Results for 'Triple bottom line policy'

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  1. W(H)Ither Ecology? The Triple Bottom Line, the Global Reporting Initiative, and Corporate Sustainability Reporting.Markus J. Milne & Rob Gray - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):13-29.
    This paper offers a critique of sustainability reporting and, in particular, a critique of the modern disconnect between the practice of sustainability reporting and what we consider to be the urgent issue of our era: sustaining the life-supporting ecological systems on which humanity and other species depend. Tracing the history of such reporting developments, we identify and isolate the concept of the ‘triple bottom line’ (TBL) as a core and dominant idea that continues to pervade business reporting, (...)
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  2.  45
    The Three Fundamental Criticisms of the Triple Bottom Line Approach: An Empirical Study to Link Sustainability Reports in Companies Based in the Asia-Pacific Region and TBL Shortcomings. [REVIEW]Kaushik Sridhar & Grant Jones - 2013 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 2 (1):91 - 111.
    Abstract There is increasing evidence suggesting that environmental and social criteria are impacting the market in complex ways. The corporate world has demonstrated a willingness to respond to public pressure for improved performance on non–economic issues by embracing Triple Bottom Line (TBL) principles. TBL reporting has been institutionalized as a way of thinking for corporate sustainability. However, institutions are constantly changing and improving, while TBL has been fairly conservative in its approach to change. The more balanced focus (...)
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  3.  23
    Is the Triple Bottom Line a Restrictive Framework for Non-Financial Reporting?Kaushik Sridhar - 2012 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 1 (2):89 - 121.
    Abstract The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyse the developmental stages of non-financial reporting in corporations, by interpreting the views of interviewees from major ethical corporations on the six major dimensions of non-financial reporting (identified in the literature) within each stage of the five-stage model of non-financial reporting (developed in this paper). This study is part of a series of papers on Triple Bottom Line reporting (TBL), and its relevance to corporate reporting practices. The TBL (...)
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    Big Pharma: A Former Insider’s View. [REVIEW]David Badcott - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):249-264.
    There is no lack of criticisms frequently levelled against the international pharmaceutical industry (Big Pharma): excessive profits, dubious or even dishonest practices, exploiting the sick and selective use of research data. Neither is there a shortage of examples used to support such opinions. A recent book by Brody (Hooked: Ethics, the Medical Profession and the Pharmaceutical Industry, 2008) provides a précis of the main areas of criticism, adopting a twofold strategy: (1) An assumption that the special nature and human need (...)
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  5.  11
    Exploring the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Guidelines as a Model for Triple Bottom-Line Reporting.L. P. Hartman & M. Painter-Morland - 2007 - African Journal of Business Ethics 2 (1):45.
    The paper is aimed at analyzing the contribution that the Global Reporting Initiative makes to the field of sustainability reporting. It provides an overview of the multitude of initiatives aimed at standardizing corporate social responsibility efforts on a global scale and highlights the ways in which the GRI can be distinguished from other international initiatives. By evaluating GRI's goals and its claims, the paper provides an overview of the strengths and weaknesses of this critical initiative. It includes a discussion of (...)
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  6.  1
    Sustainable Innovativeness and the Triple Bottom Line: The Role of Organizational Time Perspective.Annachiara Longoni & Raffaella Cagliano - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 151 (4):1097-1120.
    This paper studies the influence of an organization’s time perspective on triple bottom line deployment through sustainable innovativeness. Although academics increasingly consider sustainable innovation to be an essential element in deploying the triple bottom line, the degree of an organization’s sustainable innovativeness remains limited. Using ten inductive case studies based on the triangulation of data from multiple-respondent interviews and secondary data, this study shows that an organization’s time perspective plays a crucial role in explaining (...)
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  7. A Response to “Getting to the Bottom of 'Triple Bottom Line'”.Moses L. Pava - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):105-110.
    Wayne Norman and Chris MacDonald launch a strong attack against Triple Bottom Line or 3BL accounting in their article “Gettingto the Bottom of ‘Triple Bottom Line’” (2004). This response suggests that, while limitations to 3BL accounting do exist, the critique of Norman and MacDonald is deeply flawed.
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  8.  16
    Rescuing the Baby From the Triple-Bottom-Line Bathwater: A Reply to Pava.Chris MacDonald & Wayne Norman - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):111-114.
