    In this brief note, we respond to Gottlieb and Lasser's (2001/this issue) critical commentary on our work on narrative research ethics. We argue that their concern for privileging voices needs to be balanced against the risk of exploiting some research participants, that conflicts of interest are best resolved through appropriately prioritizing ethical principles and in consultation with others, and that the researcher's ability to protect participants from harm can be enhanced through appropriate clinical training and access to clinical expertise. We (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Invariant Reversible QEEG Effects of Anesthetics - Volume 10, Number 2 (2001), Pages 165-183.E. R. John, L. S. Prichep, W. Kox, P. Valdes-Sosa, J. Bosch-Bayard, E. Aubert, M. Tom, F. diMichele & L. D. Gugino - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):138-138.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. The Case for Cognitive Conservatism: A Critique of Dan Lloyd's Approach to Mental Representation.William E. Smythe - 1989 - Behaviorism 17 (1):63-73.
    A critique of the view of "cognitive liberalism," as articulated in recent papers by Dan Lloyd , is presented. The main arguments are directed at Lloyd's claim that representational capacities may be found in organisms as simple as marine mollusks and at his formal analysis of cognitive representation as a type of information-bearing conditional dependency. An alternative interpretation-based view of cognitive representation is then briefly sketched.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  24
    "We Are All Noah: Tom Regan's Olive Branch to Religious Animal Ethics".Matthew C. Halteman - forthcoming - Between the Species: An Electronic Journal for the Study of Philosophy and Animals (Special issue in honor of Tom Re).
    For the past thirty years, the late Tom Regan bucked the trend among secular animal rights philosophers and spoke patiently and persistently to the best angels of religious ethics in a stream of publications that enjoins religious scholars, clergy, and lay people alike to rediscover the resources within their traditions for articulating and living out an animal ethics that is more consistent with their professed values of love, mercy, and justice. My aim in this article is to showcase some of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  3
    Tom Regan on Kind Arguments Against Animal Rights and for Human Rights.Nathan Nobis - 2016 - In Mylan Engel Jr & Gary Comstock (eds.), The Moral Rights of Animals. Lexington Books. pp. 65-80.
    Tom Regan argues that human beings and some non-human animals have moral rights because they are “subjects of lives,” that is, roughly, conscious, sentient beings with an experiential welfare. A prominent critic, Carl Cohen, objects: he argues that only moral agents have rights and so animals, since they are not moral agents, lack rights. An objection to Cohen’s argument is that his theory of rights seems to imply that human beings who are not moral agents have no moral rights, but (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  25
    Filosofia, Tom E ilusão musical em Kant. Da vivificação sonora do ânimo à recepção do Tom da razão.Nuria Sánchez Madrid - 2012 - Trans/Form/Ação 35 (1):47-72.
    O artigo tenciona, primeiramente, enriquecer o estudo da função que o conceito de tom desempenha na ideia kantiana de razão, ao estendê-lo à análise da música como arte dos sons que a Crítica do Juízo contém. Em segundo lugar, propõe-se determinar os motivos pelos quais a matemática se revela incapaz, devido à especificidade do método filosófico e à corporalidade da ecepção musical, respectivamente, de expressar o modo de proceder da razão e da arte dos sons. Finalmente, aponta-se para uma semelhança (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  9
    Thieves of Virtue: When Bioethics Stole Medicine by Tom Koch (Review).Tom L. Beauchamp - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):11-14.
    The principal thesis in this book is that bioethics emerged—in the 1960s through the 1980s—under the influence of philosophers who claimed to have universally valid principles that could steer medicine and research to the solution of ethical problems, including even those arising at the bedside of patients. Tom Koch contends that these philosophers and their allied bioethicists “stole medicine” and its traditional values, substituting a philosophical discourse generally inaccessible to the average person. Philosophers thereby refashioned medical ethics in accordance with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. How We Think Mādhyamikas Think: A Response To Tom Tillemans.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):426-435.
    In his article in this issue, " 'How do Mādhyamikas Think?' Revisited," Tom Tillemans reflects on his earlier article "How do Mādhyamikas Think?" (2009), itself a response to earlier work of ours (Deguchi et al. 2008; Garfield and Priest 2003). There is much we agree with in these non-dogmatic and open-minded essays. Still, we have some disagreements. We begin with a response to Tillemans' first thoughts, and then turn to his second thoughts.Tillemans (2009) maintains that it is wrong to attribute (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22. Epistemic Instrumentalism and Reasons for Belief: A Reply to Tom Kelly's "Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique".Adam Leite - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):456–464.
