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Tom Walker [19]Tom Harrison and David Walker [1]
  1. Respecting Autonomy Without Disclosing Information.Tom Walker - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (7):388-394.
    There is widespread agreement that it would be both morally and legally wrong to treat a competent patient, or to carry out research with a competent participant, without the voluntary consent of that patient or research participant. Furthermore, in medical ethics it is generally taken that that consent must be informed. The most widely given reason for this has been that informed consent is needed to respect the patient’s or research participant’s autonomy. In this article I set out to challenge (...)
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  2.  47
    Informed Consent and the Requirement to Ensure Understanding.Tom Walker - 2012 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 29 (1):50-62.
    It is generally held that doctors and researchers have an obligation to obtain informed consent. Over time there has been a move in relation to this obligation from a requirement to disclose information to a requirement to ensure that that information is understood. Whilst this change has been resisted, in this article I argue that both sides on this matter are mistaken. When investigating what information is needed for consent to be informed we might be trying to determine what information (...)
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  3.  38
    Ethical Perspectives on Advances in Biogerontology.Jean Woo, David Archard, Derrick Au, Sara Bergstresser, Alexandre Erler, Timothy Kwok, John Newman, Raymond Tong & Tom Walker - 2019 - Aging Medicine 2 (2):99-103.
    Worldwide populations are aging with economic development as a result of public health initiatives and advances in therapeutic discoveries. Since 1850, life expectancy has advanced by 1 year for every four. Accompanying this change is the rapid development of anti‐aging science. There are three schools of thought in the field of aging science. One perspective is the life course approach, which considers that aging is a good and natural process to be embraced as a necessary and positive aspect of life, (...)
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  4.  71
    Who Do We Treat First When Resources Are Scarce?Tom Walker - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):200-211.
    In a health service with limited resources we must make decisions about who to treat first. In this paper I develop a version of the restoration argument according to which those whose need for resources is a consequence of their voluntary choices should receive lower priority when it comes to health care. I then consider three possible problems for this argument based on those that have been raised against other theories of this type: that we don't know in a particular (...)
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  5.  25
    Ageing, Justice and Resource Allocation.Tom Walker - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (6):348-352.
    Around the world, the population is ageing in ways that pose new challenges for healthcare providers. To date these have mostly been formulated in terms of challenges created by increasing costs, and the focus has been squarely on life-prolonging treatments. However, this focus ignores the ways in which many older people require life-enhancing treatments to counteract the effects of physical and mental decline. This paper argues that in doing so it misses important aspects of what justice requires when it comes (...)
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  6.  97
    The Rule of Rescue in Clinical Practice.Jonathan Hughes & Tom Walker - 2009 - Clinical Ethics 4 (1):50-54.
    People often have a strong intuitive sense that we ought to rescue those in serious need, even in cases where we could produce better outcomes by acting in other ways. It has become common in such cases to refer to this as the Rule of Rescue. Within the medical field this rule has predominantly been discussed in relation to decisions about whether to fund particular treatments. Whilst in this setting the arguments in favour of the Rule of Rescue have generally (...)
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  7.  56
    Ulysses Contracts in Medicine.Tom Walker - 2012 - Law and Philosophy 31 (1):77-98.
    Ulysses contracts are a method by which one person binds himself by agreeing to be bound by others. In medicine such contracts have primarily been discussed as ways of treating people with episodic mental illnesses, where the features of the illness are such that they now judge that they will refuse treatment at the time it is needed. Enforcing Ulysses contracts in these circumstances would require medical professionals to override the express refusal of the patient at the time treatment is (...)
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  8.  24
    The Obligation to Provide Information Where Valid Consent is Not Needed.Tom Walker - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (4):501-524.
    Within medical ethics it is widely agreed both that it would be morally wrong to give a competent patient medical treatment without his consent, and that for his agreement to treatment to constitute valid consent it needs to meet certain criteria. In illustrating why these requirements are needed it is common to use treatments that involve a healthcare professional doing something to the patient's body—for example, performing surgery, giving an injection, or taking a blood sample or swab (see, for example, (...)
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  9.  6
    Value of Choice.Tom Walker - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106067.
    Accounts of the value of patient choice in contemporary medical ethics typically focus on the act of choosing. Being the one to choose, it is argued, can be valuable either because it enables one to bring about desired outcomes, or because it is a way of enacting one’s autonomy. This paper argues that all such accounts miss something important. In some circumstances, it is having the opportunity to choose, not the act of choosing, that is valuable. That is because in (...)
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  10.  12
    Ethics and Chronic Illness.Tom Walker - 2019 - Routledge.
    Healthcare ethics has to date had very little to say about the treatment of chronic illness. That is problematic. Chronic illness differs from other illnesses in that: 1. in most cases it cannot be cured; 2. patients can live with it for many years; and 3. its day to day management is typically carried out, not by healthcare professionals, but by the patient and/or members of their family. These features problematise key distinctions that underlie much existing work in healthcare ethics (...)
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  11.  12
    Full Autonomy, Substantial Autonomy, and Neuroscience.Tom Walker - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (3):56-57.
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  12.  10
    Taking a Systems Approach to Chronic Illness in Old Age.Tom Walker - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S3):S37-S40.
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  13.  28
    Guest Editorial.Sheelagh Mcguinness, Tom Walker & Stephen Wilkinson - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):4-7.
  14.  22
    Paternalism and Populations.Tom Walker - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (1):46-54.
    It is relatively uncontroversial that some public health policies are paternalistic. Furthermore, that they are paternalistic is often taken to show that they are morally wrong. In this article I challenge this position. The article starts by arguing that given standard definitions of paternalism it is unclear why such policies count as paternalistic. Whilst it might appear that they impose restrictions on what individuals can, or cannot, do for their own good, this is not the case. The reason for this (...)
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  15.  43
    Giving Addicts Their Drug of Choice: The Problem of Consent.Tom Walker - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (6):314–320.
    Researchers working on drug addiction may, for a variety of reasons, want to carry out research which involves giving addicts their drug of choice. In carrying out this research consent needs to be obtained from those addicts recruited to participate in it. Concerns have been raised about whether or not such addicts are able to give this consent. Despite their differences, however, both sides in this debate appear to be agreed that the way to resolve this issue is to determine (...)
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  16.  31
    Could Sexual Selection Have Made Us Psychological Altruists.Tom Walker - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (1):153-162.
    Psychological altruism (being motivated by the needs of others) has a tendency to produce behaviour that is costly in evolutionary terms. How, then, could the capacity for psychological altruism evolve? One suggestion is that it is the result of sexual selection. There are, however, two problems that face such an account: first, it is not clear that the resulting behaviour would be altruistic in the relevant sense, and second, it does not seem to fit with key features of our actual (...)
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  17.  6
    Could Sexual Selection Have Made Us Psychological Altruists?Tom Walker - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (1):153-162.
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  18.  3
    The Ethics of Public Health Volumes I and II, Edited by Michael Freeman. [REVIEW]Tom Walker - 2009 - Genomics, Society and Policy 5 (3):77-80.
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  19.  6
    Guest Editorial - A Complex Web of Questions.Sheelagh Mcguinness, Tom Walker & Stephen Wilkinson - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):4-7.