    We respond to Moses Pava’s defense of the “Triple Bottom Line” concept against our earlier criticisms. We argue that, pacePava, the multiplicity of measures that go into evaluating ethical performance cannot reasonably be compared to the handful of standard methods for evaluating financial performance. We also question Pava’s claim that usage of the term “3BL” is somehow intended to be ironical or subversive.
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  9.  10
    Triple Bottom-Line Reporting as Social Grammar: Integrating Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Codes of Conduct.Mollie Painter-Morland - 2006 - Business Ethics 15 (4):352–364.
    This paper argues that many objections against, and limitations of, corporate codes of conduct can be addressed if a meaningful integration can be established between CSR and ethics management practices within corporations. It is proposed that the notion of the triple bottomline finally presents corporations with a mechanism to establish this integration. The paper draws on the second South African King Report on Corporate Governance, which succeeded in integrating corporate governance, ethics management and triple bottom (...) reporting by advocating what it called ‘Integrated Sustainability’. The paper argues that this is an example of how ethics management initiatives like code development become more meaningful, if they can be related to the corporation's CSR initiatives and reporting practices. Integration between ethics management and CSR in the context of triple bottomline reporting reframes corporate success in a way that makes both ethics management and CSR activities more meaningful. In fact, it is argued that in the absence of a social grammar that establishes this integration, neither codes nor CSR can foster meaningful organizational integrity. (shrink)
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  10.  8
    Resources and Capabilities of Triple Bottom Line Firms: Going Over Old or Breaking New Ground?Ante Glavas & Jenny Mish - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):623-642.
    Supported by a qualitative study of triple bottom line firms—those that simultaneously prioritize economic, social, and environmental objectives—we investigated the market logic and practices of TBL firms to better understand how they fulfill their mission and achieve their goals. We explored if and how TBL firms may differ in their approach to stakeholders and the management of their resources, including dynamic capabilities. We employed a research design that emphasizes the iterative comparison of narrative data within themselves and (...)
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  11.  51
    Getting to the Bottom of “Triple Bottom Line”.Chris MacDonald - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (2):243-262.
    In this paper, we examine critically the notion of “Triple Bottom Line” accounting. We begin by asking just what it is that supporters of the Triple Bottom Line idea advocate, and attempt to distil specific, assessable claims from the vague, diverse, and sometimescontradictory uses of the Triple Bottom Line rhetoric. We then use these claims as a basis upon which to argue (a) that what issound about the idea of a (...) Bottom Line is not novel, and (b) that what is novel about the idea is not sound. We argue on bothconceptual and practical grounds that the Triple Bottom Line is an unhelpful addition to current discussions of corporate social responsibility. Finally, we argue that the Triple Bottom Line paradigm cannot be rescued simply by attenuating its claims: the rhetoric isbadly misleading, and may in fact provide a smokescreen behind which firms can avoid truly effective social and environmental reporting and performance. (shrink)
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  12.  47
    Quantifying the Social Dimension of Triple Bottom Line: Development of a Framework and Indicators to Assess the Social Impact of Organisations.Evonne Miller, Laurie Buys & Jennifer Summerville - 2007 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (3):223-237.
    Triple Bottom Line (TBL) reports, outlining the economic, environmental and social impact of organisations, are increasingly viewed as a business requirement. Unfortunately, despite global frameworks, there is no one established standard against which to evaluate the social dimension. Thus, current social reporting is often disparagingly described as a public relations exercise with limited accountability, consistency or comparability. This article outlines the development of a generic TBL social impact framework and questionnaire designed to quantify an organisation's social impact. (...)
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  13.  15
    Rescuing the Baby From the Triple-Bottom-Line.Wayne Norman - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):111-114.
    We respond to Moses Pava’s defense of the “Triple Bottom Line” (3BL) concept against our earlier criticisms. We argue that, pacePava, the multiplicity of measures (and units of measure) that go into evaluating ethical performance cannot reasonably be compared to the handful of standard methods for evaluating financial performance. We also question Pava’s claim that usage of the term “3BL” is somehow intended to be ironical or subversive.
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  14. Rescuing the Baby From the Triple-Bottom-Line: A Reply to Pava.Chris Macdonald & Wayne Norman - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (1):111-114.
