Results for 'Turing machine'

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  1. Accelerating Turing Machines.B. Jack Copeland - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (2):281-300.
    Accelerating Turing machines are Turing machines of a sort able to perform tasks that are commonly regarded as impossible for Turing machines. For example, they can determine whether or not the decimal representation of contains n consecutive 7s, for any n; solve the Turing-machine halting problem; and decide the predicate calculus. Are accelerating Turing machines, then, logically impossible devices? I argue that they are not. There are implications concerning the nature of effective procedures and (...)
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  2.  78
    Infinite Time Turing Machines.Joel David Hamkins & Andy Lewis - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (2):567-604.
    Infinite time Turing machines extend the operation of ordinary Turing machines into transfinite ordinal time. By doing so, they provide a natural model of infinitary computability, a theoretical setting for the analysis of the power and limitations of supertask algorithms.
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  3. The Turing Machine on the Dissecting Table.Jana Horáková - 2013 - Teorie Vědy / Theory of Science 35 (2):269-288.
    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century there has been an increasing awareness that software rep- resents a blind spot in new media theory. The growing interest in software also influences the argument in this paper, which sets out from the assumption that Alan M. Turing's concept of the universal machine, the first theoretical description of a computer program, is a kind of bachelor machine. Previous writings based on a similar hypothesis have focused either on a comparison (...)
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  4. Even Turing Machines Can Compute Uncomputable Functions.Jack Copeland - unknown
    Accelerated Turing machines are Turing machines that perform tasks commonly regarded as impossible, such as computing the halting function. The existence of these notional machines has obvious implications concerning the theoretical limits of computability.
     
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  5. Super Turing-Machines.Jack Copeland - 1998 - Complexity 4 (1):30-32.
    The tape is divided into squares, each square bearing a single symbol—'0' or '1', for example. This tape is the machine's general-purpose storage medium: the machine is set in motion with its input inscribed on the tape, output is written onto the tape by the head, and the tape serves as a short-term working memory for the results of intermediate steps of the computation. The program governing the particular computation that the machine is to perform is also (...)
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  6. Super Turing-Machines.B. Jack Copeland - 1998 - Complexity 4 (1):30-32.
  7. Do Accelerating Turing Machines Compute the Uncomputable?B. Jack Copeland & Oron Shagrir - 2011 - Minds and Machines 21 (2):221-239.
    Accelerating Turing machines have attracted much attention in the last decade or so. They have been described as “the work-horse of hypercomputation”. But do they really compute beyond the “Turing limit”—e.g., compute the halting function? We argue that the answer depends on what you mean by an accelerating Turing machine, on what you mean by computation, and even on what you mean by a Turing machine. We show first that in the current literature the (...)
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  8. Infinite Time Turing Machines.Joel David Hamkins - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (4):567-604.
    Infinite time Turing machines extend the operation of ordinary Turing machines into transfinite ordinal time. By doing so, they provide a natural model of infinitary computability, a theoretical setting for the analysis of the power and limitations of supertask algorithms.
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  9.  29
    Turing Machines.David Barker-Plummer - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  10.  99
    We Turing Machines Aren't Expected-Utility Maximizers (Even Ideally).Vann McGee - 1991 - Philosophical Studies 64 (1):115 - 123.
  11.  32
    Turing Machines and the Spectra of First-Order Formulas.Neil D. Jones & Alan L. Selman - 1974 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 39 (1):139-150.
  12. Beyond the Universal Turing Machine.Jack Copeland - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):46-67.
    We describe an emerging field, that of nonclassical computability and nonclassical computing machinery. According to the nonclassicist, the set of well-defined computations is not exhausted by the computations that can be carried out by a Turing machine. We provide an overview of the field and a philosophical defence of its foundations.
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  13. The Human Turing Machine: A Neural Framework for Mental Programs.Ariel Zylberberg, Stanislas Dehaene, Pieter R. Roelfsema & Mariano Sigman - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (7):293-300.
  14.  73
    Turing Machines and Mental Reports.Robert H. Kane - 1966 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):344-52.
  15.  12
    Infinite Time Turing Machines.Joel Hamkins & Andy Lewis - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (2):567-604.
