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  1.  72
    Japan's Top-Down Policy Process to Dispatch the SDF to Iraq.Tomohito Shinoda - 2006 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 7 (1):71-91.
    In July 2003, Prime Minister Koizumi successfully passed the legislation to dispatch ground SDF units to Iraq in the Diet. His top-down policy process was completely different from Japan's traditional bottom-up system, which Aurelia George Mulgan calls the in which the bureaucrats in the ministries play a central role with the LDP being the only political power to negotiate with them. Mulgan also argues that the system has not changed despite recent institutional changes. On the contrary, this paper illustrates how (...)
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  2.  42
    DPJ's Political Leadership in Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.Tomohito Shinoda - 2013 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 14 (2):243-259.
    The 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami damaged the nuclear reactors in Fukushima. Prime Minister Naoto Kan took this crisis seriously, and made himself personally involved with damage control, especially during the first week. This study examines the responses to the incident by the prime minister's office.
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  3.  24
    Japan's Parliamentary Confrontation on the Post-Cold War National Security Policies.Tomohito Shinoda - 2009 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 10 (3):267-287.
    In the fall 2007 Diet session, the largest opposition Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) showed strong opposition against the government's proposal to continue the Self-Defense Forces (SDF) refueling operations to support maritime inspections in the Indian Ocean. In order to evaluate this parliamentary confrontation, the article compares the handling of this issue with the six past major post-Cold War national security policies. The DPJ constantly presented its own legislative proposals in order to participate in Diet deliberation. DPJ's counter proposals, however, (...)
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  4.  21
    Becoming More Realistic in the Post-Cold War: Japan's Changing Media and Public Opinion on National Security.Tomohito Shinoda - 2007 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 8 (2):171-190.
    After the collapse of the Cold War system, Japan became more active in contributing to international peace and security. Especially under the Koizumi administration, Japan successfully passed major pieces of national security legislation, such as the 2001 Anti-Terrorism and the 2003 Iraq Special Measure Laws, in a timely manner. A changing international security environment in the Cold War transformed Japan's media and public opinion to a more realistic one, which supported Koizumi's active national security policy and changed the dynamics of (...)
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  5.  18
    Searching for a Dream Plan: Two-Level Game Analysis of the Futenma Relocation Issue Under the Hatoyama Cabinet.Tomohito Shinoda - 2014 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 15 (1):51-67.
    Employing a two-level game framework, this study examines the decision-making process of the Hatoyama government on the replacement of the US Marine air base in Futenma, Okinawa. Before reaching the final decision to revert to the existing plan of relocating it to Nago City, the cabinet members explored different possible alternatives. Prime Minister Hatoyama simultaneously pursued different international and domestic goals. Misperception and miscommunication between Tokyo and Washington were at play. A two-level game framework provides a clear picture of what (...)
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  6.  11
    Governing From the Centre: Core Executive Capacity in Britain and Japan.Ian Holliday & Tomohito Shinoda - 2002 - Japanese Journal of Political Science 3 (1):91-111.
    The article contributes to debates about core executive capacity by analyzing the British and Japanese cases. First it examines the historical development, contemporary structures and current operations of the two cases. Then it compares their performance in five key areas: overseeing government policy in the domestic sphere; overseeing government policy in the external sphere; managing executive relations with the legislature; overseeing public finances; and managing public relations. It finds that the performance of the two systems is variable both internally across (...)
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