Results for 'Transcendental Freedom'

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  1.  11
    Transcendental Freedom and its Discontents.Joe Saunders - 2018 - Con-Textos Kantianos 8:319-322.
    This introduction briefly lays out the basics of Kant’s concept, transcendental freedom, and some of its discontents. It also provides an overview of the dossier itself, introducing Katerina Deligiorgi’s discussion of ought-implies-can, Patrick Frierson’s account of degrees of responsibility, and Jeanine Grenberg’s treatment of the third-person.
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  2. Kant on Transcendental Freedom.Derk Pereboom - 2006 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (3):537-567.
    Transcendental freedom consists in the power of agents to produce actions without being causally determined by antecedent conditions, nor by their natures, in exercising this power. Kant contends that we cannot establish whether we are actually or even possibly free in this sense. He claims only that our conception of being transcendentally free involves no inconsistency, but that as a result the belief that we have this freedom meets a pertinent standard of minimal credibility. For the rest, (...)
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  3. On the Transcendental Freedom of the Intellect.Colin McLear - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):35-104.
    Kant holds that the applicability of the moral ‘ought’ depends on a kind of agent-causal freedom that is incompatible with the deterministic structure of phenomenal nature. I argue that Kant understands this determinism to threaten not just morality but the very possibility of our status as rational beings. Rational beings exemplify “cognitive control” in all of their actions, including not just rational willing and the formation of doxastic attitudes, but also more basic cognitive acts such as judging, conceptualizing, and (...)
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  4.  17
    Practical and Transcendental Freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason.Francisco Iracheta Fernández - 2012 - Ideas Y Valores 61 (150):91-125.
    Se problematiza la conexión entre la libertad práctica y trascendental en la Crítica de la razón pura. La intención es explicitar las dificultades que enfrenta Kant al relacionar estos sentidos de libertad dentro del marco de la filosofía crítica. Por lo general, los intérpretes entienden la relación entre estos dos sentidos de libertad como ontológica o como conceptual. Se quiere mostrar que ninguna de estas interpretaciones alcanza a superar los presuntos dogmatismos racionalista y empirista que, en conformidad con Kant, sustentan (...)
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  5.  72
    Transcendental and Practical Freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason.Markus Kohl - 2014 - Kant-Studien 105 (3).
    To many readers, it has seemed that Kant's discussion of the relation between practical and transcendental freedom in the Transcendental Dialectic is inconsistent with his discussion of the same relation in the Canon of Pure Reason. In this paper I argue for a novel way of preserving the consistency of Kant's view: in both the Dialectic and the Canon, 'transcendental freedom' requires the absence of determination by all natural causes, whereas 'practical freedom' requires the (...)
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  6.  8
    Why Does Transcendental Freedom Seem Absurd? Note to a Proof for the Antithesis of the 3rd Antinomy.Jens Timmermann - 2000 - Kant-Studien 91 (1):8-16.
  7.  71
    Practical and Transcendental Freedom in the Critique of Pure Reason.Henry E. Allison - 1982 - Kant-Studien 73 (3):271.
  8. An Examination of Kant's Treatment of Transcendental Freedom.Dennis P. Quinn - 1988 - Upa.
    This book presents a view of the concepts in the Kantian scheme of things. The author attempts to show that Kant has not established the necessity of thinking human freedom in the theoretical sphere as would seem to be demanded by the inner logic of the first Critique and by the concept of autonomy in the second Critique.
     
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  9.  53
    Ought Implies Can, Asymmetrical Freedom, and the Practical Irrelevance of Transcendental Freedom.Matthé Scholten - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):1-18.
    In this paper, I demonstrate that Kant's commitment to an asymmetry between the control conditions for praise and blame is explained by his endorsement of the principle Ought Implies Can (OIC). I argue that Kant accepts only a relatively weak version of OIC and that he is hence committed only to a relatively weak requirement of alternate possibilities for moral blame. This suggests that whether we are transcendentally free is irrelevant to questions about moral permissibility and moral blameworthiness.
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  10. Surely God is No Illusion (Kant)-Observations on Krings, Hermann Transcendental Freedom.R. Malter - 1983 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 90 (2):345-363.
     
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  11.  41
    The Metaphysics of Human Freedom: From Kant’s Transcendental Idealism to Schelling’s Freiheitsschrift.Sebastian Gardner - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (1):133-156.
