Results for 'Tou Lee Her'

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  1. Should Architects Refrain From Designing Prisons for Long-Term Solitary Confinement? – An Open Letter to the Architecture Profession.Tom Spector, Craig Borkenhagen, Mark Davis, Carrie Foster, Jacob Gann, Tou Lee Her, Aaron Klossner, Evan Murta, Ryan Rankin, Maria Cristina Rodriguez Santos, Connor Tascott, Sarah Turner & Spencer Williams - 2019 - Architecture Philosophy 4 (1).
    In a profile in the November, 2012 issue of the magazine Architect, activist-architect Raphael Sperry, a founder of the group Architects Planners & Designers for Social Responsibility (...)
     
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  2.  8
    As Lee Wilkins Argues in Her Article in This Collection, Journalism Seems to Come Into its Own During Natural Disasters. The Sheer Drama of Such Events Makes for Great Storytelling and Provides a National Showcase for the Talents of Local Reporters. This Was Illustrated Again in 2005 When the Great Flood Caused by Hurricane Katrina Overcame New Orleans and Chased Out the Staff of the Times-Picayune. At First, the Paper Was Unable to Issue a Print Edi-Tion and Instead Published on its Affiliated Nola ... [REVIEW]Sandra L. Borden - 2010 - In Christopher Meyers (ed.), Journalism Ethics: A Philosophical Approach. Oxford University Press. pp. 53.
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    Erasing Cerinthus: Sulpicia and Her Audience.Lee T. Pearcy - 2006 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (1):31-36.
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    Zoos: A Philosophical Tour.Keekok Lee - 2005 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this book, Keekok Lee asks the question, "what is an animal, and how does our treatment of it within captivity affect its status as a being (...)
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  5.  1
    Indexing Burdens and Benefits of Treatment to Age: Revisiting Paul RamseysMedical IndicationsPolicy.Matthew Lee Anderson - 2021 - Christian Bioethics 27 (2):183-202.
    This essay reconsiders Paul Ramseysmedical indicationspolicy and argues that his reconstruction of the case of Joseph Saikewicz demonstrates that there is more room for (...)caretakers to decline treatments forvoiceless dependentsthan his interlocutors have sometimes thought. It furthermore draws on Ramseys earlier work to propose ways that Ramsey might have improved his policy, and argues that the shortcomings of Ramseys view arise from his bracketing of age in making determinations about what form of medical care is owed. The reading of Ramsey set forth here suggests Cathleen Kavenys depiction of themedical indicationspolicy in Ethics at the Edges of Law is too rigid and inflexible, even while it affirms other aspects of her critique. (shrink)
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  6.  35
    Sympathy and Solidarity: And Other Essays.Sandra Lee Bartky - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In a rare full-length volume, renowned feminist thinker Sandra Lee Bartky brings together eight essays in one volume, Sympathy and Solidarity. A philosophical work accessible to (...)an educated general audience, the essays reflect the intersection of the author's eye, work, and sometimes her politics. Two motifs connect the works: first, all deal with feminist topics and themes; second, most deal with the reality of oppression, especially in the disguised and subtle ways it can be manifested. (shrink)
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  7.  78
    The Labors of Psyche: Toward a Theory of Female Heroism.Lee R. Edwards - 1979 - Critical Inquiry 6 (1):33-49.
    I have taken such pains to indicate the scope, terms, and foci of Neumann's analysis because he provides one of the main pillars on which any (...)further systematic study of the woman hero must rest. By showing Psyche's relation to the mythic or archetypal structure of heroism, by demonstrating the particular ways in which the hero is a figure distinguished primarily by involvement in particular patterns of action and psychological development, Neumann provides an invaluable service to further studies of literature, heroism, and women. Without belaboring the distinction between the hero and the heroine, Neumann validates the claim that a woman can be a hero and eliminates the awkward distinction between the heroine as heroic figure and the heroine as conventional woman that has perplexed so much recent literary, especially feminist, analysis.1 He is also very good at locating the details in Psyche's dilemma that constitute significant associative images within a narrative representing heroism by means of a female character. Specifically, he indicates how Psyche's beauty is as much a burden as a boon, shows the importance of her relationship to other female characters, and points out the ways in which the apparent hostility of other women acts as a necessary goad to Psyche's own developing independence. Neumann's analysis is also suggestive in showing the appropriateness of archetypal criticism to material which is not myth in the narrow sense. To be sure, Apuleius' Amor and Psyche results from the distillation of narratives whose origins are clearly to be found in the folklore and functioning mythologies of Greek and Roman culture; just as clearly, however, Apuleius is telling his tale as part of a highly self-conscious, complexly structured narrative2 analogous, in some ways, to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Milton's great religious epics, and even that seemingly least mythic set of narrative structures, the novel. · 1. See, e.g., Ellen Moers' long discussion of "heroinism" in Literary Women: The Great Writers , pp. 113-242. Moers' use of this awkward term, the female version of the presumably masculine heroism, perpetuates the idea that only men can be true heroes, while extraordinary women remain "special cases" necessitating special terminology2. See P. G. Walsh, The Roman Novel: The 'Satyricon' of Petronius and the 'Metamorphoses' of Apuleius , pp. 141-223. Lee R. Edwards is an editor of The Massachusetts Review and an associate professor of English at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She is presently completing The Labors of Psyche: Female Heroism and Fictional Form. (shrink)
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  8.  11
    Commentary On Nails.Lee Franklin - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):102-109.
    In this commentary on D. Nails, “Two Dogmas of Platonism,” I focus on her arguments for the claim that the Good is not the unhypothetical principle of (...)
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  9.  77
    The Epistemology of Absence-Based Inference.Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen & Jesper Kallestrup - 2013 - Synthese 190 (13):2573-2593.
    Our main aim in this paper is to contribute towards a better understanding of the epistemology of absence-based inferences. Many absence-based inferences are classified as fallacies (...). There are exceptions, however. We investigate what features make absence-based inferences epistemically good or reliable. In Section 2 we present Sanford Goldbergs account of the reliability of absence-based inference, introducing the central notion of epistemic coverage. In Section 3 we approach the idea of epistemic coverage through a comparison of alethic and evidential principles. The Equivalence Schemaa well-known alethic principlesays that it is true that $p$ if and only if $p$ . We take epistemic coverage to underwrite a suitably qualified evidential analogue of the Equivalence Schema: for a high proportion of values of $p$ , subject $S$ has evidence that $p$ due to her reliance on source $S^{*}$ if and only if $p$ . We show how this evidential version of the Equivalence Schema suffices for the reliability of certain absence-based inferences. Section 4 is dedicated to exploring consequences of the Evidential Equivalence Schema. The sloganabsence of evidence is evidence of absencehas received a lot of bad press. More elaborately, what has received a lot of bad press is something like the following idea: absence of evidence sufficiently good to justify belief in $p$ is evidence sufficiently good to justify belief in $\sim p$ . A striking consequence of the Evidential Equivalence Schema is that absence of evidence sufficiently good to justify belief in p is evidence sufficiently good to justify belief in $\sim p$ . We establish this claim in Section 4 and show how this supports the reliability of an additional type of absence-based inference. Section 4 immediately raises the following question: how can we make philosophically good sense of the idea that absence of evidence is evidence of absence? We address this question in Section 5. Section 6 contains some summary remarks. (shrink)
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  10.  79
    A Phenomenology of Seeing and Affect in a Polarized Climate.Emily S. Lee - 2019 - In Race as Phenomena: Between Phenomenology and Philosophy of Race. London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 107-124.
    A Phenomenology of Seeing and Affect in a Polarized Climate,” focuses on the polarized political climate that reflects racial and class differences in the wake of the (...)
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  11.  13
    Affective Memory in Vernon Lee (Violet Paget) (1856-1935).Marina Trakas - 2019 - Encyclopedia of Concise Concepts by Women Philosophers.
    The notion of affective memory was first introduced by Théodule Ribot (1894), giving rise to a debate about its existence at the beginning of the 20th century. (...)
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  12. Laurus Nobilis Chapters on Art and Life.Vernon Lee - 1909 - John Lane, the Bodley Head John Lane Co.
    Vernon Lee was the pseudonym of the British writer Violet Paget (1856-1935). She is known mostly for her supernatural fiction. She also wrote essays and poetry. (...)She contributed to The Yellow Book and was a follower of Walter Pater. Her literary works explored the themes of haunting and possession. She was responsible for introducing the concept of empathy into the English language. Empathy was a key concept in Lee's psychological aesthetics which she developed on the basis of prior work by Theodor Lipps. Her response to aesthetics interpreted art as a mental and corporeal experience. This was a significant contribution to the philosophy of art which has been largely neglected. Additionally she wrote, along with her friend and colleague Henry James, critically about the relationship between the writer and his/her audience pioneering the concept of criticism and expanding the idea of critical assessment among all the arts as relating to an audience's (or her personal) response. She was a strong proponent of the Aesthetic movement. Among her famous works are: A Phantom Lover (1890), Hauntings (1890) and Art and Life (1896). (shrink)
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  13.  9
    Making the Invisible Visible’: an Audience Response to an Art Installation Representing the Complexity of Congenital Heart Disease and Heart Transplantation.Giovanni Biglino, Sofie Layton, Matthew Lee, Froso Sophocleous, Susannah Hall & Jo Wray - 2019 - Medical Humanities 45 (4):399-405.
    The arts can aid the exploration of individual and collective illness narratives, with empowering effects on both patients and caregivers. The artist, partly acting as conduit, can (...)
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  14.  17
    Intimacy and Family Consent: A Confucian Ideal.Shui Chuen Lee - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (4):418-436.
    In the West, mainstream bioethicists tend to appreciate intimate relationships as a hindrance to individual autonomy. Scholars have even argued against approaching a mother to donate a (...)
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  15.  45
    Authority in Sport.Victor Lee Austin - 2012 - Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (1):65-72.
    Herbert McCabe uses football (soccer) as an analogy for Christian ethics, the sports game being an illuminating abstraction from the concreteness of moral life. This paper explores (...)
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  16.  15
    Arguing Against the Expressive Function of Punishment: Is the Standard Account That Insufficient?Ambrose Lee - 2019 - Law and Philosophy 38 (4):359-385.
    This paper critically appraises the arguments that have been offered for what can be calledthe expressive function of punishment’. According to this view, what distinguishes punishment (...)
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  17. Mala Prohibita and Proportionality.Youngjae Lee - forthcoming - Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-22.
    What is the proportionate punishment for conduct that is neither harmful nor wrongful? A likely response to that is that one ought not to be punished at (...)
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  18.  76
    Christ and Business Culture: A Study of Christian Executives in Hong Kong[REVIEW]Kam-hon Lee, Dennis P. McCann & MaryAnn Ching - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):103-110.
    Does Christian faith matter in business? If so, how does it affect the way executives handle managerial issues, especially the ones that are ethically controversial? This paper (...)
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  19.  7
    Comments on Sandra Lee Bartky's Femininity and Domination.Carol A. Mickett - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):173-177.
    To illustrate the strength of Bartky's clarity of insight I focus on her discussion of shame found in two essays in Femininity and Domination. I argue (...)that these essays as well as the other in the collection identify and offer a clear analysis of many issues central to feminism and call for Bartky to write a sequel which offers constructive suggestions of ways out. (shrink)
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  20. The Ambiguous Practices of the Inauthentic Asian American Woman.Emily S. Lee - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (1):146-163.
    The Asian American identity is intimately associated with upward class mobility as the model minority, yet women's earnings remain less than men's, and Asian American women (...) are perceived to have strong family ties binding them to domestic responsibilities. As such, the exact class status of Asian American women is unclear. The immediate association of this ethnic identity with a specific class as demonstrated by the recently released Pew study that Asian Americans arethe highest-income, best-educatedethnicity contrasts with another study that finds Asian American women have the highest suicide rates in the United States. To understand these contrasting statistics, this article explores Asian American women's sense of authenticity. If the individual's sense of authenticity is intimately related with one's group identity, the association of the Asian American identity with a particular class ambivalently ensnares her as dichotomously inauthenticas both the poor Asian American woman who fails to achieve economic upward mobility and the model minority Asian American woman who engages in assimilation practices. Feminist philosophers understand that identities change, but exactly how these transformations occur remains a mystery. The article ends with three speculations on the difficulties for practicing and recognizing individual acts that transform one's group identity. (shrink)
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  21.  58
    The Lex of the Earth? Arendts Critique of Roman Law.Shinkyu Lee - forthcoming - Journal of International Political Theory:175508821989823.
