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Trevor Bibler [6]Trevor M. Bibler [5]
  1.  23
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Responding to Those Who Hope for a Miracle: Practices for Clinical Bioethicists”.Trevor M. Bibler, Myrick C. Shinall & Devan Stahl - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (5):W1-W5.
    Significant challenges arise for clinical care teams when a patient or surrogate decision-maker hopes a miracle will occur. This article answers the question, “How should clinical bioethicists respond when a medical decision-maker uses the hope for a miracle to orient her medical decisions?” We argue the ethicist must first understand the complexity of the miracle-invocation. To this end, we provide a taxonomy of miracle-invocations that assist the ethicist in analyzing the invocator's conceptions of God, community, and self. After the ethicist (...)
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  2.  13
    We Don’T Need Unilateral DNRs: Taking Informed Non-Dissent One Step Further.Diego Real de Asúa, Katarina Lee, Peter Koch, Inmaculada de Melo-Martín & Trevor Bibler - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (5):314-317.
    Although shared decision-making is a standard in medical care, unilateral decisions through process-based conflict resolution policies have been defended in certain cases. In patients who do not stand to receive proportional clinical benefits, the harms involved in interventions such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation seem to run contrary to the principle of non-maleficence, and provision of such interventions may cause clinicians significant moral distress. However, because the application of these policies involves taking choices out of the domain of shared decision-making, they face (...)
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  3.  7
    Remaining Ambiguities Surrounding Theological Negotiation and Spiritual Care: Reply to Greenblum and Hubbard.Trevor Bibler - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (11):711-712.
    Readers have much to consider when evaluating Greenblum and Hubbard’s conclusion that ‘physicians have no business doing theology’.1 The two central arguments the authors offer are fairly convincing within the confines they set for themselves, the provisos they stipulate and their notions of ‘privacy’ and ‘public reason’. However, I would ask readers to consider two questions, the answers to which I believe the authors leave opaque. First, what is theological negotiation? Second, what makes chaplains the singular group of healthcare professionals (...)
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  4.  6
    Not There Yet: Evaluating Clinical Ethics Consultation in an Accountability Culture.Courtenay R. Bruce & Trevor M. Bibler - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (3):46-48.
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  5.  13
    A Risky Recommendation.Trevor Bibler & Courtenay R. Bruce - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (1):70-72.
  6.  4
    Between Crisis and Convention: How Should We Address Contingency?Trevor Bibler - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (5):17-19.
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  7.  5
    Consultations Across Languages.Trevor Bibler, Adam Peña & Courtenay R. Bruce - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (3):13-14.
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  8.  7
    Do We Have to Replace the Balloon Pump When It Fails?Trevor M. Bibler, Jamie M. Crist, Janet Malek & Andrew M. Childress - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (1):10-13.
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  9.  20
    A Qualitative Exploration of a Clinical Ethicist’s Role and Contributions During Family Meetings.Courtenay R. Bruce, Trevor M. Bibler, Adam M. Pena & Betsy Kusin - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (4):283-299.
    Despite the interpersonal nature of family meetings and the frequency in which they occur, the clinical ethics literature is devoid of any rich descriptions of what clinical ethicists should actually be doing during family meetings. Here, we propose a framework for describing and understanding “transitioning” facilitation skills based on a retrospective review of our internal documentation of 100 consecutive cases wherein a clinical ethicist facilitated at least one family meeting. The internal documents were analyzed using qualitative methodologies, i.e., “codes”, to (...)
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  10.  9
    Ethical Challenges in Advance Care Planning During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Anveet S. Janwadkar & Trevor M. Bibler - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):202-204.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 202-204.
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  11.  6
    I Am Not Interested in Talking with You.Adam Peña & Trevor Bibler - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (4):7-9.
    Mr. M is an eighty-five-year-old who presented to the hospital with congestive heart failure exacerbation, pneumonia, altered mental status, and sepsis. A physician determines that he lacks capacity, and the team in the intensive care unit looks to the patient's daughter, Celia, as his surrogate decision-maker because she is named as an agent in his medical power of attorney form. While in the ICU, Mr. M suffers acute respiratory distress secondary to pneumonia and thus requires intubation. Celia accepts several life-sustaining (...)
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