    Schelling’s 1809 Freiheitsschrift, perhaps his most widely read work, presents considerable difficulties of understanding. In this paper, I offer an interpretation of the work in relation to Kant. My focus is on the relation in each case of their theory of human freedom to their general metaphysics, a relation which both regard as essential. The argument of the paper is in sum that Schelling may be viewed as addressing and resolving a problem which faces Kant’s theory of freedom (...)
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  12.  80
    Free Will and Epistemology: A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom.Robert Lockie - 2018 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This is a work concerned with justification and freedom and the relationship between these. Its summational aim is to defend a transcendental argument for free will – that we could not be epistemically justified in undermining a strong notion of free will, as a strong notion of free will would be required for any such process of undermining to be itself epistemically justified. The book advances two transcendental arguments – for a deontically internalist conception of epistemic justification (...)
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  13.  18
    Kant's Transcendental Idealism, Freedom and the Divine Mind1.Christopher J. Insole - 2011 - Modern Theology 27 (4):608-638.
    Without denying the importance of a range of independent epistemic and metaphysical considerations, I argue that there is an irreducibly theological dimension to the emergence of Kant's transcendental idealism. Creative tasks carried out by the divine mind in the pre‐critical works become assigned to the human noumenal mind, which is conceived of as the source of space, time and causation. Kant makes this shift in order to protect the possibility of transcendental freedom. I show that Kant has (...)
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  14. Kant and the Problem of Recognition: Freedom, Transcendental Idealism, and the Third-Person.Joe Saunders - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (2):164-182.
    Kant wants to show that freedom is possible in the face of natural necessity. Transcendental idealism is his solution, which locates freedom outside of nature. I accept that this makes freedom possible, but object that it precludes the recognition of other rational agents. In making this case, I trace some of the history of Kant’s thoughts on freedom. In several of his earlier works, he argues that we are aware of our own activity. He later (...)
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  15.  23
    The Nature of a Transcendental Argument: Toward a Critique of Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom.Jamie Morgan - 2004 - Journal of Critical Realism 3 (2):305-340.
    Surprisingly, over the decade or so since its publication, Bhaskar's Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom has received relatively little in the way of systematic analysis either by critical realists or their critics. There have been, however, a number of critiques that have dealt with some of its themes and developments in a variety of contexts. In the following study, I assess the argument of Alex Callinicos. Callinicos' critique, though in many ways sympathetic, is fundamental to critical realism. Engaging with (...)
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  16.  33
    Taking Transcendental Idealism Seriously: Rethinking the Freedom and Determinism Debate.John Ian K. Boongaling - 2013 - Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 17 (1):102-123.
  17.  48
    Freedom and Transcendental Idealism.Gary Banham - 2006 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (4):787 – 797.
    Full-text of this article is not available in this e-prints service. This article was originally published following peer-review in British Journal for the History of Philosophy, published by and copyright Routledge.
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  18.  8
    Freedom and Necessity of the Development of Mind From the Viewpoint of Kant's Transcendental Philosophy.Young-Jun Ko - 2013 - The Journal of Moral Education 25 (3):133.
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  19.  80
    Freedom Immediately After Kant.Owen Ware - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (4):865-881.
    Kant’s effort to defend the co-existence of transcendental freedom and natural necessity is one of the crowning achievements of the first Critique. Yet by identifying the will with practical reason in his moral philosophy, he lent support to the view that the moral law is the causal law of a free will – the result of which, as Reinhold argued, left immoral action impossible. However, Reinhold’s attempt to separate the will from practical reason generated difficulties of its own, (...)
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  20. Freedom and Art-on the Concept of a Transcendental Aesthetics.A. Pieper - 1989 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 96 (2):241-253.
  21.  1
    Freedom, Liberty, and Laws of State-Transcendental Approach.Ag Pleydellpearce - 1975 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 6 (3):173-185.
  22.  53
    Ontological-Transcendental Defence of Metanormative Realism.Michael Kowalik - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (2):573-586.
    If there is something (P) that every possible agent is committed to value, and certain actions or attitudes either enhance or diminish P, then normative claims about a range of intentional actions can be objectively and non-trivially evaluated. I argue that the degree of existence as an agent depends on the consistency of reflexive-relating with other individuals of the agent-kind: the ontological thesis. I then show that in intending to act on a reason, every agent is rationally committed to value (...)