    We extend in a natural way the operation of Turing machines to infinite ordinal time, and investigate the resulting supertask theory of computability and decidability on the reals. Every $\Pi^1_1$ set, for example, is decidable by such machines, and the semi-decidable sets form a portion of the $\Delta^1_2$ sets. Our oracle concept leads to a notion of relative computability for sets of reals and a rich degree structure, stratified by two natural jump operators.
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  16.  61
    The Turing Machine May Not Be the Universal Machine.Matjaz Gams - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (1):137-142.
    Can mind be modeled as a Turing machine? If you find such questions irrelevant, e.g. because the subject is already exhausted, then you need not read the book Mind versus Computer (Gams et al., 1991). If, on the other hand, you do find such questions relevant, then perhaps you need not read Dunlop's review of the book (Dunlop, 2000). (...).
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  17. Turing Machines and Causal Mechanisms in Cognitive Science.Otto Lappi & Anna-Mari Rusanen - 2011 - In Phyllis McKay Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality in the Sciences. Oxford University Press. pp. 224--239.
     
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  18.  18
    Turing Machines, Computers and Artificial Intelligence.Peter R. Krebs - unknown
    This work investigates some of the issues and consequences for the field of artificial intelligence and cognitive science, which are related to the perceived limits of computation with current digital equipment. The Church -Turing thesis and the specific properties of Turing machines are examined and some of the philosophical 'in principle' objections, such as the application of Gödel's incompleteness theorem, are discussed. It is argued that the misinterpretation of the Church-Turing thesis has led to unfounded assumptions about (...)
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  19.  74
    The Irrelevance of Turing Machines to Artificial Intelligence.Aaron Sloman - 2002 - In Matthias Scheutz (ed.), Computationalism: New Directions. MIT Press.
    The common view that the notion of a Turing machine is directly relevant to AI is criticised. It is argued that computers are the result of a convergence of two strands of development with a long history: development of machines for automating various physical processes and machines for performing abstract operations on abstract entities, e.g. doing numerical calculations. Various aspects of these developments are analysed, along with their relevance to AI, and the similarities between computers viewed in this (...)
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  20.  33
    Infinite Time Turing Machines With Only One Tape.D. E. Seabold & J. D. Hamkins - 2001 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 47 (2):271-287.
    Infinite time Turing machines with only one tape are in many respects fully as powerful as their multi-tape cousins. In particular, the two models of machine give rise to the same class of decidable sets, the same degree structure and, at least for partial functions f : ℝ → ℕ, the same class of computable functions. Nevertheless, there are infinite time computable functions f : ℝ → ℝ that are not one-tape computable, and so the two models of (...)
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  21.  11
    Turing Machine Arguments.R. J. Nelson - 1980 - Philosophy of Science 47 (4):630-633.
    In I used Turing machine arguments to show that computers can recognize humanly recognizable patterns in principle. In 1978 James D. Heffernan has expressed some doubts about such arguments. He does not question the propositions that I defend in the paper, nor the specific arguments in their support. What he does criticize are certain background assumptions.
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  22. Turing Machines and the Mind-Body Problem.J. J. Clarke - 1972 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 23 (February):1-12.
  23.  23
    Universal Turing Machines: An Exercise in Coding.Hao Wang - 1957 - Zeitschrift fur mathematische Logik und Grundlagen der Mathematik 3 (6-10):69-80.
  24.  41
    Eventually Infinite Time Turing Machine Degrees: Infinite Time Decidable Reals.P. D. Welch - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (3):1193-1203.
    We characterise explicitly the decidable predicates on integers of Infinite Time Turing machines, in terms of admissibility theory and the constructible hierarchy. We do this by pinning down ζ, the least ordinal not the length of any eventual output of an Infinite Time Turing machine (halting or otherwise); using this the Infinite Time Turing Degrees are considered, and it is shown how the jump operator coincides with the production of mastercodes for the constructible hierarchy; further that (...)
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  25.  66
    On Turing Machines Knowing Their Own Gödel-Sentences.Neil Tennant - 2001 - Philosophia Mathematica 9 (1):72-79.