    Tom Kelly argues that instrumentalist aeeounts of epistemie rationality fail beeause what a person has reason to believe does not depend upon the eontent of his or her goals. However, his argument fails to distinguish questions about what the evidence supports from questions about what a person ought to believe. Once these are distinguished, the instrumentalist ean avoid Kelly’s objeetions. The paperconcludes by sketehing what I take to be the most defensible version of the instrumentalist view.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  23.  3
    Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation Reconsidered Ed. By Daniel Breazeale and Tom Rockmore.F. Scott Scribner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):548-549.
    Interpretation always takes place in the present tense. It is worth reminding ourselves of this, because few philosophical texts or treatises have suffered the rise and fall of the vagaries of their own contemporary Weltanschauung as Fichte's Addresses to the German Nation. Few texts in history have been simultaneously so overestimated and underestimated in their impact and importance as Fichte's Addresses; and therefore few texts can be said to be so misunderstood—and so need in of reassessment. This collection, Fichte's Addresses (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  88
    Review Essay: A Review of Tom Nairn and Paul James, Global Matrix: Nationalism, Globalism and State-Terrorism (London: Pluto, 2005); Jan Nederveen Pieterse, Globalization or Empire? (New York and London: Routledge, 2004); Patrick Hayden and Chamsy El-Ojeili (Eds), Confronting Globalization: Humanity, Justice and the Renewal of Politics (Houndmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005). [REVIEW]Lloyd Cox - 2007 - Thesis Eleven 90 (1):97-111.
    Review Essay: A Review of Tom Nairn and Paul James, Global Matrix: Nationalism, Globalism and State-Terrorism ; Jan Nederveen Pieterse, Globalization or Empire? ; Patrick Hayden and Chamsy el-Ojeili , Confronting Globalization: Humanity, Justice and the Renewal of Politics.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  65
    The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 76 (1):1–24.
    Kant's claim that modality is a 'category' provides an approach to modality to be contrasted with Lewis's reductive analysis. Lewis's position is unsatisfactory, since it depends on an inherently modal conception of a world. This suggests that modality is 'primitive'; and the Kantian position is a prima facie plausible position of this kind, which is filled out by considering the relationship between modality and inference. This provides a context for comparing the Kantian position with Wright's non-cognitivist 'conventionalism'. Wright's position is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26.  64
    What Peeping Tom Did Wrong.John Draeger - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):41-49.
    Voyeurism seems creepy. This paper considers whether these feelings are well-founded. It identifies a variety of ethically troubling features, including harmful consequences, deceit, and the violation of various religious, legal, and conventional norms. Voyeurism is something of a moral misdemeanor that seems worrisome when associated with these other failings. However, because voyeurism remains troubling even in the absence of harm or deceit, we must pay special attention to the ways complex social conventions can be used to show disrespect for others. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  1
    The Inaugural Address: Kantian Modality: Tom Baldwin.Tom Baldwin - 2002 - Supplement to the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76 (1):1-24.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. Principles of Biomedical Ethics / Tom L. Beauchamp, James F. Childress.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    This is an extremely thorough revision of the leading textbook of bioethics. The authors have made many improvements in style, organization, argument and content. These changes reflect advances in the bioethics literature over the past five years. The most dramatic expansions of the text are in the comprehensiveness with which the authors treat different currents in ethical theory and the greater breadth and depth of their discussion of public policy and public health issues. In every chapter, readers will find new (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  32
    Tom Stonier's Response.Tom Stonier - 1999 - World Futures 53 (4):375-376.
  30.  2
    The Rights Approach to Mental Illness: Tom Campbell.Tom Campbell - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:221-253.
    The concept of rights is now so dominant in the language of politics that it is becoming difficult to identify its use with any particular approach to the solution of social problems or to gain a clear picture of its significance, its advantages and its disadvantages as a way of conceptualizing and resolving contentious political issues. None the less there is a perceptible shift towards an emphasis on rights in contemporary politics which many welcome and encourage and others question and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  2
    Time and Truth: The Presentism-Eternalism Debate: Tom Stoneham.Tom Stoneham - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (2):201-218.