    How political communities should be constituted is at the center of Hannah Arendts engagement with two ancient sources of law: the Greek nomos and the Roman (...)lex. Recent scholarship suggests that Arendt treats nomos as imperative and exclusive while lex has a relationship-establishing dimension and that for an inclusive form of polity, she favors lex over nomos. This article argues, however, that Arendts appreciation occurs within a general context of more reservations about Rome than Roman-centric interpretations admit. Her writings show that lex could not accommodate the agonistic spirit and Homeric impartiality that helped the Greeks achieve human greatness and surpassing excellence. Arendt also points out that Roman peace alliances occurred at the expense of disclosive competition among equals and assumed some form of domination. Indeed, although Arendt appreciates lexs relationship-establishing aspect, she is undoubtedly critical of anti-political practices accompanying lex, manifested when the Romans required enemiessubmission to terms of peace the Romans themselves set. In the end, Arendts statements regarding nomos and lex highlight the fundamental challenge in free politics: balancing the internal demand of agonistic action with the external need to expand lasting ties. (shrink)
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  22. The Real Promise of Federalism: A Case Study of Arendts International Thought.Shinkyu Lee - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory:147488512090605.
    For Hannah Arendt, the federal system is an effective mode of organizing different sources of power while avoiding sovereign politics. This article aims to contribute two specific (...)
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  23.  23
    Ginsborg on a Kantian-Brandomian View of Concepts.Byeong D. Lee - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 28 (1):56-74.
    ABSTRACTAccording to a Kantian-Brandomian view of concepts, we can understand concepts in terms of norms or rules that bind those who apply them, and the use (...)of a concept requires that the concept-user be sensitive to the relevant conceptual norms. Recently, Ginsborg raises two important objections against this view. According to her, the normativity Brandom ascribes to concepts lacks the internalist or first-person character of normativity that Kants view demands, and the relevant normativity belongs properly not to concepts as such, but rather to belief or assertion. The purpose of this paper is to defend a Kantian-Brandomian view of concepts against these objections. (shrink)
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  24. The Crisis of Judgment in Kant's Three Critiques: In Search of a Science of Aesthetics[REVIEW]Lee Kerckhove - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (4):917-917.
    The Crisis of Judgment in Kant's Three Critiques is intended as an analysis and reconstruction of the role of the faculty of judgment as it evolves (...)through the course of Kant's critical philosophy. It offers an analysis of the mental power of judgment and systematically develops its links to feeling, cognition, and the will. In the introductory chapter, Scherer spells out the two guiding questions of her study: How does judgment relate systematically to understanding, reason, and the will? Is judgment constitutive or regulative? Scherer's study emphasizes the architectonic and antinomic nature of reason in Kant, thereby stressing the necessarily resolutive function of judgment. (shrink)
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  25.  15
    Decisions of Identity: Feminist Subjects and Grammars of Sexuality.Wendy Lee-Lampshire - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (4):32 - 45.
    While Sarah Hoagland's conception of a lesbian ethic offers a promising route toward articulating an ethics of resistance, her notion of self in community does not (...)provide a conception of "subject" capable of both embracing political action as fundamental to personal life and explicitly recognizing cultural, ethnic, and sexual multiplicity as central to ethical decision-making. Such a notion can be found, however, in the remarks of later Wittgenstein concerning the "language games" of describing. (shrink)
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  26.  37
    Body Ownership and Experiential Ownership in the Self-Touching Illusion.Caleb Liang, Si-Yan Chang, Wen-Yeo Chen, Hsu-Chia Huang & Yen-Tung Lee - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5 (1591):1-13.
