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Turner C. Nevitt
University of San Diego
  1.  24
    Aquinas on the Death of Christ: A New Argument for Corruptionism.Turner C. Nevitt - 2016 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 90 (1):77-99.
    Contemporary interpreters have entered a new debate over Aquinas’s view on the status of human beings or persons between death and resurrection. Everyone agrees that, for Aquinas, separated souls exist in the interim. The disagreement concerns what happens to human beings—Peter, Paul, and so on. According to corruptionists, Aquinas thought human beings cease to exist at death and only begin to exist again at the resurrection. According to survivalists, however, Aquinas thought human beings continue to exist in the interim, constituted (...)
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  2. Survivalism, Corruptionism, and Intermittent Existence in Aquinas.Turner C. Nevitt - 2014 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 31 (1):1-19.
    There is an important debate underway concerning Aquinas’s view about the status of persons in the interim period between death and resurrection. According to corruptionists, Aquinas believed that the person ceases to exist at death and only begins to exist again at the resurrection. Survivalists, on the other hand, deny this. According to them, the continued existence of the soul in the interim period between death and resurrection is sufficient for the continued existence of the person. One objection raised by (...)
     
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  3. How to Be an Analytic Existential Thomist.Turner C. Nevitt - 2018 - The Thomist 82 (3):321–352.
    This article explores the strategies available for defending Aquinas’s view of existence in the context of contemporary analytic philosophy. The rival view of existence prevalent among contemporary analytic philosophers is subject to serious objections. At the same time, the main contemporary analytic objections to Aquinas’s view can be adequately answered. The widespread use of “exist(s)” to ascribe existence to individuals and objects provides good reason to think that such use makes sense, and analogies like those of Aquinas can help to (...)
     
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  4. What Has Aquinas Got Against Platonic Forms?Turner C. Nevitt - 2018 - In Gyula Klima & Alex Hall (eds.), Hylomorphism and Mereology: Proceedings of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics Volume 15. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 67–79.
    Aquinas consistently criticizes Plato and his followers for their commitment to the existence of separate forms or ideas. There is no whiteness existing by itself apart from any particular white things or any particular person's thoughts about them. The same goes for every natural form, from humanity to heat. And yet Aquinas is happy to appeal to such separate forms as examples to illustrate his own metaphysical views. This seems like a strange and dangerous procedure. If Aquinas considers Platonic forms (...)
     
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  5.  28
    Thomism and Tolerance, by John F. X. Knasas. [REVIEW]Turner C. Nevitt - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (3):377-379.
  6.  23
    Sensation in Aristotle: Some Problematic Contemporary Interpretations and a Medieval Solution.Turner C. Nevitt - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:195-211.
    Richard Sorabji and Myles Burnyeat have developed and defended rival interpretations of Aristotle’s account of sensation. Both agree in accepting the common terms of Aristotle’s account , but they disagree about how these terms are to be understood. In this paper I consider these rival interpretations, examining the best arguments for each and raising new objections to both. I argue that each contemporary interpretation, in its own way, faces the same problem—the inability to accommodate everything that Aristotle says in his (...)
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  7.  21
    Book Notices. [REVIEW]Turner C. Nevitt - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):140-141.
  8. Annihilation, Re-Creation, and Intermittent Existence in Aquinas.Turner C. Nevitt - 2016 - In Stephen Ogden, Gyula Klima & Alex Hall (eds.), The Metaphysics of Personal Identity: Proceedings of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics Volume 13. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. pp. 101–117.
    Aquinas often defends the possibility of the resurrection of the dead by appealing to the survival of the human soul between death and resurrection. Contemporary interpreters suppose that Aquinas does so because he thinks the continued existence of the human soul is metaphysically necessary for the identity of human beings over time. If the human soul perished at death along with the human body, then not even God could bring the same human being back to life—so Aquinas is supposed to (...)
     
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  9. Don't Mind the Gap: A Reply to Adam Wood.Turner C. Nevitt - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Medieval Philosophy 4:198–213.
    Most contemporary interpreters of Aquinas think that he rejects the possibility of intermittent or “gappy” existence. Thus they think that the soul’s natural survival after death is a necessary part of Aquinas’s defense of the possibility of the resurrection. Yet this contemporary consensus rests on shaky foundations. For on the basis of a widely neglected quodlibet question, earlier interpreters of Aquinas as eminent as John Capreolus and Francis Sylvester Ferrara recognized that Aquinas reserves to God the power to annihilate material (...)
     
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  10.  16
    Thomas Aquinas's Quodlibetal Questions.Turner C. Nevitt & Brian Davies - 2019 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Aquinas was one of the most significant Christian thinkers of the middle ages and ranks among the greatest philosophers and theologians of all time. In the mid-thirteenth century, as a teacher at the University of Paris, Aquinas presided over public university-wide debates on questions that could be put forward by anyone about anything. The Quodlibetal Questions are Aquinas's edited records of these debates. Unlike his other disputed questions, which are limited to a few specific topics such as evil or (...)
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