Results for 'Tool use'

999 found
Order:
  1. Tool Use and Causal Cognition: An Introduction.Teresa McCormack, Christoph Hoerl & Stephen Andrew Butterfill - 2011 - In Teresa McCormack, Christoph Hoerl & Stephen Andrew Butterfill (eds.), Tool Use and Causal Cognition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-17.
    This chapter begins with a discussion of the significance of studies of aspects of tool use in understanding causal cognition. It argues that tool use studies reveal the most basic type or causal understanding being put to use, in a way that studies that focus on learning statistical relationships between cause and effect or studies of perceptual causation do not. An overview of the subsequent chapters is also presented.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. The Cognitive Bases of Human Tool Use.Krist Vaesen - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):203-262.
    This article has two goals. First, it synthesizes and critically assesses current scientific knowledge about the cognitive bases of human tool use. Second, it shows how the cognitive traits reviewed help to explain why technological accumulation evolved so markedly in humans, and so modestly in apes.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  3.  49
    Tool Use and Causal Cognition.Teresa McCormack, Christoph Hoerl & Stephen Butterfill (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    What cognitive abilities underpin the use of tools, and how are tools and their properties represented or understood by tool-users? Does the study of tool use provide us with a unique or distinctive source of information about the causal cognition of tool-users? -/- Tool use is a topic of major interest to all those interested in animal cognition, because it implies that the animal has knowledge of the relationship between objects and their effects. There are countless (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  4.  62
    Tool Use, Planning and Future Thinking in Children and Animals.Teresa McCormack & Christoph Hoerl - 2011 - In Teresa McCormack, Christoph Hoerl & Stephen Butterfill (eds.), Tool use and causal cognition. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 129-147.
    This chapter considers in what sense, if any, planning and future thinking is involved both in the sort of behaviour examined by McCarty et al. (1999) and in the sort of behaviour measured by researchers creating versions of Tulving's spoon test. It argues that mature human planning and future thinking involves a particular type of temporal cognition, and that there are reasons to be doubtful as to whether either of those two approaches actually assesses this type of cognition. To anticipate, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  6
    A Philosopher Looks at Tool Use and Causal Understanding.James Woodward - unknown
    This paper explores some general questions about the sorts of abilities that are involved in tool use and “causal cognition”, both in humans and in non-human primates. An attempt is made to relate the empirical literature on these topics to various philosophical theories of causation.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6.  66
    Cognition and Tool Use.Beth Preston - 1998 - Mind and Language 13 (4):513–547.
    Tool use rivals language as an important domain of cognitive phenomena, and so as a source of insight into the nature of cognition in general. But the favoured current definition of tool use is inadequate because it does not carve the phenomena of interest at the joints. Heidegger's notion of equipment provides a more adequate theoretical framework. But Heidegger's account leads directly to a non-individualist view of the nature of cognition. Thus non-individualism is supported by concrete considerations about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  7.  5
    Expert Tool Use: A Phenomenological Analysis of Processes of Incorporation in the Case of Elite Rope Skipping.Kathrine Liedtke Thorndahl & Susanne Ravn - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (3):310-324.
    According to some phenomenologists, a tool can be experienced as incorporated when, as a result of habitual use or deliberate practice, someone is able to manipulate it without conscious effort. In this article, we specifically focus on the experience of expertise tool use in elite sport. Based on a case study of elite rope skipping, we argue that the phenomenological concept of incorporation does not suffice to adequately describe how expert tool users feel when interacting with their (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8.  24
    Tool Use Induces Complex and Flexible Plasticity of Human Body Representations.Matthew R. Longo & Andrea Serino - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):229 - 230.
    Plasticity of body representation fundamentally underpins human tool use. Recent studies have demonstrated remarkably complex plasticity of body representation in humans, showing that such plasticity (1) occurs flexibly across multiple time scales and (2) involves multiple body representations responding differently to tool use. Such findings reveal remarkable sophistication of body plasticity in humans, suggesting that Vaesen may overestimate the similarity of such mechanisms in humans and non-human primates.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  9.  14
    An Area Specifically Devoted to Tool Use in Human Left Inferior Parietal Lobule.Guy A. Orban & Giacomo Rizzolatti - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):234-234.
