Results for 'U. S. Lwara'

999 found
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  1.  98
    Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation of U.S. Organizations.Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen & Wesley J. Johnston - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):303 - 323.
    Organizations that believe they should "give something back" to the society have embraced the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Although the theoretical underpinnings of CSR have been frequently debated, empirical studies often involve only limited aspects, implying that theory may not be congruent with actual practices and may impede understanding and further development of CSR. The authors investigate actual CSR practices related to five different stakeholder groups, develop an instrument to measure those CSR practices, and apply it to a (...)
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  2.  79
    The Love of Money, Satisfaction, and the Protestant Work Ethic: Money Profiles Among Univesity Professors in the U.S.A. And Spain. [REVIEW]Roberto Luna-Arocas & Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):329-354.
    This study tests the hypothesis that university professors (lecturers) (in the U.S. and Spain) with different money profiles (based on Factors Success, Budget, Motivator, Equity, and Evil of the Love of Money Scale) will differ in work-related attitudes and satisfaction. Results suggested that Achieving Money Worshipers (with high scores on Factors Success, Motivator, Equity, and Budget) had high income, Work Ethic, and high satisfaction with pay level, pay administration, and internal equity comparison but low satisfaction with external equity comparison. Careless (...)
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  3. U.S.-American and German Business Ethics:An Intercultural Comparison. [REVIEW]Bettina Palazzo - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 41 (3):195 - 216.
    The differences between the "habits of the heart" in German and U.S.-American corporations can be described by analyzing the way corporations deal with norms and values within their organizations. Whereas many U.S. corporations have introduced formal business ethics programs, German companies are very reluctant to address normative questions publicly. This can be explained by the different cultural backgrounds in both countries. By defining these different "habits of the heart" underlying German and American business ethics it is possible to show the (...)
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  4.  53
    Business Ethics in Brazil and the U.S.: A Comparative Investigation. [REVIEW]Rafik I. Beekun, Yvonne Stedham & Jeanne H. Yamamura - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 42 (3):267 - 279.
    In this comparative survey of 126 Brazilian and U.S. business professionals, we explore the effect of national culture on ethical decision-making within the context of business. Using Reidenbach and Robin''s (1988) multi-criteria ethics instrument, we examined how these two countries'' differences on Hofstede''s individualism/collectivism dimension are related to the manner in which business practitioners make ethical decisions. Our results indicate that Brazilians and Americans evaluate the ethical content of actions or decisions differently when applying utilitarian criteria. By contrast, business people (...)
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  5.  39
    Utility of Ethical Frameworks in Determining Behavioral Intention: A Comparison of the U.S. And Russia.Rafik I. Beekun, Jim Westerman & Jamal Barghouti - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 61 (3):235-247.
    Using Reidenbach and Robin‘s ( Journal of Business Ethics 7, 871–879, 1988) multi-criteria ethics instrument, we carried out the first empirical test of Robertson and Crittenden‘s (Strategic Management Journal 24, 385–392, 2003) cross-cultural map of moral philosophies to examine what ethical criteria guide business people in Russia and the U.S. in their intention to behave. Competing divergence and convergence hypotheses were advanced. Our results support a convergence hypothesis, and reveal a common emphasis on relativism. Americans are also influenced by the (...)
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  6.  19
    Nuclear Energy in the Service of Biomedicine: The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission’s Radioisotope Program, 1946–1950. [REVIEW]Angela N. H. Creager - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (4):649 - 684.
    The widespread adoption of radioisotopes as tools in biomedical research and therapy became one of the major consequences of the "physicists' war" for postwar life science. Scientists in the Manhattan Project, as part of their efforts to advocate for civilian uses of atomic energy after the war, proposed using infrastructure from the wartime bomb project to develop a government-run radioisotope distribution program. After the Atomic Energy Bill was passed and before the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was formally established, the Manhattan (...)
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  7.  13
    Representing Indigenous Lifeways and Beliefs in U.S.-Mexico Border Indigenous Activist Discourse.Christina Leza - 2018 - Semiotica 2018 (224):223-248.
    Despite challenges for U.S.-Mexico border Indigenous activists in their efforts to counter dominant discourses about both border policy and Native rights, Indigenous activists assert their rights as they advocate for public policies and actions that affirm and protect these rights. This article explores some of the discursive strategies used by Indigenous activists to index Indigenous identities and lifeways and to counter mainstream conceptualizations of Native identity and Indigenous rights on the U.S.-Mexico border. Through such semiotic strategies, Indigenous border activists create (...)
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  8.  41
    The Gap Between Law and Ethics in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Overcoming the Effect of U.S. Federal Policy on Research Advances and Public Benefit.Patrick L. Taylor - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):589-616.
    Key ethical issues arise in association with the conduct of stem cell research by research institutions in the United States. These ethical issues, summarized in detail, receive no adequate translation into federal laws or regulations, also described in this article. U.S. Federal policy takes a passive approach to these ethical issues, translating them simply into limitations on taxpayer funding, and foregoes scientific and ethical leadership while protecting intellectual property interests through a laissez faire approach to stem cell patents and licenses. (...)
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  9.  19
    The Effect of the Governance Environment on Marketing Channel Behaviors: The Diamond Industries in the U.S., China, and Hong Kong. [REVIEW]Shaomin Li, Kiran Karande & Dongsheng Zhou - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):453 - 471.
    International differences in how market exchanges are conducted (e.g., the mode of entry, level of ownership, and conflict resolution) have been attributed mainly to national culture and cultural distance. However, the cultural arguments cannot explain why economies/countries with similar cultural backgrounds (e.g., Hong Kong and China) exhibit differences in exchange arrangements. Thus, the cultural arguments provide little strategic guidance to multinational corporations (MNCs) in international marketing. We propose that in addition to culture, the governance environment in a country, namely, the (...)
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  10. Equipping Police with Naloxone Spray and Decriminalizing All Opioid Use in the U.S.: An Ethical Analysis.Marvin J. H. Lee - 2018 - Journal of Healthcare Ethics and Administration 4 (2):17-25.
    The number of police departments carrying Narcan keeps increasing at a fast pace throughout the U.S., as it is considered an effective measure to fight the opioid epidemic. However, there have been strong oppositions to the idea of the police Narcan use. Still, in 2018, the nation is debating about it. Though not clearly visible to the public, there are important ethical arguments against the police Narcan use which necessarily involve understanding of the ethical roles and responsibilities of police as (...)
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  11.  71
    The Supply of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures Among U.S. Firms.Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey R. Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):497-527.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a dramatically expanding area of activity for managers and academics. Consumer demand for responsibly produced and fair trade goods is swelling, resulting in increased demands for CSR activity and information. Assets under professional management and invested with a social responsibility focus have also grown dramatically over the last 10 years. Investors choosing social responsibility investment strategies require access to information not provided through traditional financial statements and analyses. At the same time, a group of mainstream (...)
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  12.  45
    The Effects of Fraud and Lawsuit Revelation on U.S. Executive Turnover and Compensation.Obeua S. Persons - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (4):405-419.
    This study investigates the impact of fraud/lawsuit revelation on U.S. top executive turnover and compensation. It also examines potential explanatory variables affecting the executive turnover and compensation among U.S. fraud/lawsuit firms. Four important findings are documented. First, there was significantly higher executive turnover among U.S. firms with fraud/lawsuit revelation in the Wall Street Journal than matched firms without such revelation. Second, although on average, U.S. top executives received an increase in cash compensation after fraud/lawsuit revelation, this increase is smaller than (...)
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  13.  53
    The Impact of Corporate Ethical Values and Enforcement of Ethical Codes on the Perceived Importance of Ethics in Business: A Comparison of U.S. And Spanish Managers.Scott J. Vitell & Encarnación Ramos Hidalgo - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):31-43.
    This two country study examines the effect of corporate ethical values and enforcement of a code of ethics on perceptions of the role of ethics in the overall success of the firm. Additionally, the impact of organizational commitment and of individual variables such as ethical idealism and relativism was examined. The rationale for examining the perceived importance of the role of ethics in this manner is to determine the extent to which the organization itself can influence employee perceptions regarding ethics (...)
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  14.  30
    Shaping of Moral Intensity Regarding Software Piracy: A Comparison Between Thailand and U.S. Students. [REVIEW]Ranjan B. Kini, H. V. Ramakrishna & B. S. Vijayaraman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):91-104.
    Software piracy is a major global concern forbusinesses that generate their revenues throughsoftware products. Moral intensity regardingsoftware piracy has been argued to be relatedto the extent of software piracy. Anunderstanding of the development of moralintensity regarding software piracy inindividuals would aid businesses in developingand implementing policies that may help themreduce software piracy. In this research westudied the similarities and differences indevelopment of moral intensity regardingsoftware piracy among university students intwo different cultures, the U.S. and Thailand. In particular, we studied the (...)
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  15.  55
    Values and the Perceived Importance of Ethics and Social Responsibility: The U.S. Versus China.William E. Shafer, Kyoko Fukukawa & Grace Meina Lee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):265-284.
