6 found
Order:
  1.  39
    Voluntary Action and Rational Sin in Anselm of Canterbury.Tomas Ekenberg - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):215-230.
    Anselm of Canterbury holds that freedom of the will is a necessary condition for moral responsibility. This condition, however, turns out to be trivially fulfilled by all rational creatures at all times. In order to clarify the necessary conditions for moral responsibility, we must look more widely at his discussion of the nature of the will and of willed action. In this paper, I examine his theory of voluntariness by clarifying his account of the sin of Satan in De casu (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  2
    Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy.Jari Kaukua & Tomas Ekenberg (eds.) - 2016 - Springer.
    This book is a collection of studies on topics related to subjectivity and selfhood in medieval and early modern philosophy. The individual contributions approach the theme from a number of angles varying from cognitive and moral psychology to metaphysics and epistemology. Instead of a complete overview on the historical period, the book provides detailed glimpses into some of the most important figures of the period, such as Augustine, Avicenna, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz and Hume. The questions addressed include the ethical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3. Subjectivity, Selfhood and Agency in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy (Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind 16).Tomas Ekenberg, Jari Kauka & Taneli Kukkonen (eds.) - 2016
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Power and Activity in Early Medieval Philosophy.Tomas Ekenberg - 2009 - In Juhani Pietarinen & Valtteri Viljanen (eds.), The World as Active Power: Studies in the History of European Reason. Brill.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  31
    Free Will and Free Action in Anselm of Canterbury.Tomas Ekenberg - 2005 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 22 (4):301 - 318.
    Free Will and Free Action in Anselm of Canterbury.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  13
    Voluntarism, Intellectualism, and Anselm on Motivation.Tomas Ekenberg - 2016 - Philosophical Topics 44 (1):59-74.
    According to the standard reading of Anselm’s De casu diaboli 12 through 14, the angels are morally responsible only if their own wills are in a radical way within their own power. By giving to angels two wills, i.e., two basic inclinations or volitional dispositions, Anselm’s God yields to the angels room for a free choice—indeed imparts on them the necessity of such a choice: in the case where an angel’s own happiness is incommensurable with justice, the angel must choose (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark