Results for 'Tragic, The'

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  1.  45
    An Essay on the Tragic.Peter Szondi - 2002 - Stanford University Press.
    Peter Szondi´s pathbreaking work is a succinct and elegant argument for distinguishing between a philosophy of the tragic and the poetics of tragedy espoused by Aristotle. The first of the book´s two parts consists of a series of commentaries on philosophical and aesthetic texts from twelve thinkers and poets between 1795 and 1915: Schelling, Hölderlin, Hegel, Solger, Goethe, Schopenhauer, Vischer, Kierkegaard, Hebbel, Nietzsche, Simmel, and Scheler. The various definitions of tragedy are read not so much in terms of their specific (...)
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  2.  57
    The Tragic Sense of Life in Men and Nations.Miguel de Unamuno - 1972 - Princeton University Press.
    The acknowledged masterpiece of Unamuno expresses the anguish of modern man as he is caught up in the struggle between the dictates of reason and the demands of his own heart.
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  3.  20
    Tragic Thoughts at the End of Philosophy: Language, Literature, and Ethical Theory.Gerald L. Bruns - 1999 - Northwestern University Press.
    Recently, a number of Anglo-American philosophers of very different sorts--pragmatists, metaphysicians, philosophers of language, philosophers of law, moral philosophers--have taken a reflective rather than merely recreational interest in literature. Does this literary turn mean that philosophy is coming to an end or merely down to earth? In this collection of essays, one of the most insightful of contemporary literary theorists investigates the intersection of literature and philosophy, analyzing the emerging preferences for practice over theory, particulars over universals, events over structures, (...)
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  4. The Tragic Vision and the Christian Faith.Nathan A. Scott - 1957 - New York: Association Press.
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  5.  45
    Tragic Dilemmas and the Priority of the Moral.Todd Bernard Weber - 2000 - The Journal of Ethics 4 (3):191-209.
    My purpose in this paper is to argue that we are not vulnerableto inescapable wrongdoing occasioned by tragic dilemmas. I directmy argument to those who are most inclined to accept tragicdilemmas: those of broadly Nietzschean inclination who reject``modern moral philosophy'''' in favor of the ethical ideas of theclassical Greeks. Two important features of their project are todeny the usefulness of the ``moral/nonmoral distinction,'''' and todeny that what are usually classified as moral reasons always oreven characteristically ``trump'''' nonmoral reasons in anadmirable (...)
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  6.  93
    Tragic-Remorse–the Anguish of Dirty Hands.Stephen De Wijze - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (5):453-471.
    This paper outlines and defends a notion of tragic-remorse. This moral emotion properly accompanies those actions that involve unavoidable moral wrongdoing in general and dirty hands scenarios in particular. Tragic-remorse differs both phenomenologically and conceptually from regret, agent-regret and remorse. By recognising the existence of tragic-remorse, we are better able to account for our complex moral reality which at times makes it necessary for good persons to act in ways that although justified leave the agent with a moral stain and (...)
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  7.  5
    The Tragic, the Impossible and Democracy: An Interview with Jacques Derrida. [REVIEW]Danie Goosen - 2010 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 23 (3):243-264.
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  8.  13
    On Thinking the Tragic with Adorno.Markku Nivalainen - 2016 - The European Legacy 21 (7):644-663.
    This article seeks to provide a template for understanding the tragic dimension of Theodor W. Adorno’s philosophy through a reading of his early collaborative work with Max Horkheimer, the Dialectic of Enlightenment. While Adorno’s view has often been considered to be tragic, little has been done to reconstruct the tragic dimension of his thought. I argue that the view of the human condition, presented in the Dialectic of Enlightenment, is founded on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical convictions that have structural similarities (...)
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  9.  20
    A Tragic Desire: Rousseau and the Modern Democratic Project.Alice Ormiston - 2011 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2011 (154):8-28.
    ExcerptThe desire for a better future, for a justice that can be realized in the world, is intrinsic to the modern democratic project. At the same time, this desire has been fraught with disappointment and, in some cases, bound up with frightening atrocities and rigid ideological impositions. Hence the desire itself is paradoxical—indeed, as I shall argue, tragic. This article is an attempt to explore the nature of this tragic desire. It does so through an examination of Rousseau, whose writings (...)
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  10. The Poet in the Poem: A Phenomenological Analysis of Anne Sexton's: Briar Rose (Sleeping Beauty) in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.Ca Miller - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:61-73.
     
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  11.  19
    The Tragic Theory of Carl Schmitt.Andrea Salvatore - 2012 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2012 (161):181-187.
    The Winter 2010 issue of Telos has clearly highlighted the relevance of Carl Schmitt's Hamlet or Hecuba to both the interpretation of Schmitt's political theory and Shakespearean criticism. The main thesis concerning Schmitt's intrusion into the literary field deals with the structural relationships between historical context and tragic dimension, between politics and aesthetics; the tragic drama can be properly understood only in relation to the historical context to which it refers and the concrete situation that it aims to re-present. The (...)
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  12. Tragedy and the Completion of Freedom in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.A. -T. Tymieniecka - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:295-306.
     
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  13. Hardy's Jude: The Pursuit of the Ideal as Tragedy in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.S. Abdoo - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:307-318.
     
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  14. Fallings From Us, Vanishings...: Composition and the Structure of Loss in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre. [REVIEW]M. Alexander - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:91-97.
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  15. Why Be a Poet? In The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.M. -T. Bertelloni - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:37-45.
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  16. The French Nouveau Roman: The Ultimate Expression of Impressionism in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.Victor Carrabino - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:261-270.
     
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  17. What Can the Poem Do Today? The Self-Evaluation of Western Poets After 1945 in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.C. Eykman - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:141-156.
     
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  18. From Helikon to Aetna: The Precinct of Poetry in Hesiod, Empedokles, Holderlin, and Arnold in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.Lm Findlay - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:119-140.
     
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  19. The Act of Writing as an Apprehension of the Enigma of Being-in-the-World in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.J. Garelli - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:451-477.
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  20. The Structure of Allegory in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.Jesse Gellrich - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:505-519.
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  21. Toward a Theory of Contemporary Tragedy in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.E. Kaelin - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:341-361.
     
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  22. The Re-Emergence of Tragedy in Late Medieval England: Sir Thomas Malory's Morte Darthur in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.B. Kennedy - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:363-378.
     
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  23. Literary Impressionism and Phenomenology: Affinities and Contrasts in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.M. Kronegger - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:521-533.
     
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  24. The Birth of Tragedy Out of the Spirit of Music: Claudel, Milhaud and the Oresteia in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.M. Kronegger - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:273-293.
     
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  25. Tragic Closure and the Cornelian Wager in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.J. Lyons - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:409-415.
     
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  26. Fiction and the Transposition of Presence in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.F. Martinez-Bonati - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:495-504.
     
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  27. The Problem of Reading, Phenomenologically or Otherwise in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.J. Margolis - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:559-568.
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  28. The Existential Sources of Rhetoric: A Comparison Between Traditional Epic and Modern Narrative in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.A. Medina - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:227-240.
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  29. Un Modèle d'Analyse du Texte Dramatique in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.A. Moussally - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:547-557.
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  30. Du Désordre À L'Ordre: Le Rôle de la Violence Dans Horace in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.Bl Murphy - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:435-447.
     
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  31. The Field of Poetic Constitution in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.L. Oppenheim - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:47-59.
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  32. Tragical, Comical, Historical in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.M. Platt - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:379-400.
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  33. The Denial of Tragedy: The Self-Reflexive Process of the Creative Activity and the French New Novel in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.F. Ravaux - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:401-406.
     
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  34. Nature, Feeling, and Disclosure in the Poetry of Wallace Stevens in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.J. Ruppert - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:75-88.
     
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  35. A Long Day's Journey Into Night: The Historicity of Human Existence Unfolding in Virginia Woolf's Fiction in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.Ba Schlack - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:209-224.
     