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  23. Freedom and Constraint by Norms.Robert Brandom - 1979 - American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (3):187 - 196.
    In this paper I will examine one way of developing Kant's suggestion that one is free just insofar as he acts according to the dictates of norms or principles. and of his distinction between the Realm of Nature, governed by causes, and the Realm of Freedom, governed by norms and principles. Kant's transcendental machinery—the distinction between Understanding and Reason, the free noumenal self expressed somehow as a causally constrained phenomenal self, and so on—can no longer secure this distinction (...)
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  24. Moral Education and Transcendental Idealism.Joe Saunders & Martin Sticker - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (4):646-673.
    In this paper, we draw attention to several important tensions between Kant’s account of moral education and his commitment to transcendental idealism. Our main claim is that, in locating freedom outside of space and time, transcendental idealism makes it difficult for Kant to both provide an explanation of how moral education occurs, but also to confirm that his own account actually works. Having laid out these problems, we then offer a response on Kant’s behalf. We argue that, (...)
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  25. Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom.Roy Bhaskar - 2008 - Routledge.
    Introduction: Critical realism, hegelian dialectic and the problems of philosophy preliminary considerations -- Objectives of the book -- Dialectic : an initial orientation -- Negation -- Four degrees of critical realism -- Prima facie objections to critical realism -- On the sources and general character of the hegelian dialectic -- On the immanent critique and limitations of the hegelian dialectic -- The fine structure of the hegelian dialectic -- Dialectic : the logic of absence, arguments, themes, perspectives, configurations -- Absence (...)
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  26. I Am Link's Transcendental Will : Freedom From Hyrule to Earth.Dario S. Compagno - 2009 - In Luke Cuddy (ed.), The Legend of Zelda and Philosophy: I Link Thereforei Am. Open Court.
  27. Abraham, Nicolas. Rhythms: On the Work, Translation, and Psychoanalysis. Translated by Benjamin Thigpen and Nicholas T. Rand. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1995. Xii & 169 Pp. Cloth $35.00; Paper $12.95. Adams, EM Religion and Cultural Freedom. Philadelphia: Temple Univer-Sity Press, 1993. Xiii & 193 Pp. Cloth $39.95. [REVIEW]Transcendental Semiotics - 1996 - Man and World 29:445-468.
     
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  28.  14
    The Principle of Freedom. A Discussion of the Prospects and Limitations of Transcendental Philosophy.Hans Köchler - 1981 - Philosophy and History 14 (1):4-6.
  29.  53
    Strawson’s Modest Transcendental Argument.D. Justin Coates - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (4):799-822.
    Although Peter Strawson’s ‘Freedom and Resentment’ was published over fifty years ago and has been widely discussed, its main argument is still notoriously difficult to pin down. The most common – but in my view, mistaken – interpretation of Strawson’s argument takes him to be providing a ‘relentlessly’ naturalistic framework for our responsibility practices. To rectify this mistake, I offer an alternative interpretation of Strawson’s argument. As I see it, rather than offering a relentlessly naturalistic framework for moral responsibility, (...)
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  30. An Asymmetrical Approach to Kant's Theory of Freedom.Benjamin Vilhauer - forthcoming - In Dai Heide and Evan Tiffany (ed.), The Idea of Freedom: New Essays on the Interpretation and Significance of Kant's Theory of Freedom.
    Asymmetry theories about free will and moral responsibility are a recent development in the long history of the free will debate. To my knowledge, Kant commentators have not yet explored the possibility of an asymmetrical reconstruction of Kant's theory of freedom, and that will be my goal here. By "free will", I mean the sort of control we would need to be morally responsible for our actions. Kant's term for it is "transcendental freedom", and he refers to (...)
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  31.  49
    Freedom and Anthropology in Kant’s Moral Philosophy.Patrick R. Frierson - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive account of Kant's theory of freedom and his moral anthropology. The point of departure is the apparent conflict between three claims to which Kant is committed: that human beings are transcendentally free, that moral anthropology studies the empirical influences on human beings, and that more anthropology is morally relevant. Frierson shows why this conflict is only apparent. He draws on Kant's transcendental idealism and his theory of the will and describes how empirical influences (...)
