8 found
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  1.  28
    Do people with social anxiety feel anxious about interacting with a robot?Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Sachie Yamada - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (2):381-390.
    To investigate whether people with social anxiety have less actual and “anticipatory” anxiety when interacting with a robot compared to interacting with a person, we conducted a 2 × 2 psychological experiment with two factors: social anxiety and interaction partner. The experiment was conducted in a counseling setting where a participant played the role of a client and the robot or the confederate played the role of a counselor. First, we measured the participants’ social anxiety using the Social Avoidance and (...)
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  2. The Influence of People’s Culture and Prior Experiences with Aibo on Their Attitude Towards Robots.Christoph Bartneck, Tomohiro Suzuki, Takayuki Kanda & Tatsuya Nomura - 2007 - AI and Society 21 (1-2):217-230.
    This paper presents a cross-cultural study on peoples’ negative attitude toward robots. 467 participants from seven different countries filled in the negative attitude towards robots scale survey which consists of 14 questions in three clusters: attitude towards the interaction with robots, attitude towards social influence of robots and attitude towards emotions in interaction with robots. Around one half of them were recruited at local universities and the other half was approached through Aibo online communities. The participants’ cultural background had a (...)
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  3. Experimental Investigation Into Influence of Negative Attitudes Toward Robots on Human–Robot Interaction.Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda & Tomohiro Suzuki - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (2):138-150.
    Negative attitudes toward robots are considered as one of the psychological factors preventing humans from interacting with robots in the daily life. To verify their influence on humans‘ behaviors toward robots, we designed and executed experiments where subjects interacted with Robovie, which is being developed as a platform for research on the possibility of communication robots. This paper reports and discusses the results of these experiments on correlation between subjects’ negative attitudes and their behaviors toward robots. Moreover, it discusses influences (...)
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  4.  41
    Measurement of Negative Attitudes Toward Robots.Tatsuya Nomura, Tomohiro Suzuki, Takayuki Kanda & Kensuke Kato - 2006 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 7 (3):437-454.
    A great deal of research has been performed recently on robots that feature functions for communicating with humans in daily life, i.e., communication robots. We consider it important to develop methods to measure humans’ attitudes and emotions that may prevent them from interaction with communication robots, as indices to study short-term and long-term interaction between humans and communication robots. This study is aimed at exploring the influence of negative attitudes toward robots, focusing on applications of communication robots to daily-life services. (...)
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  5.  5
    Gender preferences for robots and gender equality orientation in communication situations.Tomohiro Suzuki & Tatsuya Nomura - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-10.
    The individual physical appearances of robots are considered significant, similar to the way that those of humans are. We investigated whether users prefer robots with male or female physical appearances for use in daily communication situations and whether egalitarian gender role attitudes are related to this preference. One thousand adult men and women aged 20–60 participated in the questionnaire survey. The results of our study showed that in most situations and for most subjects, “males” was not selected and “females” or (...)
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  6.  29
    Age Differences and Images of Robots: Social Survey in Japan.Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Kensuke Kato - 2009 - Interaction Studies 10 (3):374-391.
  7.  19
    Age Differences and Images of Robots: Social Survey in Japan.Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Kensuke Kato - 2009 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 10 (3):374-391.
  8.  3
    Age Differences and Images of Robots.Tatsuya Nomura, Takayuki Kanda, Tomohiro Suzuki & Kensuke Kato - 2009 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 10 (3):374-391.
    In order to investigate the influence of participants’ age on their image of robots in Japan, a pilot research was completed by 371 visitors at a robot exhibition held at a commercial facility in Japan, based on the questionnaire consisting of four open-ended questions. The comparison of younger, adult, and elderly groups, found that: in the younger age group, images of robots are ambiguous about near future assumptions, preferences, and antipathy, the adult group assumes that communication robots will appear in (...)
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