    There are many questions we can ask about time, but perhaps the most fundamental is whether there are metaphysically interesting differences between past, present and future events. An eternalist believes in a block universe: past, present and future events are all on an equal footing. A gradualist believes in a growing block: he agrees with the eternalist about the past and the present but not about the future. A presentist believes that what is present has a special status. My first (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  2
    Tom Seppalainen, Review of Through the Rearview Mirror: Historical Reflections on Psychology by John Macnamara. [REVIEW]Tom Seppalainen - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (3):549-551.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  2
    Critical Thinking, Rhetoric, Ideology: Excerpts From an Interview with Tom Bridges.Tom Bridges & Robert Esformes - 1990 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 5 (3):7-8.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  11
    Tom MELS (ed.), Reanimating Places : a Geography of Rhythms.Derek McCormack - forthcoming - Rhuthmos.
    T. Mels (ed.), Reanimating Places : a Geography of Rhythms, Aldershot : Ashgate, 2004, 278 p. Quelques pages sont accessibles ici. For geographers, rhythm is one of the most seductive and elusive of concepts. And, as Tom Mels's expansive introductory essay to this collection demonstrates, it is possible to trace the 'lineage of a geography of rhythms' through various theoretical and empirical trajectories. The content and tone of this volume is, however, dominated by one particular (...) - Recensions.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  5
    Interview: Tom Chappell.Tom Chappell & Craig Cox - 1994 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 8 (1):16-18.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  13
    World Views and Moral Decisions: A Reply to Tom Regan.Don E. Marietta Jr - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (4):369-371.
    Tom Regan (this issue) criticizes my thesis that obligation toward the environment is grounded in a world view and thereby has a moral overridingness which mere interests and desires do not have. He holds that my approach is too subjectivistic. I counter, first, by explaining that phenomenology, which I use in my analysis of moral obligation, is not subjectivistic in the way emotivism or prescriptivism inethics is subjectivistic. Second, I argue that world views are products of learning and experience of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  5
    What We Made: Conversations on Art and Social Cooperation, by Tom Finkelpearl. [REVIEW]Andrea Baldini - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (4):120-124.
    Tom Finkelpearl is a unique figure in contemporary art. He is the executive director of the Queens Museum of Art. However, for decades, he has been a passionate advocate of unconventional artistic practices that have been flourishing outside the boundaries of the mainstream circuit of museums, biennales, art fairs, galleries, and art schools. In recognition of his involvement in promoting nontraditional forms of art, Public Art Dialogue, one of the most important associations devoted to public art, has recently awarded Finkelpearl (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  18
    A New Perspective on Economic Analysis in Health Care?: A Critical Review of 'The Economics of Health Reconsidered' by Tom Rice. [REVIEW]Stephen Jan - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (1):99-106.
    A recently published book, 'The Economics of Health Reconsidered' by Tom Rice, provides a strong critique of the role of markets in health care. Many of the issues of 'market failure' raised by Rice, however, have been, to varying extents, recognised previously in the health economics literature (at least outside the U.S.). What perhaps sets Rice's book apart from previous attempts to document such issues is its elegance and the methodical manner in which this critique is delivered. Significantly the critique (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  15
    Review of Disability Rights and Wrongs by Tom Shakespeare. [REVIEW]S. D. Edwards - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):222-222.
    Tom Shakepeare is an eminent, and somewhat controversial, contributor to disability studies. As he outlines, part of the explanation for his controversial status within that field stems from his engagement with disciplines outside it, including genetics and bioethics. For many in the field of disability studies, no genuine engagement should be sought with scholars in genetics or bioethics because—so the party line goes—these areas of study are inherently opposed to disability rights and otherwise pose genuine threats to the status of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  7
    Through the Pleasure Dome, on Lux: A Decade of Artists' Film and Video , Edited by Steve Reinke and Tom Taylor.Kyle Harris - 2003 - Film-Philosophy 7 (7).
    _Lux: A Decade of Artists' Film and Video_ Edited by Steve Reinke and Tom Taylor Toronto: YYZ Books, 2000 ISBN 0-920397-26-3 373 pp.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  1
    Revisiting Tom Tom: Performative Anamnesis and Autonomous Vision in Ken Jacobs’ Appropriations of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son.Edwin Carels - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-14.