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  32. Freedom and the Distinction Between Phenomena and Noumena: Is Allison’s View Methodological, Metaphysical, or Equivocal?Kenneth Westphal - 2001 - Journal of Philosophical Research 26:593-622.
    Henry Allison [1983; cf. 1990, 1996] criticizes and rejects naturalism because the idea of freedom is constitutive of rational spontaneity, which alone enables and entitles us to judge or to act rationally, and only transcendental idealism can justify our acting under the idea of freedom. Allison’s critique of naturalism is unclear because his reasons for claiming that free rational spontaneity requires transcendental idealism are inadequate and because his characterization of Kant’s idealism is ambiguous. Recognizing this reinforces (...)
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  33. Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant’s Theoretical and Practical Philosophy.Henry E. Allison - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant, and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. Special features of the collection are: a detailed defence of the author's (...)
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  34. Recognition, Freedom, and the Self in Fichte's Foundations of Natural Right.Michael Nance - 2015 - European Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):608-632.
    In this paper I present an interpretation of J. G. Fichte's transcendental argument for the necessity of mutual recognition in Foundations of Natural Right. Fichte's argument purports to show that, as a condition of the possibility of self-consciousness, we must take ourselves to stand in relations of mutual recognition with other agents like ourselves. After reconstructing the steps of Fichte's argument, I present what I call the ‘modal dilemma’, which highlights a serious ambiguity in Fichte's deduction. According to the (...)
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  35.  15
    Determinism and Judgment. A Critique of the Indirect Epistemic Transcendental Argument for Freedom.Luca Zanetti - 2019 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 15 (2):33-54.
    In a recent book entitled Free Will and Epistemology. A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom, Robert Lockie argues that the belief in determinism is self-defeating. Lockie’s argument hinges on the contention that we are bound to assess whether our beliefs are justified by relying on an internalist deontological conception of justification. However, the determinist denies the existence of the free will that is required in order to form justified beliefs according to such deontological conception of justification. (...)
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  36. To Be Able to, or to Be Able Not To? That is the Question. A Problem for the Transcendental Argument for Freedom.Nadine Elzein & Tuomas K. Pernu - 2019 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 15 (2):13-32.
    A type of transcendental argument for libertarian free will maintains that if acting freely requires the availability of alternative possibilities, and determinism holds, then one is not justified in asserting that there is no free will. More precisely: if an agent A is to be justified in asserting a proposition P (e.g. "there is no free will"), then A must also be able to assert not-P. Thus, if A is unable to assert not-P, due to determinism, then A is (...)
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  37. Acerca da solução crítica do problema da possibilidade da ideia transcendental de liberdade em Kan: Série 2 / On Kant’s critical solution for the possibility problem of the transcendental idea of freedom.Alexandre Hahn - 2010 - Kant E-Prints 5:93-108.
    The present paper aims to discuss Kant’s critical solution for the possibility problem of the transcendental idea of freedom. The problem consists in the supposed incompatibility between that idea and the natural causality. Despite the impossibility of a dogmatic solution for the conflict, the philosopher proposes a critical solution. This critical solution frequently is interpreted as a attempt to make freedom compatible with natural causation. There are, however, some divergences about the form and the implications of that (...)
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  38. Kant's Conception of Freedom: A Developmental and Critical Analysis.Henry E. Allison - 2020 - Cambridge University Press.
    Although a good deal has been written about Kant's conception of free will in recent years, there has been no serious attempt to examine in detail the development of his views on the topic. This book endeavours to remedy the situation by tracing Kant's thoughts on free will from his earliest discussions of it in the 1750s through to his last accounts in the 1790s. This developmental approach is of interest for at least two reasons. First, it shows that the (...)
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  39.  21
    Toward a Characterization of I. Kant's Transcendental Idealism: The Metaphysics of Freedom.T. I. Oizerman - 1999 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 38 (3):7-22.
    The antithesis of nature and freedom is the central idea of Kant's philosophy. It is the direct expression of its postulated division of all existing things into the world of phenomena, which in their sum-total constitute nature, and its original foundation—the world of things in themselves, which lie beyond the categorial determinations of nature. Necessity and causal relations, like space and time, apply only to the world of phenomena; the world of things in themselves is free of these determinations (...)
