10 found
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  1.  46
    A Factor-Based Definition of Precedential Constraint.John F. Horty & Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 2012 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 20 (2):181-214.
    This paper describes one way in which a precise reason model of precedent could be developed, based on the general idea that courts are constrained to reach a decision that is consistent with the assessment of the balance of reasons made in relevant earlier decisions. The account provided here has the additional advantage of showing how this reason model can be reconciled with the traditional idea that precedential constraint involves rules, as long as these rules are taken to be defeasible. (...)
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  2.  63
    A Comparison of Four Ontologies for the Design of Legal Knowledge Systems.Pepijn R. S. Visser & Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 1998 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 6 (1):27-57.
    There is a growing interest in how people conceptualise the legal domain for the purpose of legal knowledge systems. In this paper we discuss four such conceptualisations (referred to as ontologies): McCarty's language for legal discourse, Stamper's norma formalism, Valente's functional ontology of law, and the ontology of Van Kralingen and Visser. We present criteria for a comparison of the ontologies and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the ontologies in relation to these criteria. Moreover, we critically review the criteria.
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  3.  25
    Try to See It My Way: Modelling Persuasion in Legal Discourse. [REVIEW]Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 2003 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 11 (4):271-287.
    In this paper I argue that to explain and resolve some kinds of disagreement we need to go beyond what logic alone can provide. In particular, following Perelman, I argue that we need to consider how arguments are ascribed different strengths by different audiences, according to how accepting these arguments promotes values favoured by the audience to which they are addressed. I show how we can extend the standard framework for modelling argumentation systems to allow different audiences to be represented. (...)
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  4.  9
    Transition Systems for Designing and Reasoning About Norms.Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 2015 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 23 (4):345-366.
    The design and analysis of norms is a somewhat neglected topic in AI and Law, but this is not so in other areas of Computer Science. In recent years powerful techniques to model and analyse norms have been developed in the Multi-Agent Systems community, driven both by the practical need to regulate electronic institutions and open agent systems, and by a theoretical interest in mechanism design and normative systems. Agent based techniques often rely heavily on enforcing norms using the software (...)
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  5.  9
    Establishing Norms with Metanorms in Distributed Computational Systems.Samhar Mahmoud, Nathan Griffiths, Jeroen Keppens, Adel Taweel, Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon & Michael Luck - 2015 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 23 (4):367-407.
    Norms provide a valuable mechanism for establishing coherent cooperative behaviour in decentralised systems in which there is no central authority. One of the most influential formulations of norm emergence was proposed by Axelrod :1095–1111, 1986). This paper provides an empirical analysis of aspects of Axelrod’s approach, by exploring some of the key assumptions made in previous evaluations of the model. We explore the dynamics of norm emergence and the occurrence of norm collapse when applying the model over extended durations. It (...)
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  6.  48
    Argumentation in AI and Law: Editors' Introduction. [REVIEW]Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon & Paul E. Dunne - 2005 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 13 (1):1-8.
  7.  27
    George C. Christie, the Notion of an Ideal Audience in Legal Argument.Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 2001 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 9 (1):59-71.
  8. Audiences in Argumentation Frameworks.Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon, Sylvie Doutre & Paul E. Dunne - 2007 - Artificial Intelligence 171 (1):42-71.
  9. Zenon Bankowski, Ian White, and Ulrike Hahn, Informatics and the Foundations of Legal Reasoning.Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 1999 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 7 (4):363-365.
     
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  10. The Maximum Length of Prime Implicates for Instances of 3-SAT.Paul E. Dunne & Trevor J. M. Bench-Capon - 1997 - Artificial Intelligence 92 (1-2):317-329.
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