    Storrs McCall appeals to a particular true but improvable sentence of formal arithmetic to argue, by appeal to its irrefutability, that human minds transcend Turing machines. Metamathematical oversights in McCall's discussion of the Godel phenomena, however, render invalid his philosophical argument for this transcendentalist conclusion.
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  26.  9
    Turing Machines, Finite Automata and Neural Nets.Michael Arbib - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (3):482-482.
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  27. Are Turing Machines Platonists? Inferentialism and the Computational Theory of Mind.Jon Cogburn & Jason Megil - 2010 - Minds and Machines 20 (3):423-439.
    We first discuss Michael Dummett’s philosophy of mathematics and Robert Brandom’s philosophy of language to demonstrate that inferentialism entails the falsity of Church’s Thesis and, as a consequence, the Computational Theory of Mind. This amounts to an entirely novel critique of mechanism in the philosophy of mind, one we show to have tremendous advantages over the traditional Lucas-Penrose argument.
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  28. The Myth of the Turing Machine: The Failings of Functionalism and Related Theses.Chris Eliasmith - 2002 - Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Artificial Intelligence 14 (1):1-8.
    The properties of Turing’s famous ‘universal machine’ has long sustained functionalist intuitions about the nature of cognition. Here, I show that there is a logical problem with standard functionalist arguments for multiple realizability. These arguments rely essentially on Turing’s powerful insights regarding computation. In addressing a possible reply to this criticism, I further argue that functionalism is not a useful approach for understanding what it is to have a mind. In particular, I show that the difficulties involved (...)
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  29.  64
    We Turing Machines Can't Even Be Locally Ideal Bayesians.Beau Madison Mount - 2016 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 5 (4):285-290.
    Vann McGee has argued that, given certain background assumptions and an ought-implies-can thesis about norms of rationality, Bayesianism conflicts globally with computationalism due to the fact that Robinson arithmetic is essentially undecidable. I show how to sharpen McGee's result using an additional fact from recursion theory—the existence of a computable sequence of computable reals with an uncomputable limit. In conjunction with the countable additivity requirement on probabilities, such a sequence can be used to construct a specific proposition to which Bayesianism (...)
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  30.  72
    Beyond the Universal Turing Machine.B. Jack Copeland & Richard Sylvan - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (1):46-66.
  31.  49
    Intension in Terms of Turing Machines.Pavel Tichý - 1969 - Studia Logica 24 (1):7 - 25.
  32.  55
    Intuitionists Are Not (Turing) Machines.Crispin Wright - 1995 - Philosophia Mathematica 3 (1):86-102.
    Lucas and Penrose have contended that, by displaying how any characterisation of arithmetical proof programmable into a machine allows of diagonalisation, generating a humanly recognisable proof which eludes that characterisation, Gödel's incompleteness theorem rules out any purely mechanical model of the human intellect. The main criticisms of this argument have been that the proof generated by diagonalisation (i) will not be humanly recognisable unless humans can grasp the specification of the object-system (Benacerraf); and (ii) counts as a proof only (...)
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  33. The Irrelevance of Turing Machines to AI.Aaron Sloman - 2002 - In Matthias Scheutz (ed.), Computationalism: New Directions. MIT Press.
  34.  6
    Simulating Turing Machines on Maurer Machines.J. A. Bergstra & C. A. Middelburg - 2008 - Journal of Applied Logic 6 (1):1-23.
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  35.  11
    Universal Turing Machines: An Exercise in Coding.Hao Wang - 1957 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 3 (6‐10):69-80.
  36.  12
    Infinite Time Turing Machines.Joel David Hamkins - 2002 - Minds and Machines 12 (4):521-539.
    Infinite time Turing machines extend the operation of ordinary Turing machines into transfinite ordinal time. By doing so, they provide a natural model of infinitary computability, a theoretical setting for the analysis of the power and limitations of supertask algorithms.
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  37.  13
    Turing-Machine Computable Functionals of Finite Types I.S. C. Kleene, Ernest Nagel, Patrick Suppes & Alfred Tarski - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (4):588-589.
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  38.  41
    A Universal Turing Machine with Two Internal States.Claude E. Shannon - 1971 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (3):532-532.
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  39. Can a Turing Machine Know That the Gödel Sentence is True?Storrs McCall - 1999 - Journal of Philosophy 96 (10):525-532.