    In 1969 the American avant-garde filmmaker Ken Jacobs gained wide recognition with a two-hour long interpretation of a 1905 silent short film. Ever since, the artist has kept on revisiting the same material, each time with a different technological approach. Originally hailed as a prime example of structural filmmaking, Jacobs’ more recent variations on the theme of Tom Tom the Piper’s Son beg for a broader understanding of his methods and the meanings implied. To gain a deeper insight in this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  4
    Rumo a uma Filosofia da Religião em tom Pós-metafísico. Diálogos com Habermas e Rorty (Towards a philosophy of religion in a post-metaphysical tone. Dialogue with Habermas and Rorty) - DOI: DOI – 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n16p12. [REVIEW]Julio Paulo Tavares Zabatiero - 2010 - Horizonte 8 (16):12-32.
    Este artigo consiste em um diálogo com textos de Jürgen Habermas e Richard Rorty referentes ao tema da religião e seu lugar na sociedade contemporânea. Em vista do tom dialogal, as citações desses autores são relativamente numerosas, a fim de que as suas vozes sobressaiam no texto. O objetivo do diálogo é extrair pistas para a construção de uma filosofia da religião em tom pós-metafísico, ou não fundacional. Não é um texto exaustivo, mas sugestivo. Não se propõe a tecer críticas (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  1
    The Right to Privacy and the Right to Die: TOM L. BEAUCHAMP.Tom L. Beauchamp - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):276-292.
    Western ethics and law have been slow to come to conclusions about the right to choose the time and manner of one's death. However, policies, practices, and legal precedents have evolved quickly in the last quarter of the twentieth century, from the forgoing of respirators to the use of Do Not Resuscitate orders, to the forgoing of all medical technologies, and now, in one U.S. state, to legalized physician-assisted suicide. The sweep of history—from the Quinlan case in New Jersey to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    Epistemic Instrumentalism and Reasons for Belief: A Reply to Tom Kelly’s “Epistemic Rationality as Instrumental Rationality: A Critique”.Leite Adam - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (2):456-464.
    Tom Kelly argues that instrumentalist aeeounts of epistemie rationality fail beeause what a person has reason to believe does not depend upon the eontent of his or her goals. However, his argument fails to distinguish questions about what the evidence supports from questions about what a person ought to believe. Once these are distinguished, the instrumentalist ean avoid Kelly’s objeetions. The paperconcludes by sketehing what I take to be the most defensible version of the instrumentalist view.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  1
    The Use of Ulster Speech by Michael Longley and Tom Paulin.Joanna Kruczkowska - 2011 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 1 (1):239-251.
    The Use of Ulster Speech by Michael Longley and Tom Paulin The article examines the application and exploration of Ulster dialects in the work of two poets of Northern Irish Protestant background, Tom Paulin and Michael Longley. It depicts Paulin's attitude to the past and the present of their community of origin, the former positive and the latter negative, which is responsible for the ambiguities in his use of and his comments on the local speech. Both poets employ the vernacular (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  9
    A Journalism of Philosophy: A Book Review by Tom Brislin. [REVIEW]Tom Brislin - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (1):49 – 51.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  7
    An Apt Punishment for Tom Joad: (Re)Identifying Tom Joad for a Moral Judgment Based on the Pra.Eddy Wilson - 1991 - Journal of Social Philosophy 22 (2):81-93.
    SummaryOur basic intuition seems to suggest that the moral biography of an individual matters in our treatment of the individual. We do keep criminal records on file, and we do care about the moral progress of individuals. At times our desire to fix responsibility seems too strong, and in our zeal we invent a definite, metaphysical character on which to pin crimes. However, some moral philosophers have tried to redirect our attention to affix responsibility in a way that attends to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  7
    Selecting Barrenness - A Response From Tom Shakespeare.Tom Shakespeare - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):22-24.
    A response to Kavita Shah's article Selecting Barrenness.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  9
    A Spot News Approach to Newsroom Ethics: A Book Review by Tom Bivins. [REVIEW]Tom Bivins - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (3):185 – 187.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  6
    Is Tom Shakespeare Disabled?T. Koch - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (1):18-20.
    Is Tom Shakespeare disabled, or simply distinct in stature? And if the latter, what makes that distinction important?For more than a decade, the British sociologist has been a critical voice in the sociology of difference. The son of a physician with achondroplasia “widely admired as a doctor and as a disabled role model” ,1 Shakespeare fils also has achondroplasia, is the father of children with the condition and, like his father, is professionally successful. As his book’s back cover announces, Shakespeare (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000