    We respond to Moses Pava’s defense of the “Triple Bottom Line” concept against our earlier criticisms. We argue that, pacePava, the multiplicity of measures that go into evaluating ethical performance cannot reasonably be compared to the handful of standard methods for evaluating financial performance. We also question Pava’s claim that usage of the term “3BL” is somehow intended to be ironical or subversive.
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  15.  26
    Triple Bottom Line – a Vaulting Ambition?Jan Tullberg - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (3):310-324.
    Triple bottom line has been a popular slogan hinting at introducing a model to evaluate environmental and social impact. Just hinting, without delivering, can be seen as misleading, but the expressed ambition might deserve to be pursued rather than abandoned. Here, a sketchy model is developed about how to construct a net value that has an informative and relevant content. The problems and benefits of this model should be judged in comparison with the problems and benefits of (...)
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  16.  4
    Corporate Governance and Sustainability Performance: Analysis of Triple Bottom Line Performance.Nazim Hussain, Ugo Rigoni & René P. Orij - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (2):411-432.
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  17.  3
    Triple Bottom-Line Reporting as Social Grammar: Integrating Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Codes of Conduct.Mollie Painter-Morland - 2006 - Business Ethics: A European Review 15 (4):352-364.
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  18.  27
    A Multi-Dimensional Criticism of the Triple Bottom Line Reporting Approach.Kaushik Sridhar - 2011 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 6 (1):49-67.
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  19.  53
    John Elkington, Cannibals with Forks: The Triple Bottom Line of 21st Century Business. [REVIEW]Ronald Jeurissen - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):229-231.
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    Triple Bottom Line - a Vaulting Ambition?Jan Tullberg - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (3):310-324.
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  21. Achieving Shared Triple Bottom Line Value Creation: Toward a Social Resource-Based View of the Firm.Wendy L. Tate & Lydia Bals - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):803-826.
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  22.  13
    Agrarian Ideals, Sustainability Ethics, and US Policy: A Critique for Practitioners. [REVIEW]Elisabeth Graffy - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):503-528.
    Abstract If tacit ethical ideals shape policy and practice, even when practitioners are not fully aware of underlying philosophical assumptions, then philosophical frameworks that support diagnostic, evaluative, and adaptive capacity in the sphere of action are critical to sustainability. Thompson’s agrarian-influenced sustainability framework substantially advances beyond the prevailing triple bottom line approach, as experimental evaluation of biofuels sustainability illustrates. By suggesting that governance of complex social-natural systems lies at the core of contemporary sustainability challenges, Thompson illuminates (...)
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    The Financial Impact of ISO 14001 Certification: Top-Line, Bottom-Line, or Both?Pieter Jong, Antony Paulraj & Constantin Blome - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):131-149.
    It is not easy being green, but it does beg the question: Does being green pay off on the bottom-line? Unfortunately, that question of becoming ISO 14001 to reap financial benefit remains widely unanswered. In particular, corporate practice is interested in how environmental management impacts firms’ finance through top-line impact, bottom-line impact, or both—as this paves the way for an investment of environmental management. As current findings are mixed, our study tracks financial performance of publicly (...)
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  24.  16
    Tensions in Corporate Sustainability: Towards an Integrative Framework.Tobias Hahn, Jonatan Pinkse, Lutz Preuss & Frank Figge - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (2):297-316.
    This paper proposes a systematic framework for the analysis of tensions in corporate sustainability. The framework is based on the emerging integrative view on corporate sustainability, which stresses the need for a simultaneous integration of economic, environmental and social dimensions without, a priori, emphasising one over any other. The integrative view presupposes that firms need to accept tensions in corporate sustainability and pursue different sustainability aspects simultaneously even if they seem to contradict each other. The framework proposed in this paper (...)
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  25.  47
    Why Corporations Should Not Abandon Social Responsibility.Moses L. Pava - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (4):805-812.
    Former U.S. Secretary of Labor Robert Reich, in his recent book Supercapitalism: The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life (2007), rejects outright the call for increased corporate social responsibility. He believes that social responsibility advocates are wasting resources and efforts on a doomed project. This article suggests that while Reich raises several interesting concerns in his counter-intuitive book, especially about the rise in corporate political power, ultimately his argument is unconvincing. Worse yet, a careful reading suggests that Reich does (...)
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  26.  58
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Is It Rewarded by the Corporate Bond Market? A Critical Note. [REVIEW]Klaus-Michael Menz - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):117-134.
