9 found
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  1.  71
    The Construction of Bacteriophage as Bacterial Virus: Linking Endogenous and Exogenous Thought Styles.Ton Van Helvoort - 1994 - Journal of the History of Biology 27 (1):91-139.
  2.  12
    History of Virus Research in the Twentieth Century: The Problem of Conceptual Continuity.Ton van Helvoort - 1994 - History of Science 32 (96):185-235.
  3.  32
    The Controversy Between John H. Northrop and Max Delbrück on the Formation of Bacteriophage: Bacterial Synthesis or Autonomous Multiplication?Ton van Helvoort - 1992 - Annals of Science 49 (6):545-575.
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  4.  12
    How Seeing Became Knowing: The Role of the Electron Microscope in Shaping the Modern Definition of Viruses.Ton van Helvoort & Neeraja Sankaran - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):125-160.
    This paper examines the vital role played by electron microscopy toward the modern definition of viruses, as formulated in the late 1950s. Before the 1930s viruses could neither be visualized by available technologies nor grown in artificial media. As such they were usually identified by their ability to cause diseases in their hosts and defined in such negative terms as “ultramicroscopic” or invisible infectious agents that could not be cultivated outside living cells. The invention of the electron microscope, with magnification (...)
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  5.  6
    ‘Purifying’ Science: E. C. Slater and Postwar Biochemistry in the Netherlands.Ton van Helvoort - 2003 - History of Science 41 (1):1-34.
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  6.  34
    What is a Virus? The Case of Tobacco Mosaic Disease.Ton van Helvoort - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (4):557-588.
    It is argued that the major interpretations of tobacco mosaic virus which were suggested in the first half of the 20th century can be ordered into two conflicting approaches. It is shown that explaining the existence of these different approaches as views from different perspectives, is a mistaken metaphor. The different approaches resulted in the "construction" of different research objects as answers to the questions "What is a virus"? Although these different conceptions did exclude each other, they co-existed because of (...)
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  7.  6
    A Bacteriological Paradigm in Influenza Research in the First Half of the Twentieth Century.Ton van Helvoort - 1993 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 15 (1):3 - 21.
    Scholars have argued that the beginning of virology can be dated from the end of the 19th century: the discovery that some infectious agents could pass through ultrafilters produced a criterium to distinguish ultrafilterable viruses from infectious agents that are not filterable, e.g. bacteria. A filterable agent, claimed to be the cause of human influenza, was isolated in 1933. It will be argued in this paper, however, that the influence of a bacteriological paradigm on influenza research in the first half (...)
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  8.  4
    A Century of Research Into the Cause of Cancer: Is the New Oncogene Paradigm Revolutionary?Ton van Helvoort - 1999 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 21 (3):293 - 330.
    Contemporary oncological research is predominantly characterised by genetic explanations, a situation which may be briefly denoted as the oncogene paradigm. This essay discusses why the new paradigm was perceived so attractive that it could take over the whole field of oncology within a time-span of less than two decades. It is argued that the revolutionary character of the oncogene paradigm stems from the fact that it transcends a dichotomy which has kept experimental cancer research divided for more than three quarters (...)
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  9.  9
    ‘Virus & Cancer Studies’—Still Fascinating After All These Years.Ton van Helvoort - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:258-259.
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