    A comparative fMRI study by Peeters et al. (2009) provided evidence that a specific sector of left inferior parietal lobule is devoted to tool use in humans, but not in monkeys. We propose that this area represents the neural substrate of the human capacity to understand tool use by using causal reasoning.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  19
    Thinking Through Tools: What Can Tool-Use Tell Us About Distributed Cognition?Chris Baber - 2015 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 41 (1):25-40.
    In this paper, I question the notion that tool-use must be driven by an internal representation which specifies the “motor program” enacted in the behaviour of the tool-user. Rather, it makes more sense to define tool-use in terms of characteristics of the dynamics of this behaviour. As the behaviour needs to be adjusted to suit changes in context, so there is unlikely to be a one-to-one, linear mapping between an action and its effect. Thus, tool-use can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. Tool Use and the Representation of Peripersonal Space in Humans.Charles Spence - 2011 - In Teresa McCormack, Christoph Hoerl & Stephen Andrew Butterfill (eds.), Tool Use and Causal Cognition. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  12
    Childhood and Advances in Human Tool Use.Mark Nielsen - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):232-233.
    Human life history incorporates childhood, a lengthy post-weaning period of dependency. This species-specific period provides an opportunity for extensive learning and for sophisticated cultural behaviors to develop, including crucial tool use skills. Although I agree that no individual cognitive trait singularly differentiates humans from other animals, I suggest here that without childhood, the traits that are key to human tool use would not emerge.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  9
    Can Object Affordances Impact on Human Social Learning of Tool Use?Pierre O. Jacquet, Alessia Tessari, Ferdinand Binkofski & Anna M. Borghi - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):227-228.
    The author describes and sociocognitive skills that he argues as being necessary for tool use. We propose that those skills could be based on simpler detection systems humans could share with other animal tool users. More specifically, we discuss the impact of object affordances on the understanding and the social learning of tool use.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  10
    Keas Rely on Social Information in a Tool Use Task but Abandon It in Favour of Overt Exploration.Gyula Koppany Gajdon, Laurent Amann & Ludwig Huber - 2011 - Interaction Studies 12 (2):304-323.
    To what extent do keas, Nestor notabilis , learn from each other? We tested eighteen captive keas, New Zealand parrots, in a tool use task involving visual feature discrimination and social learning. The keas were presented with two adjacent tubes, each containing a physically distinct baited platform. One platform could be collapsed by insertion of a block into the tube to release the bait; the other platform could not be collapsed. In contrast to birds that acted on their own (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  38
    What Exists in the Environment That Motivates the Emergence, Transmission, and Sophistication of Tool Use?Tetsushi Nonaka & Krist Vaesen - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):233.
    In his attempt to find cognitive traits that set humans apart from nonhuman primates with respect to tool use, Vaesen overlooks the primacy of the environment toward the use of which behavior evolves. The occurrence of a particular behavior is a result of how that behavior has evolved in a complex and changing environment selected by a unique population.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  10
    Theoretical Deliberations on "Regulation as Productive Tool Use".Erik Axel - 2003 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 5 (1):31-46.
    This paper is discusses some central points in a dissertation for the degree of dr. phil., "Regulation as Productive Tool Use - a Participatory Observation in the Control Room of a District Heating System." An earlier version of the paper was presented by the author as part of the defense of the dissertation at Roskilde University Center June 14 2002. As suggested by the title, the dissertation was an empirical study of regulation in a control room. The object of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  1
    Attention and Tool-Use in the Evolution of Language.Ingar Brinck - unknown
    It is argued that the capacity to focus attention is crucial for intentional communication. Intentional communication is goal-intended; directed at changing mental states and as a consequence behaviour; about a referential object common to sender and recipient; and about objects that may be context-and referent-independent. Three different kinds of attention is discerned: scanning, attention attraction, and attention-focusing. The focus of attention can, depending on the abilities of the subject, be on objects or subjects that either are contextual or stable, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  15
    Tool Use and Constructions.Michael A. Arbib - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):218-219.
    We examine tool use in relation to the capacity of animals for construction, contrasting tools and nests; place human tool use in a more general problem-solving context, revisiting the body schema in the process; and relate the evolution of language and of tool use.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  11
    Cultural Intelligence is Key to Explaining Human Tool Use.Claudio Tennie & Harriet Over - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):242-243.