    We investigate two issues about the subjective experience of one's body: first, is the experience of owning a full-body fundamentally different from the experience of owning (...) a body-part?Second, when I experience a bodily sensation, does it guarantee that I cannot be wrong about whether it is me who feels it? To address these issues, we conducted a series of experiments that combined the rubber hand illusion (RHI) and thebody swap illusion.” The subject wore a head mounted display (HMD) connected with a stereo camera set on the experimenter's head. Sitting face to face, they used their right hand holding a paintbrush to brush each other's left hand. Through the HMD, the subject adopted the experimenter's first-person perspective (1PP) as if it was his/her own 1PP: the subject watched either the experimenter's hand from the adopted 1PP, and/or the subject's own hand from the adopted third-person perspective (3PP) in the opposite direction (180°), or the subject's full body from the adopted 3PP (180°, with or without face). The synchronous full-body conditions generate aself-touching illusion”: many participants felt thatI was brushing my own hand!” We found that (1) the sense of body-part ownership and the sense of full-body ownership are not fundamentally different from each other; and (2) our data present a strong case against the mainstream philosophical view called the immunity principle (IEM). We argue that it is possible for misrepresentation to occur in the subject's sense ofexperiential ownership” (the sense that I am the one who is having this bodily experience). We discuss these findings and conclude that not only the sense of body ownership but also the sense of experiential ownership call for further interdisciplinary studies. (shrink)
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  27.  12
    Republics and Their Loves: Rereading City of God 191.Gregory W. Lee - 2011 - Modern Theology 27 (4):553-581.
    In City of God 19.24, Augustine rejects Cicero's definition of res publica as a society founded on justice for a new definition focused on common objects (...) of love. Robert Markus, Oliver O'Donovan, and a host of Augustinian political theologians have depicted this move as a positive gesture toward secular society. Yet this reading fails to account for why Augustine waited so long to address Cicero's definition, first discussed in Book 2, and for the radical dualism Augustine sets forth between the two cities throughout his text. I argue, in line with Rowan Williams and John Milbank, for a minority reading of Book 19 that draws upon the narrative structure of City of God. In Books 35, Augustine recounts the history of the earthly city according to Rome's penchant for violence and idolatry, both a function of love for temporal goods. In Book 18, Augustine traces the history of the earthly city before Rome according to the same themes, completing a narrative argument that humanity has always been divided according to differing loves. Book 19 advances the idea that such idolatry is injusticea failure to grant God the worship he is due. With the new definition of 19.24, Augustine retains Cicero's emphasis on the importance of virtue in civic society while characteristically shifting the terms of discussion from justice to love. While such a definition means that Rome can be called a res publica, it also prompts a negative judgment upon her history according to her objects of love. Given her violence and idolatry, Rome is no better than Assyria, Babylon, Egypt, and Greeceall subject to withering critique in Book 18. Thus, Augustine's new definition does not retract but extends the polemic of City of God. (shrink)
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  28.  27
    In a Secular Spirit: Strategies of Clinical Pastoral Education.Simon J. Craddock Lee - 2002 - Health Care Analysis 10 (4):339-356.
    The Clinical Pastoral Education model forthe provision of spiritual care represents theemergence of a secularized professionalpractice from a religiously-based theologicalpractice of chaplaincy. The transformation ofhospital chaplaincy (...)intospiritual careservicesis one means by which religioushealthcare ministry negotiates modernity, inthe particular forms of the secular realm ofbiomedicine and the pluralism of thecontemporary United States healthcaremarketplace. “Spiritualis a labelstrategically deployed to extend the realm ofrelevance to any patient'sbelief system,”regardless of his or her religious affiliation.“Theologicallanguage is recast as a tool forconceptualizing thespiritual lens.” Suchmoves transform chaplaincy from a peripheralservice, applicable only to the fewreligiouspatients, into an integral element of patientcare for all. Such a secularized professionalpractice is necessary to demonstrate therelevance and utility of spiritual care for allhospital patients in an era of cost-containmentpriorities and managed care economics. (shrink)
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  29. In Our Shoes or the Protagonists? Knowledge, Justification, and Projection.Chad Gonnerman, Lee Poag, Logan Redden, Jacob Robbins & Stephen Crowley - 2020 - In Tania Lombrozo, Shaun Nichols & Joshua Knobe (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy, Vol. 3. Oxford University Press. pp. 189-212.
    Sackris and Beebe (2014) report the results of a series of studies that seem to show that there are cases in which many people are willing to (...)
