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Tony Pitson
University of Stirling
  1.  57
    The Miseries of Life: Hume and the Problem of Evil.Tony Pitson - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (1):89-114.
    My topic is Hume’s treatment of the problem of evil in the Dialogues and elsewhere in his philosophical writings. The aim is to provide an overall view of Hume’s position which also takes account of the historical debate associated with the problem of evil. Critical and interpretative issues will also be addressed. We shall see that Hume is concerned mainly with a particular form of the evidential argument from evil which appears especially damaging to theistic belief in so far as (...)
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  2.  14
    Hume and Humanity as ‘the Foundation of Morals’.Tony Pitson - 2019 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17 (1):39-59.
    There is an ongoing debate as to whether there is a major difference between Hume's accounts of morality in the Treatise and the second Enquiry. This has tended to focus on the role of sympathy in each case, but more recently the greater emphasis on humanity in the Enquiry as compared with the Treatise has been used to support a non-reconciliation view of the relation between these accounts. So far as humanity's role in relation to the moral sentiments is concerned, (...)
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  3. Sympathy and Other Selves.Tony Pitson - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (2):255-271.
  4.  58
    George Campbell's Critique of Hume on Testimony.Tony Pitson - 2006 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (1):1-15.
    Abstract At stake in the dispute between Campbell and Hume is the basis for our acceptance of testimony. Campbell argues that, contrary to Hume, our acceptance of testimony is prior to experience, while Hume continues to maintain that the appropriation through testimony of the experience of others depends ultimately on one's own experience. I argue that Hume's remarks about testimony provide a non-circular account of the process by which the experience of others may become one's own; and I suggest that (...)
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  5.  18
    Liberty, Necessity, and the Will.Tony Pitson - 2006 - In Saul Traiger (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Hume's Treatise. Blackwell. pp. 216--231.
  6.  33
    Hume on Morals and Animals.Tony Pitson - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):639 – 655.
  7.  48
    Skeptical Realism and Hume on the Self.Tony Pitson - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (1):37-59.
    Ourself, independent of the perception of every other object, is in reality nothing. An issue which has become prominent in recent discussions of Hume on personal identity 1 concerns the nature of the account to be found there of the mind or self.2 Hume famously rejects the idea of the self as something perfectly identical and simple in favor of the view that each of us is “nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with (...)
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  8. Hume's Philosophy of the Self.Tony Pitson - 2002 - Routledge.
    First Published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
     
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  9.  57
    Sure of Your Self?Tony Pitson - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):90-95.
    We might be inclined to think of the mind as a kind of theatre in which our thoughts and feelings – or “perceptions” – make their appearance; but if so we are misled, for the mind is constituted by its perceptions.
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  10.  56
    The Evident Connexion: Hume on Personal Identity. By Galen Strawson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, Pp. Xii + 165. ISBN 9780199608508. [REVIEW]Tony Pitson - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (1):127-132.
  11.  65
    The Dispositional Account of Colour.Tony Pitson - 1997 - Philosophia 25 (1-4):247-266.
    The dispositional account of colour has recently come under fire from a number of different directions (reflecting the various alternative options mentioned at the beginning). I believe that in the above I have dealt with the principal objections raised against this account by those who reject it. I cannot pretend to have established that the account is true; but if I am right about the failure of the objections I have discussed, and the difficulites of alternative accounts of colour, then (...)
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  12.  12
    Sure of Your Self?Tony Pitson - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 54:90-95.
    We might be inclined to think of the mind as a kind of theatre in which our thoughts and feelings – or “perceptions” – make their appearance; but if so we are misled, for the mind is constituted by its perceptions.
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