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Torrance Kirby
McGill University
  1.  21
    ‘Divine Offspring’: Richard Hooker’s Neoplatonic Account of Law and Causality.Torrance Kirby - 2015 - Perichoresis 13 (1):5-17.
    ABSTRACT. Richard Hooker’s (1554-1600) adaptation of classical logos theology is exceptional and indeed quite original for its extended application of the principles of Neoplatonic apophatic theology to the concrete institutional issues of a particular time and place—the aftermath of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement of 1559. Indeed, his sustained effort to explore the underlying connections of urgent political and constitutional concerns with the highest discourse of hidden divine realities—the knitting together of Neoplatonic theology and Reformation politics—is perhaps the defining characteristic of (...)
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  2. A Companion to Richard Hooker.Torrance Kirby (ed.) - 2008 - Brill.
    Richard Hooker explained and defended the Elizabethan religious and political settlement, and shaped the self-understanding of the Church of England for generations. This Companion offers a comprehensive and systematic introduction to Hooker’s life, works, thought, reputation, and influence.
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  3. A Companion to Peter Martyr Vermigli.Torrance Kirby, Emidio Campi & Frank A. James Iii (eds.) - 2009 - Brill.
    Peter Martyr Vermigli's distinctive blend of humanism, hebraism, and scholasticism constitutes a unique contribution to the scriptural hermeneutics of the Reformation. The Companion consists of 24 essays addressing the reformer’s international career, exegetical method, biblical commentaries, major theological topics, and later influence.
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  4. Peter Martyr Vermigli's Political Theology and the Elizabethan Church.Torrance Kirby - 2010 - In The Reception of Continental Reformation in Britain. pp. 83.
    This chapter discusses the theological affinity between the Elizabethan church and Peter Martyr Vermigli, the Italian reformer who spent his later career in Zurich. Vermigli’s thought did not simply migrate from the continent to England. The discussion notes that Vermigli’s English experience as an exile was formative for the development of his political theology and that the English monarchy left an imprint on his subsequent Old Testament commentaries on the subject of kingship. Scottish Covenanters and English puritans in the early (...)
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