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  30.  39
    Leaving Platos Cave.Patrick Lee Miller - 2016 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 2:94-116.
    In Republic, Plato presents a pedagogy whose crucial component is the conversion of the students soul. This is clearest in the Allegory of the Cave, where (...)the prisoner begins her liberation by turning herself away from the images on the wall. Conversion is not something we professors typically seek to provoke in a philosophy course, even when we teach Plato. But if this were our goal, what could we do to achieve it within the limits of the modern university? I present one such effort, a paper that uses the Allegory to focus on two questions: who are you, and how did you become that way? After presenting both the prompt and its rationale, I summarize six student submissions and discuss how I evaluated them. I conclude by considering the risks and possibilities of addressing the whole soul and not simply the intellect. (shrink)
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  31.  27
    Comments on Sandra Lee Bartky's Femininity and Domination.Carol A. Mickett - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):173 - 177.
    To illustrate the strength of Bartky's clarity of insight I focus on her discussion of shame found in two essays in Femininity and Domination. I argue (...)that these essays as well as the other in the collection identify and offer a clear analysis of many issues central to feminism and call for Bartky to write a sequel which offers constructive suggestions of ways out. (shrink)
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  32.  15
    Body-as-Subject in the Four-Hand Illusion.Caleb Liang, Yen-Tung Lee, Wen-Yeo Chen & Hsu-Chia Huang - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9 (1710):1-9.
    In a recent study (Chen et al., 2018), we conducted a series of experiments that induced thefour-hand illusion”: using a head-mounted display (HMD), the participant (...) adopted the experimenters first-person perspective (1PP) as if it was his/her own 1PP. The participant saw four hands via the HMD: the experimenters two hands from the adopted 1PP and the subjects own two hands from the adopted third-person perspective (3PP). In the active four-hand condition, the participant tapped his/her index fingers, imitated by the experimenter. Once all four hands acted synchronously and received synchronous tactile stimulations at the same time, many participants felt as if they owned two more hands. In this paper, we argue that there is a philosophical implication of this novel illusion. According to Merleau-Ponty (1945/1962) and Legrand (2010), one can experience ones own body or body-part either as-object or as-subject but cannot experience it as both simultaneously, i.e., these two experiences are mutually exclusive. Call this view the Experiential Exclusion Thesis. We contend that a key component of the four-hand illusionthe subjective experience of the 1PP-hands that involved bothkinesthetic sense of movementandvisual sense of movement” (the movement that the participant sees via the HMD)—provides an important counter-example against this thesis. We argue that it is possible for a healthy subject to experience the same body-part both as-subject and as-object simultaneously. Our goal is not to annihilate the distinction between body-as-object and body-as-subject, but to show that it is not as rigid as suggested by the phenomenologists. (shrink)
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    Pragmatist Feminism as Philosophic Activism: The {R}Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs.Danielle Lake - 2020 - The Pluralist 15 (1):25-45.
    How Do We Reimagine?We reimagine by combining activism with philosophy.... We have to see every crisis as both a danger and an opportunity. It's a danger (...) because it does so much damage to our lives, to our institutions, to all that we have expected. But it's also an opportunity for us to become creative; to become the new kind of people that are needed at such a huge period of transition.—Boggs, "How Do We Reimagine?"this essay seeks to add to the emerging dialogue about the incredibly rich and complex nature of Grace Lee Boggs's philosophic activism by exploring the connections and tensions between her philosophic activism and pragmatist feminism. As an Asian American immigrant with a PhD in philosophy, her... (shrink)
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  34.  60
    The Global Economy and Kathie Lee: Public Relations and Media.Sally M. Alvarez - 2000 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (2):77-88.
    In a congressional hearing in the spring of 1996, talk show host Kathie Lee Gifford was charged with endorsing clothing made in Honduran sweatshops by exploited children. (...)
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  35. Madness and Judiciousness: A Phenomenological Reading of a Black Womans Encounter with a Saleschild.Emily S. Lee - 2010 - In Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.), Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy. SUNY Press.
    Patricia Williams in her book, The Alchemy of Race and Rights, describes being denied entrance in the middle of the afternoon by asaleschild.” Utilizing the works (...)