    Contrary to Vaesen, we argue that a small number of key traits are sufficient to explain modern human tool use. Here we outline and defend the cultural intelligence (CI) hypothesis. In doing so, we critically re-examine the role of social transmission in explaining human tool use.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  10
    Tool-Use Leads to Bodily Extension, but Not Bodily Incorporation: The Limits of Mind-as-It-Could-Be?T. Froese - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 9 (1):86-87.
    Open peer commentary on the article “Investigating Extended Embodiment Using a Computational Model and Human Experimentation” by Yuki Sato, Hiroyuki Iizuka & Takashi Ikegami. Upshot: Sato and colleagues make use of an innovative method that combines robotics modeling and psychological experimentation to investigate how tool use affects our living and lived embodiment. I situate their approach in a general shift from robotics to human-computer interface studies in enactive cognitive science, and speculate about the necessary conditions for the bodily incorporation (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  9
    The Role of Executive Control in Tool Use.Gijsbert Stoet & Lawrence H. Snyder - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):240-241.
    Comparing cognitive functions between humans and nonhuman primates is helpful for understanding human tool use. We comment on the latest insights from comparative research on executive control functions. Based on our own work, we discuss how even a mental function in which non-human primates outperform humans might have played a key role in the development of tool use.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  6
    Human Tool-Use: A Causal Role in Plasticity of Bodily and Spatial Representations.L. Cardinali, C. Brozzoli, F. Frassinetti, Alice C. Roy & A. Farnè - 2011 - In Teresa McCormack, Christoph Hoerl & Stephen Andrew Butterfill (eds.), Tool Use and Causal Cognition. Oxford University Press.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  32
    Bipedalism, Canine Tooth Reduction, and Obligatory Tool Use.C. Loring Brace - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):507-508.
    Bipedalism in the earliest hominid specimens is always accompanied by the reduction of projecting canine teeth. Body size is smaller than chimpanzees or humans, but molar teeth are markedly larger. Use of a pointed stick for defensive purposes on the one hand, and digging for USOs on the other, may be why bipedalism was selected for. Passing such learned behavior to the next generation may have played a role in selecting for language.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  25
    Linguistically Mediated Tool Use and Exchange by Chimpanzees.E. Sue Savage-Rumbaugh, Duane M. Rumbaugh & Sally Boysen - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):539-554.
  25.  65
    The Neural Bases of Complex Tool Use in Humans.Scott H. Johnson-Frey - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):71-78.
  26.  6
    The Neural Basis of Human Tool Use.Guy A. Orban & Fausto Caruana - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  27.  11
    Tool Use and Affordance: Manipulation-Based Versus Reasoning-Based Approaches.François Osiurak & Arnaud Badets - forthcoming - Psychological Review.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  28.  18
    Tool-Use Changes Multimodal Spatial Interactions Between Vision and Touch in Normal Humans.Angelo Maravita, Charles Spence, Steffan Kennett & Jon Driver - 2002 - Cognition 83 (2):B25-B34.
  29.  1
    Grasping the Affordances, Understanding the Reasoning: Toward a Dialectical Theory of Human Tool Use.François Osiurak, Christophe Jarry & Didier Le Gall - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (2):517-540.
  30.  25
    Wittgenstein as a Philosopher of Technology: Tool Use, Forms of Life, Technique, and a Transcendental Argument.Mark Coeckelbergh & Michael Funk - 2018 - Human Studies 41 (2):165-191.
    The work of Ludwig Wittgenstein is seldom used by philosophers of technology, let alone in a systematic way, and in general there has been little discussion about the role of language in relation to technology. Conversely, Wittgenstein scholars have paid little attention to technology in the work of Wittgenstein. In this paper we read the Philosophical Investigations and On Certainty in order to explore the relation between language use and technology use, and take some significant steps towards constructing a framework (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31.  14
    Spontaneous Tool Use and Sensorimotor Intelligence in Cebus Compared with Other Monkeys and Apes.Suzanne Chevalier-Skolnikoff - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):561-588.