  40.  5
    Turing Machine-Inspired Computer Science Results.Juris Hartmanis - 2012 - In S. Barry Cooper (ed.), How the World Computes. pp. 276--282.
  41.  5
    Eventually Infinite Time Turing Machine Degrees: Infinite Time Decidable Reals.P. D. Welch - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (3):1193-1203.
    We characterise explicitly the decidable predicates on integers of Infinite Time Turing machines, in terms of admissibility theory and the constructible hierarchy. We do this by pinning down $\zeta$, the least ordinal not the length of any eventual output of an Infinite Time Turing machine ; using this the Infinite Time Turing Degrees are considered, and it is shown how the jump operator coincides with the production of mastercodes for the constructible hierarchy; further that the natural (...)
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  42.  58
    Representing the Knowledge of Turing Machines.Hyun Song Shin & Timothy Williamson - 1994 - Theory and Decision 37 (1):125-146.
  43.  47
    Physical Oracles: The Turing Machine and the Wheatstone Bridge.Edwin J. Beggs, José Félix Costa & John V. Tucker - 2010 - Studia Logica 95 (1-2):279-300.
    Earlier, we have studied computations possible by physical systems and by algorithms combined with physical systems. In particular, we have analysed the idea of using an experiment as an oracle to an abstract computational device, such as the Turing machine. The theory of composite machines of this kind can be used to understand (a) a Turing machine receiving extra computational power from a physical process, or (b) an experimenter modelled as a Turing machine performing (...)
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  44. Philosophy and Science, the Darwinian-Evolved Computational Brain, a Non-Recursive Super-Turing Machine & Our Inner-World-Producing Organ.Hermann G. W. Burchard - 2016 - Open Journal of Philosophy 6 (1):13-28.
    Recent advances in neuroscience lead to a wider realm for philosophy to include the science of the Darwinian-evolved computational brain, our inner world producing organ, a non-recursive super- Turing machine combining 100B synapsing-neuron DNA-computers based on the genetic code. The whole system is a logos machine offering a world map for global context, essential for our intentional grasp of opportunities. We start from the observable contrast between the chaotic universe vs. our orderly inner world, the noumenal cosmos. (...)
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  45.  29
    Some Doubts About Turing Machine Arguments.James D. Heffernan - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (December):638-647.
    In his article “On Mechanical Recognition” R. J. Nelson brings to bear a branch of mathematical logic called automata theory on problems of artificial intelligence. Specifically he attacks the anti-mechanist claim that “[i]nasmuch as human recognition to a very great extent relies on context and on the ability to grasp wholes with some independence of the quality of the parts, even to fill in the missing parts on the basis of expectations, it follows that computers cannot in principle be programmed (...)
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  46. Computational Modeling Vs. Computational Explanation: Is Everything a Turing Machine, and Does It Matter to the Philosophy of Mind?Gualtiero Piccinini - 2007 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):93 – 115.
    According to pancomputationalism, everything is a computing system. In this paper, I distinguish between different varieties of pancomputationalism. I find that although some varieties are more plausible than others, only the strongest variety is relevant to the philosophy of mind, but only the most trivial varieties are true. As a side effect of this exercise, I offer a clarified distinction between computational modelling and computational explanation.<br><br>.
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  47.  8
    A Note on Universal Turing Machines.M. D. Davis & Martin Davis - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (4):590-590.
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  48.  6
    The Present Theory of Turing Machine Computability.C. E. M. Yates & Hartley Rogers - 1966 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 31 (3):513.
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  49.  29
    The Undecidability of the Turing Machine Immortality Problem.Philip K. Hooper - 1966 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 31 (2):219-234.
  50.  43
    Weaker Variants of Infinite Time Turing Machines.Matteo Bianchetti - 2020 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 59 (3-4):335-365.
    Infinite time Turing machines represent a model of computability that extends the operations of Turing machines to transfinite ordinal time by defining the content of each cell at limit steps to be the lim sup of the sequences of previous contents of that cell. In this paper, we study a computational model obtained by replacing the lim sup rule with an ‘eventually constant’ rule: at each limit step, the value of each cell is defined if and only if (...)
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