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  36. Belief and Settledness.Wooram Lee - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    This paper elucidates the sense in which belief is a question-settling attitude. In her recent work, Jane Friedman suggests that we understand the settledness of belief (...)in terms of a normative principle about belief and inquiry: one ought not inquire into a question and believe the answer to the question at the same time. On the basis of the distinction between dispositional and occurrent belief, I argue against Friedman that there is no principle linking belief and inquiry that is both plausible and normative: on the dispositional reading ofbelief’, such a principle is implausible; on the occurrent reading ofbelief’, such a principle is not normative. I argue instead that the settledness should be understood as a descriptive relation between occurrent belief and inquiry: one cannot inquire into whether p while at the same time occurrently believing that p. (shrink)
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  37.  61
    Characterizing Aesthetic Experience.Haewan Lee - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 1:161-167.
    In this paper, I suggest what I think is an appropriate characterization of aesthetic experience. I do this by critically assessing Noel Carrolls position and Gary (...)Isemingers counterposition. Carroll claims that aesthetic experience should be understood only as an experience of the aesthetic content of an object. Although I accept many of Carrolls points, I find his position unconvincing. I contend that, in addition to the content, positive value plays a significant role as a constituent of aesthetic experience. Unlike Carroll, Iseminger formulates a value centered view of aesthetic experience. However, I find Isemingers position even moreproblematic. Since having an aesthetic experience is such a general phenomenon, and does not seem to require an introspective response, neither a subjects meta-belief, nor judgment concerning the value of her own experience, should be required. Also, I believe that intrinsic value is not necessary for aesthetic experience, because the value aesthetic experience has could be instrumental. I suggest that we can better characterize the aesthetic experience as anexperience of aesthetic contents combined with positive value. I reject the additional meta-belief requirement. (shrink)
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  38.  94
    Cosmopolitanism with Room for Nationalism.Win-Chiat Lee - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):279-293.
    Gillian Brock attempts to reconcile cosmopolitanism with nationalism in Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account . She claims that her cosmopolitanism leaves room for legitimate nationalism. I argue that (...) her cosmopolitanism is not only a theory of global justice, but also a general theory of justice, according to which what justice may demand of us is fundamentally global in nature. As such, Brock's cosmopolitanism cannot accommodate nationalism in the overall structure of what justice may demand of us, but has to relegate it to the discretionary space left open after what justice may demand of us globally has been met. This does not amount to much of a reconciliation or a particularly moderate cosmopolitanism, contrary to Brock's claim. More important, I argue, Brock's cosmopolitan theory of justice need not follow from the more fundamental view of moral cosmopolitanism. (shrink)
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  39. Does Plantinga's Evolutionary Argument Against Naturalism Work?Wang-yen Lee - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (1):73.
    In Alvin Plantinga's evolutionary argument against naturalism (EAAN), he contends that someone who holds both naturalism (N) and evolution (E) acquires an undefeated defeater for her (...)belief that 'human cognitive faculties are reliable' (R) and as a result an undefeated defeater for everything else she believes when she comes to realize that P(R/N&E) is low or inscrutable. I argue for two theses in this paper. First, when a naturalist-evolutionist comes to think that P(R/N&E) is inscrutable, that does not constitute an undefeated defeater for her belief that R if her original grounds for believing R are something other than an assessment of P(R/N&E). Second, even if she acquires an undefeated defeater for her belief that R when she comes to think that P(R/N&E) is inscrutable, it does not follow that she has a defeater for all her other beliefs. The main contribution lies in my response to Plantinga's attempt to resist my second thesis. (shrink)
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  40.  30
    Hannah Arendt and the Limits of Political Freedom. Does Politics Have Meaning at All?Jin-Woo Lee - 2006 - Synthesis Philosophica 21 (2):327-338.
    The author sets forth from the claim that the name of Hannah Arendt is tied to the radical and original revival of the question of political freedom, (...)
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  41.  28
    Inducing Breach of Contract, Conversion and Contract as Property.Pey-Woan Lee - 2009 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (3):511-533.
    This article seeks to understand contractual rights through an examination of the possiblepropertycontent in contracts in the context of the inducement tort and conversion. It (...)