    The question of whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) has a positive impact on firm value has been almost exclusively analysed from the perspective of the stock market. We have therefore investigated the relationship between the valuation of Euro corporate bonds and the standards of CSR of mainly European companies for the first time in this article. Generally, the debt market exhibits a considerable weight for corporate finance, for which reason creditors should basically play a significant role in the transmission of (...)
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    Using a Faculty Survey to Kick-Start an Ethics Curriculum Upgrade.Montgomery Van Wart, David Baker & Anna Ni - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (4):571-585.
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    Reflections on Business Decision-Making: Time for a Paradigm Shift? [REVIEW]Martin Kelly & Graham Oliver - 2003 - Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):199-215.
    Over the past few decades the pace of change in the business environment has been rapid, as the effects of electronic innovations and the acceptance of the globalisation mind-set have occurred. Communism has collapsed and the power of corporations has grown in the global community that has developed. It has become imperative that business decision-makers become aware that their decisions may limit the choices of future generations by irretrievably destroying the currently existing physical and social environment. Decision-making in today's business (...)
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    A Study of the Fitness of Color Combinations in Duple and in Triple Rhythm, to Line Designs.I. G. Campbell - 1942 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (4):311.
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    Profits and Principles: Four Perspectives. [REVIEW]Johan J. Graafland - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (4):293 - 305.
    This article clarifies the relationship between profits and principles by distinguishing four alternative perspectives: the win-win perspective in which ethical behaviour generates the highest profits; a licence-to-operate perspective in which a minimum ethical performance is required to receive legitimation from the society; an acceptable profits perspective, in which an acceptable profitability is required to assure the financial continuity; and an integrated perspective. These four perspectives are illustrated by statements from Shell reports and from interviews with managers of a large European (...)
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  31.  78
    Getting to the Bottom Line: An Exploration of Gender and Earnings Quality.Gopal V. Krishnan & Linda M. Parsons - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):65-76.
    For stakeholders, such as investors and lenders, to appropriately assess a company's financial performance, the reported accounting earnings must closely reflect the economic reality of the organization's financial activity throughout the reporting period. The degree to which reported earnings capture economic reality is called earnings quality. Managers have an ethical obligation to report high quality earnings to interested stakeholders in a timely matter. Accounting research has identified conditions within an organization, such as management compensation contracts and pending litigation that can (...)
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  32.  4
    Why Moral Followers Quit: Examining the Role of Leader Bottom-Line Mentality and Unethical Pro-Leader Behavior.Salar Mesdaghinia, Anushri Rawat & Shiva Nadavulakere - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Many business leaders vigorously and single-mindedly pursue bottom-line outcomes with the hope of producing superior results for themselves and their companies. Our study investigated two drawbacks of such leader bottom-line mentality. First, based on leaders’ power over followers, we hypothesized that leader BLM promotes unethical pro-leader behaviors among followers. Second, based on cognitive dissonance theory, we hypothesized that UPLB, and leader BLM via UPLB, increase turnover intention among employees with a strong moral identity. Data collected from (...)
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  33.  1
    Evaluating the Double Bottom-Line of Social Banking in an Emerging Country: How Efficient Are Public Banks in Supporting Priority and Non-Priority Sectors in India?Almudena Martínez-Campillo, Mahinda Wijesiri & Peter Wanke - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    India is the emerging country with the world’s greatest social banking program, so Indian banks are required to finance the weaker sectors of society that are excluded from the traditional financial system, while also providing mainstream banking services to non-priority sectors. For social banks to promote the ethical–social management of their dual mission and to be successful in today’s business environment, they must be as efficient as possible in both dimensions of their banking activity. Whereas the efficiency of Indian banks (...)
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    The Blackboard and The Bottom Line: Why Schools Can't Be Businesses. Larry Cuban. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 2005. Pp. 253. $23.95. [REVIEW]Aaron Cooley - 2007 - Educational Studies 41 (3):268-276.
    (2007). The Blackboard and The Bottom Line: Why Schools Can't Be Businesses. Larry Cuban. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 2005. Pp. 253. $23.95. Educational Studies: Vol. 41, No. 3, pp. 268-276.
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  35. Clinton's Bottom Line.Noam Chomsky - unknown
    November 17 was a grand day in the career of Bill Clinton, the day when he proved that he is a man of firm principle, and that his "vision" -- the term has become a journalistic reflex -- has real substance. "President Emerges As a Tough Fighter," the New York Times announced on the front page the next day. Washington correspondent R.W. Apple wrote that Clinton had now silenced his detractors, who had scorned him for his apparent willingness to back (...)