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  36. Myth and Tragic Action in La Celestina and Romeo and Juliet in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.M. Stewart - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:425-433.
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  37. Phenomenology and Literary Impressionism: The Prismatic Sensibility in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.P. Stowell - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:535-544.
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  38. Aesthetic Enjoyment and Poetic Sense. Poetic Sense: The Irreducible in Literature in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre. [REVIEW]A. -T. Tymieniecka - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:3-21.
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  39. The Theme: The Poetic, Epic and Tragic Genres as the Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.A. -T. Tymieniecka - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18.
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  40. Intuition in Britannicus in The Existential Coordinates of the Human Condition: Poetic, Epic, Tragic. The Literary Genre.B. Woshinsky - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 18:417-423.
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  41.  46
    Moral Responsibility, Technology, and Experiences of the Tragic: From Kierkegaard to Offshore Engineering.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):35-48.
    The standard response to engineering disasters like the Deepwater Horizon case is to ascribe full moral responsibility to individuals and to collectives treated as individuals. However, this approach is inappropriate since concrete action and experience in engineering contexts seldom meets the criteria of our traditional moral theories. Technological action is often distributed rather than individual or collective, we lack full control of the technology and its consequences, and we lack knowledge and are uncertain about these consequences. In this paper, I (...)
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  42. Friedrich Schiller on Republican Virtue and the Tragic Exemplar.J. Church - 2014 - European Journal of Political Theory 13 (1):95-118.
    Scholars have recently argued that Friedrich Schiller makes a signal contribution to republican political theory in his view of “aesthetic education,” which offers a means of elevating self-interest to virtue. However, though this education is lauded in theory, it has been denigrated as implausible, irresponsible, or dangerous in practice. This paper argues that the criticisms rest on a faulty assumption that artistic objects constitute the sole substance of this “aesthetic education.” Through a reading of Schiller’s work throughout the 1790s, I (...)
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  43.  5
    Critique of the "Tragic Case" Method in Ethics Education.J. Liaschenko, N. Y. Oguz & D. Brunnquell - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (11):672-677.
    It is time for the noon conference. Your job is to impart a career-changing experience in ethics to a group of students and interns gathered from four different schools with varying curriculums in ethics. They have just finished 1½ h of didactic sessions and lunch. One third of them were on call last night. Your first job is to keep them awake. The authors argue that this “tragic case” approach to ethics education is of limited value because it limits understanding (...)
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  44.  20
    Tragic-Remorse — the Anguish of Dirty Hands.Stephen De Wijze - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 7 (5):453 - 471.
    This paper outlines and defends a notion of 'tragic-remorse'. This moral emotion properly accompanies those actions that involve unavoidable moral wrongdoing in general and dirty hands scenarios in particular. Tragic-remorse differs both phenomenologically and conceptually from regret, agent-regret and remorse. By recognising the existence of tragic-remorse, we are better able to account for our complex moral reality which at times makes it necessary for good persons to act in ways that although justified leave the agent with a moral stain and (...)
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  45.  26
    The South as Tragic Landscape.Louis A. Ruprecht - 2006 - Thesis Eleven 85 (1):37-63.
    Much has been made of the ‘Southern difference’ in cultural and sociological images of the North American landscape. Everything isdifferent there: the cuisine, the music, the religion, and the politics. Moreover, the South was the crucible in which two of the definitive North American experiences were formed: the Civil War (1861–5) and the Civil Rights Movement a century later. This article poses another important category, in addition to ‘race and space’ – namely, the concept of tragedy, and the correlative rendering (...)
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  46. The Poetry and the Pity: Hume's Account of Tragic Pleasure.Elisa Galgut - 2001 - British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (4):411-424.
    I defend Hume's account of tragic pleasure against various objections. I examine his account of the emotions in order to clarify his "conversion theory". I also argue that Hume does not give us a theory of tragedy as an aesthetic genre, but rather elucidates the felt experience of a particular work of tragedy. I offer a partial reading of King Lear by way of illustration. Finally, I suggest that the experiences of aesthetic pleasure, and aesthetic sadness, share certain qualities. "Tragic (...)
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  47.  88
    Arendt and Hegel on the Tragic Nature of Action.Allen Speight - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (5):523-536.
    Among the sources of Hannah Arendt's philosophy of action is an unexplored one: the account of agency in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. Drawing on a consideration of what has been called the 'dramaturgical' character of Arendt's philosophy of action, the article compares the accounts of action in Arendt's Human Condition and in the 'Spirit' chapter of the Phenomenology. Both works share a similar overall structure: in each case, the account of action begins with the opening-up of previously unseen or unexpected (...)
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  48.  4
    Nietzsche, Tension, and the Tragic Disposition by Matthew Tones.Flucher Elisabeth - 2017 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 48 (2):300-303.
    In Nietzsche, Tension, and the Tragic Disposition, Matthew Tones undertakes an ambitious journey through Nietzsche’s writings, dealing with, among other things, Nietzsche’s notion of tragedy, his relation to ancient Greek thought, his naturalism, and the concept of nobility developed in GM and BGE. Tones thus gives a detailed and insightful reconstruction of Nietzsche’s philosophy. But this strength of the book is unfortunately also its limit. Tones highlights the complexities of the problems he discusses, but one gets the impression that he (...)
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  49.  24
    Melancholy and Nausea: From Destiny as the Basis of Tragic Character to Existential Absurdity.Thiago Rodrigues - 2014 - Trans/Form/Ação 37 (2):185-196.
    A partir da perspectiva intelectualista grega, na qual o dualismo entre corpo e alma requer o primado do discurso racional [lógos] em detrimento do páthos filosófico, busca-se com este artigo associar a noção de "desmedida" [hybris] com a noção de melancolia. Essa associação ganha ainda mais relevo, quando a aproximamos da interpretação de Simone Weil para o poema épico de Homero, a Ilíada. Se essa aproximação se justifica, então é patente a aproximação entre o caráter trágico que o destino adquire, (...)
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  50.  67
    The Hidden God: A Study of Tragic Vision in the Pensées of Pascal and the Tragedies of Racine.Lucien Goldmann - 1964 - Routledge.
    The concept of ‘world visions’, first elaborated in the early work of Georg Lukàcs, is used here as a tool whereby the similarities between Pascal’s Pensées and Kant’s critical philosophy are contrasted with the rationalism of Descartes and the empiricism of Hume. For Lucien Goldmann, a leading exponent of the most fruitful method of applying Marxist ideas to literary and philosophical problems, the ‘tragic vision’ marked an important phase in the development of European thought from rationalism and empiricism to the (...)
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