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  42.  3
    I Come From A Place: Reflections on Katie Cannons Womanist Classroom.Charlene Jin Lee - 2020 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 74 (1):31-37.
    This essay honors the teaching legacy of Katie Geneva Cannon. The renowned social ethicist, theologian, and womanist scholar was foremost a beloved teacher. Her former student reflects (...)
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  43. Throw Like YSP.Kyoo Lee - 2019 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 9 (2):89-118.
    This essay introduces the work of thefirst generationKorean feminist photographer Youngsook Park. Highlighting the spirited and criticalwildnessof her feminist aesthetic agenda, with a (...)
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  44.  23
    The Way of Poetic Influence: Revisioning the "Syncretist Chapters" of the Zhuangzi.Jung H. Lee - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (4):pp. 552-571.
    This essay examines the intra-poetic relationship between the "Inner Chapters" and the "Syncretist Chapters" of the Zhuangzi , exploring the affinities and tensions between the two competing (...)
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  45. Emily Dickinson and Philosophy.Jed Deppman, Marianne Noble & Gary Lee Stonum (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Emily Dickinson's poetry is deeply philosophical. Recognizing that conventional language limited her thought and writing, Dickinson created new poetic forms to pursue the moral and intellectual (...)issues that mattered most to her. This collection situates Dickinson within the rapidly evolving intellectual culture of her time and explores the degree to which her groundbreaking poetry anticipated trends in twentieth-century thought. Essays aim to clarify the ideas at stake in Dickinson's poems by reading them in the context of one or more relevant philosophers, including near-contemporaries such as Nietzsche, Kierkegaard and Hegel, and later philosophers whose methods are implied in her poetry, including Levinas, Sartre and Heidegger. The Dickinson who emerges is a curious, open-minded interpreter of how human beings make sense of the world - one for whom poetry is a component of a lifelong philosophical project. (shrink)
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  46.  4
    One Door Closes, a Next Door Opens Up Somewhere’: The Learning of One Olympic Synchronised Swimmer.Natalie Barker-Ruchti, Dean Barker, Steven Rynne & Jessica Lee - 2012 - .
    Although training in sport is necessary to reach Olympic status, a conditioned body is not the only outcome. Athletes also learn how to be Olympians. This learning (...)
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  47.  1
    Body Ownership and the Four-Hand Illusion.Wen-Yeo Chen, Hsu-Chia Huang, Yen-Tung Lee & Caleb Liang - 2018 - Scientific Reports 8 (2153):1-17.
    Recent studies of the rubber hand illusion (RHI) have shown that the sense of body ownership is constrained by several factors and yet is still very flexible. (...)
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  48.  9
    Heidegger and the Source of Meaning.Charlotte Knowles - 2013 - South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):327-338.
    Sandra Lee Bartky criticises the account of meaning contained in Heideggers ontology in Being and Time. In her view, Heidegger must choose between the claim that (...)meaning is received and the claim that it is created, but is unable to do so. This paper argues that Bartkys criticism is misconceived, by showing that meaning, as Heidegger understands it, is necessarily both created and received. According to a number of influential commentators, the ultimate source of meaning is das ManHeideggers con ception of the social world. This paper initially considers, but ultimately rejects, the view that the source of meaning, as Heidegger presents it, is social. Instead, this paper argues that meaning is rooted in what Heidegger callsletting be’. Letting be articulates a distinctive relationship between the human being and entities. This relationship, it is argued, accommodates the notion of meaning as both received and created, by reconstituting these terms within a context that defines the human being as an interpreting entity, therefore showing that letting be should be understood as the ultimate source of meaning in Heideggers ontology. (shrink)
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  49. A Value-Oriented Framework for Precision Medicine.Francesca Bosisio & Gaia Barazzetti - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (4):88-90.
    In her article, Lee vouches for a reciprocity-based approach that supports an ethics of inclusion in precision medicine research and accounts for participantsvalues and experiences (...)of the... (shrink)
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  50. Explaining the "Magic" of Consciousness.Daniel C. Dennett - 2003 - Journal of Cultural and Evolutionary Psychology 1 (1):7-19.
    Is the view supported that consciousness is a mysterious phenomenon and cannot succumb, even with much effort, to the standard methods of cognitive science? The lecture, using (...)
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