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  36. Ethics Incorporated: Top Priority and Bottom Line.Dipankar Gupta - 2006 - Response Books.
    This pioneering book discusses the role of ethics in today’s fiercely competitive business environment. The author examines in detail how business ethics and values contribute to effective business practices. The book approaches this important subject from the perspective of leadership and maintains that thinking in terms of business ethics is really thinking leadership. The book illustrates how if top management has a clear focus on ethics it brings about more competitiveness, creativity, cohesion and direction in business practices. The book also (...)
     
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  37.  36
    Taming the Unruly Side of Ethics: Overcoming Challenges of a Bottom-Up Approach to Ethics in the Areas of Food Policy and Climate Change. [REVIEW]Raymond Anthony - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):813-841.
    Here, I investigate the challenges involved in addressing ethical questions related to food policy, food security, and climate change in a public engagement atmosphere where “experts” (e.g., scientists and scholars), policy-makers and laypersons interact. My focus is on the intersection between food and climate in the state of Alaska, located in the circumpolar north. The intersection of food security and climate represents a “wicked problem.” This wicked problem is plagued by “unruliness,” characterized by disruptive mechanisms that can impede (...)
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    Corporate Motives for Social Initiative: Legitimacy, Sustainability, or the Bottom Line[REVIEW]Peggy Simcic Brønn & Deborah Vidaver-Cohen - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):91 - 109.
    This article presents results of exploratory research conducted with managers from over 500 Norwegian companies to examine corporate motives for engaging in social initiatives. Three key questions were addressed. First, what do managers in this sample see as the primary reasons their companies engage in activities that benefit society? Second, do motives for such social initiative vary across the industries represented? Third, can further empirical support be provided for the theoretical classifications of social initiative motives outlined in the literature? Previous (...)
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  39. Death and Furniture: The Rhetoric, Politics and Theology of Bottom Line Arguments Against Relativism.Derek Edwards, Malcolm Ashmore & Jonathan Potter - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (2):25-49.
  40.  23
    Corporate Social Performance as a Bottom Line for Consumers.May-May Meijer & Theo Schuyt - 2005 - Business and Society 44 (4):442-461.
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  41. Beyond the Bottom Line: How Business Leaders Are Turning Principles Into Profits.Tad Tuleja - 1985 - Penguin Books.
     
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  42. The Impossible Bottom Line.Lloyd Reinhardt - 2005 - Analysis 65 (4):341–342.
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  43.  96
    Beyond the Bottom Line: The Theoretical Goals of Moral Theorizing.Jason Brennan - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (2):277-296.
    Moral theory is no substitute for virtue, but virtue is no substitute for moral theory. Many critics of moral theory, with Richard Posner being one prominent recent example, complain that moral theory is too abstract, that it cannot generally be used to derive particular rights and wrongs, and that it does not improve people's characters. Posner complains that it is thus of no use to legal theorists. This article defends moral theory, and to some degree, philosophical inquiry in general, against (...)
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    The Impossible Bottom Line.L. Reinhardt - 2005 - Analysis 65 (4):341-342.
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  45. Intellectual Compromise: The Bottom Line.Michael T. Ghiselin - 1989 - Paragon House.
  46. Heidegger and Schmitt: The Bottom Line.Martin Heidegger - 1987 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 172:132.
     
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  47. Is There Integrity in the Bottom Line.Donald M. Wolfe - 1988 - In Suresh Srivastva (ed.), Executive Integrity: The Search for High Human Values in Organizational Life. Jossey-Bass.
     
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  48. The Bottom Line: Chinese Pidgin Russian.Johanna Nichols - 1986 - In Wallace L. Chafe & Johanna Nichols (eds.), Evidentiality: The Linguistic Coding of Epistemology. Ablex. pp. 239--257.
     
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  49.  12
    Business Ethics: The Bottom Line.Debbie D. Dufrene - 2003 - Teaching Business Ethics 7 (2):183-184.
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  50.  2
    Old Guards, Young Turks, and the $64,000 Question: What Is Business Ethics?Above the Bottom Line: An Introduction to Business Ethics. [REVIEW]Steven Olson & Robert C. Solomon - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):371.
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