    This study examines the effects of nationality (U.S. vs. China) and personal values on managers’ responses to the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility (PRESOR) scale. Evidence that China’s transition to a socialist market economy has led to widespread business corruption, led us to hypothesize that People’s Republic of China (PRC) managers would believe less strongly in the importance of ethical and socially responsible business conduct. We also hypothesized that after controlling for national differences, managers’ personal values (more specifically, (...)
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  16.  26
    Emerging Trends in Global Ethics: A Comparative Study of U.S. And International Family Business Values. [REVIEW]Mark S. Blodgett, Colette Dumas & Alberto Zanzi - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):29-38.
    Although family business comprises the majority of global business, it is significantly under-researched. Yet it is considered to have unique ethical values compared to non-family corporations. This is attributable to its family orientation. Therefore, it is worthwhile to identify and define dominant family business ethics values. The authors compare a sample of the U.S. family business, U.S. corporate entities, and international family business mission statements for frequency of ethics values. The data reveals three primary findings: (1) generally, the U.S. family (...)
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  17.  43
    Corporate Citizenship Perspectives and Foreign Direct Investment in the U.S.Tammie S. Pinkston & Archie B. Carroll - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (3):157-169.
    As foreign direct investment in the U.S. continues to become both more visible and controversial, the general public remains skeptical about the corporate citizenship of these foreign affiliates. Four dimensions of corporate citizenship — orientations, organizational stakeholders, issues, and decision-making autonomy — were used to compare the inclinations of foreign affiliates with the domestic firms operating in the U.S. chemical industry. The only significant differences between the U.S. sample and those firms headquartered in other countries-of-origin were found in the area (...)
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  18.  32
    Critical Events in the Ethics of U.S. Corporation History.S. Douglas Beets - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (2):193-219.
    The history of corporations in the United States (U.S.) is much older than the country, as it must be understood in the context of the history of peoples of Europe who eventually dominated the North American continent in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. These European settlers came, in part, to achieve economic prosperity for themselves and, in many cases, for early forerunners of the modern corporation. These business organizations had predecessors in Europe millennia earlier as ancient Romans had developed a (...)
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  19.  38
    What Can We Learn From the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizational Ethics.Dove Izraeli & Mark S. Schwartz - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1045-1055.
    In November, 1991, the U.S. Congress enacted the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines legislation which had a dramatic impact on corporate America. Can the Guidelines be used as a model or framework by other countries? Could other countries in the world benefit from adopting a similar piece of legislation? Are there any limitations to consider? In addressing these issues, the authors make the argument that the time has arrived for other countries to consider the development of legislation similar to the Guidelines (...)
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  20.  19
    Are Conglomerates Less Environmentally Responsible? An Empirical Examination of Diversification Strategy and Subsidiary Pollution in the U.S. Chemical Industry.Robert S. Dooley & Gerald E. Fryxell - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (1):1 - 14.
    This study examines the relationship between corporate diversification strategy and the pollution activity of subsidiaries within the U.S. chemical industry using TRI data (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory). The subsidiaries of conglomerates were found to exhibit higher pollution levels for direct emissions than those of firms pursuing more related diversification strategies. Additionally, the subsidiaries of conglomerates exhibited more variance in overall pollution emissions compared to related diversified firms.
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  21.  14
    A Comparison of Canadian and U.S. CSR Strategic Alliances, CSR Reporting, and CSR Performance: Insights Into Implicit–Explicit CSR.Linda Thorne, Lois S. Mahoney, Kristen Gregory & Susan Convery - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):85-98.
    We considered the question of how corporate social responsibility differs between Canada and the U.S. Prior research has identified that national institutional differences exist between the two countries [Freeman and Hasnaoui, J Business Ethics 100:419–443, 2011], which may be associated with variations in their respective CSR practices. Matten and Moon [Acad Manag Rev 33:404–424, 2008] suggested that cross-national differences in firms’ CSR are depicted by an implicit–explicit conceptual framework: explicit CSR practices are deliberate and more strategic than implicit CSR practices. (...)
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  22.  12
    Flaws in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Rationale for Supporting the Development and Approval of BiDil as a Treatment for Heart Failure Only in Black Patients.George T. H. Ellison, Jay S. Kaufman, Rosemary F. Head, Paul A. Martin & Jonathan D. Kahn - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):449-457.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's rationale for supporting the development and approval of BiDil for heart failure specifically in black patients was based on under-powered, post hoc subgroup analyses of two relatively old trials , which were further complicated by substantial covariate imbalances between racial groups. Indeed, the only statistically significant difference observed between black and white patients was found without any adjustment for potential confounders in samples that were unlikely to have been adequately randomized. Meanwhile, because the accepted (...)