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  40.  9
    Freedom, Equality and Fraternity in Kant’s Critique of Judgement.Agnes Heller - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (3):187-197.
    ABSTRACTAt least during his critical period, all of Kant’s philosophical works have a secret political dimension. Among other things, following the analysis of Hannah Arendt, the Critique of Judgment – paragraph 40 in particular – became a main text of political philosophy. In looking at the Critique of Judgement from a political perspective, I shall refer not to paragraph 40 but to the Kantian discussion of pure aesthetic judgement. In my opinion, one can understand Kant’s remarks on aesthetic judgement, and (...)
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  41.  27
    'Free Will and Epistemology: A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom', by Robert Lockie.Joe Campbell - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (3):633-633.
    Volume 97, Issue 3, September 2019, Page 633-633.
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  42.  96
    Naturalistic and Transcendental Moments in Kant's Moral Philosophy.Paul Guyer - 2007 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 50 (5):444 – 464.
    During the 1760s and 1770s, Kant entertained a naturalistic approach to ethics based on the supposed psychological fact of a human love for freedom. During the critical period, especially in the Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant clearly rejected such an approach. But his attempt at a metaphysical foundation for ethics in section III of the Groundwork was equally clearly a failure. Kant recognized this in his appeal to the "fact of reason" argument in the Critique of Practical (...)
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  43. Exorcising the Spectre of Illusions: The Deduction of Freedom in the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals and Kant’s Doctrine of Transcendental Idealism.James Dorahy - 2015 - Praxis 4 (1).
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  44.  16
    The Nature of a Transcendental Argument.Jamie Morgan - 2004 - Journal of Critical Realism 3 (2):305-40.
    Surprisingly, over the decade or so since its publication, Bhaskar's Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom has received relatively little in the way of systematic analysis either by critical realists or their critics. There have been, however, a number of critiques that have dealt with some of its themes and developments in a variety of contexts. In the following study, I assess the argument of Alex Callinicos. Callinicos' critique, though in many ways sympathetic, is fundamental to critical realism. Engaging with (...)
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  45.  29
    Robert Lockie: Free Will and Epistemology. A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom: London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018. Hardback , €103.30. 303+Xiii Pp.László Bernáth - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (3):743-745.
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  46.  64
    Recent Books on Kant: Kant's Theory of Imagination; Kant and the Experience of Freedom; Aesthetic Judgement and the Moral Image of the World; Dignity and Practical Reason; Immanuel Kant; Kant's Compatibilism; Kant's Transcendental Psychology; The Unity of Reason; Kant's Theory of Justice. [REVIEW]Graham Bird, Sarah Gibbons, Paul Guyer, Dieter Henrich, Thomas E. Hill, Otfried Höffe, Marshall Farrier, Hud Hudson, Patricia Kitcher, Susan Neiman, Allen D. Rosen & John H. Zammito - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (183):226.
  47.  43
    The Transcendental Fall In Kant and Schelling.Robert F. Brown - 1984 - Idealistic Studies 14 (1):49-66.
    I have argued elsewhere that the traditional Augustinian account of the fall is conceptually defective. It offers causal explanations for the first instance of willing evil which violate affirmations of divine goodness and justice integral to Christian thought. Augustine is the most influential spokesperson for the conviction that the first human pair initiated fallenness on the earth by decisions and actions they took within time though indeed very near to time’s beginning. A supporting account, embellished imaginatively by the tradition, enlarges (...)
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  48.  12
    Robert Lockie: Free Will and Epistemology. A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom.Ingvar Johansson - 2019 - Metaphysica 20 (1):137-143.
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  49.  17
    Robert Lockie, Free Will and Epistemology: A Defence of the Transcendental Argument for Freedom, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 320 Pp., £91 , ISBN 9781350029040. [REVIEW]Luca Zanetti - 2019 - Dialectica 73 (1-2):273-279.
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  50.  84
    Fichte: From Nature to Freedom.Allen W. Wood - unknown
    Allen W.Wood Stanford University Fichte’s overall aim in the Second Chapter of the System of Ethics is to derive the applicability of the moral principle he has deduced in the First Chapter. That principle was: To determine one’s freedom solely in accordance with the concept of selfdetermination.1 To show that this principle can be applied is to derive its application from the conditions of free agency in which we find ourselves. In the section of the Second Chapter that will (...)
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