  32.  22
    Tool Use Ability Depends on Understanding of Functional Dynamics and Not Specific Joint Contribution Profiles.Ross Parry, Gilles Dietrich & Blandine Bril - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33.  12
    Visual Illusion of Tool Use Recalibrates Tactile Perception.Luke E. Miller, Matthew R. Longo & Ayse P. Saygin - 2017 - Cognition 162:32-40.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  9
    Sensorimotor Predictions and Tool Use: Hand-Held Tools Attenuate Self-Touch.Konstantina Kilteni & H. Henrik Ehrsson - 2017 - Cognition 165:1-9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  37
    Humour Production May Enhance Observational Learning of a New Tool-Use Action in 18-Month-Old Infants.Rana Esseily, Lauriane Rat-Fischer, Eszter Somogyi, Kevin John O'Regan & Jacqueline Fagard - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (4).
  36.  18
    What the Jeweller’s Hand Tells the Jeweller’s Brain: Tool Use, Creativity and Embodied Cognition.Chris Baber, Tony Chemero & Jamie Hall - 2019 - Philosophy and Technology 32 (2):283-302.
    The notion that human activity can be characterised in terms of dynamic systems is a well-established alternative to motor schema approaches. Key to a dynamic systems approach is the idea that a system seeks to achieve stable states in the face of perturbation. While such an approach can apply to physical activity, it can be challenging to accept that dynamic systems also describe cognitive activity. In this paper, we argue that creativity, which could be construed as a ‘cognitive’ activity par (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37.  2
    Cooperative Tool-Use Reveals Peripersonal and Interpersonal Spaces Are Dissociable.Ivan Patané, Alessandro Farnè & Francesca Frassinetti - 2017 - Cognition 166:13-22.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  19
    Action Goal Selection and Motor Planning Can Be Dissociated by Tool Use.Thérèse Collins, Tobias Schicke & Brigitte Röder - 2008 - Cognition 109 (3):363-371.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39.  12
    Acting and Understanding: Tool Use Revisited Through the Minds of Capuchin Monkeys.Elisabetta Visalberghi & Luca Limongelli - 1996 - In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 57--79.
  40.  18
    Tool-Use Practice Induces Changes in Intrinsic Functional Connectivity of Parietal Areas.Kwangsun Yoo, William S. Sohn & Yong Jeong - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  41.  10
    Tool Use in Birds: An Avian Monkey Wrench?Irene M. Pepperberg - 1989 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):604-605.
  42.  20
    Making the Best Use of Primate Tool Use?James R. Anderson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):551-552.
  43.  10
    A Comparative View of Object Combination and Tool Use: Moving Ahead.Dorothy Munkenbeck Fragaszy - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):557-557.
  44.  4
    Keas Rely on Social Information in a Tool Use Task but Abandon It in Favour of Overt Exploration.Gyula Koppany Gajdon, Laurent Amann & Ludwig Huber - 2011 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 12 (2):304-323.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  5
    Discovering and Learning Tool-Use for Fishing Honey by Captive Chimpanzees.D. Paquette - 1994 - Global Bioethics 7 (3):17-30.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  15
    Tool Use Changes the Spatial Extension of the Magnetic Touch Illusion.Arvid Guterstam, Joanna Szczotka, Hugo Zeberg & H. Henrik Ehrsson - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (2):298-303.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  1
    Tool-Use Training Induces Changes of the Body Schema in the Limb Without Using Tool.Yu Sun & Rixin Tang - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  48.  35
    Tool Use as Situated Cognition.Bryce Huebner & Andy Blitzer - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):245-62.
    Vaesen disregards a plausible alternative to his position, and so fails to offer a compelling argument for unique cognitive mechanisms. We suggest an ecological alternative, according to which divergent relationships between organism and environment, not exotic neuroanatomy, are responsible for unique cognitive capacities. This approach is pertinent to claims about primate cognition; and on this basis, we argue that Vaesen's inference from unique skills to unique mechanisms is unwarranted.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  8
    Response: Commentary: Effects of Dividing Attention on Memory for Declarative and Procedural Aspects of Tool Use.Shumita Roy & Norman W. Park - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  11
    How Our Cognition Shapes and Is Shaped by Technology: A Common Framework for Understanding Human Tool-Use Interactions in the Past, Present, and Future.François Osiurak, Jordan Navarro & Emanuelle Reynaud - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 999