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  23.  45
    Business Ethical Values in China and the U.S.Laura L. Whitcomb, Carolyn B. Erdener & Chen Li - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (8):839-852.
    The research presented in this paper focuses on business ethical values inChina, a country in which the process of institutional transformation has left cultural values in a state of flux. A survey was conducted in China and the U.S. by using five business scenarios. Survey results show similarities between the Chinese and American decision choices for three out of five scenarios. However, the results reveal significant differences in rationales, even forsimilar decisions. The implications of similarities and differences between the U.S. (...)
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  24.  45
    From Swords to Plowshares: An Evaluation of the U.S. Legislative Attempts on Economic Conversion and Human Resource Planning.S. Muthuchidambaram - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):1-26.
    This paper deals with the genesis, development, and impact of Military Keynesianism in the U.S. Its impact on the civilian sector is examined in terms of: geographical distribution of military spending, sectoral militarization, labor market and occupational distortion, the militarization of R & D, R & D's impact on American competitiveness in the international market, the parasitic role of the military contract system and the unethical and exploitative role of military contractors. This paper exarnines the issues related to disarmament and (...)
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  25.  20
    Addressing the Legacy of the U.S. Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee: Optimal Health in Health Care Reform Philosophy.Rueben C. Warren, Luther S. Williams & Wylin D. Wilson - 2012 - Ethics and Behavior 22 (6):496-500.
    This article is guided by principles and practices of bioethics and public health ethics focused on health care reform within the context of promoting Optimal Health. The Tuskegee University National Center for Bioethics in Research and Health Care is moving beyond the traditions of bioethics to incorporate public health ethics and Optimal Health. It is imperative to remember the legacy of the ill-fated research entitled Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male. Human participant research and health care must (...)
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  26.  23
    Will You Really Protect Us Without a Gun? Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping in the U.S.Eli S. McCarthy - 2012 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 22 (2):29-48.
    The habits of direct violence in U.S. society continue to pose dangerous and dehumanizing trends. As scholars and activists cultivate alternatives to the use ofviolence, a key need involves providing direct experience for U.S. residents to explore and see the power of unarmed civilian peacekeeping. In this paper I ask the following questions: How can the international unarmed civilian peacekeeping models influence the U.S. in the form of domestic peace teams? What are the accomplishments and the challenges for local peace (...)
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  27.  6
    Comparing Thinking Style and Ethical Decision-Making Between Chinese and U.S. Students.Charles M. Vance, Judith A. White, Kevin S. Groves, Yongsun Paik & Lin Guo - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 13:117-146.
    This study provides a comparison of thinking style and ethical decision-making patterns between 386 U.S. students and 506 students from the People’s Republic of China enrolled in undergraduate business education in their respective countries. Contrary to our expectations, the Chinese students demonstrated a significantly greater linear thinking style compared to American students. As hypothesized, both Chinese and U.S. students possessing a balanced linear and nonlinear thinking style profile demonstrated greater ethical intent across a series of ethics vignettes. Chinese students also (...)
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  28.  16
    Development of the Objectivity Ethic in U.S. Daily Newspapers.Harlan S. Stensaas - 1986 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 2 (1):50 – 60.
    Objectivity is discussed as the underlying ethic of news reporting with an exploration of its origins. A content analysis of the general news reports in six selected U.S. daily newspapers found that objectivity was not widely practiced in 1865?1874, was common in 1905?1914, and normative by 1925?1984. Incidence of objective reporting was evidently not influenced by the introduction of the telegraph and wire services, and there is also no apparent difference between news reports of New York City newspapers and those (...)
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  29.  6
    Recent Developments in China–U.S. Cooperation in Science.Caroline S. Wagner, Lutz Bornmann & Loet Leydesdorff - 2015 - Minerva 53 (3):199-214.
    China’s remarkable gains in science over the past 25 years have been well documented but it is less well known that China and the United States have become each other’s top collaborating country. Science and technology has been a primary vehicle for growing the bilateral relationship between China and the United States since the opening of relations between the two countries in the late 1970s. During the early 2000s, the scientific relationship between China and the United States—as measured in coauthored (...)
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  30.  11
    Why is the Bishops' Letter on the U.S. Economy so Unconvincing?William S. Reece - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (7):553 - 560.
    This paper evaluates the rhetoric of the U.S. bishops' pastoral letter on the U.S. economy from two perspectives. Is the letter convincing? Does it conform to the conversational norms of civilization? The paper argues that the bishops' letter fails by both standards because it ignores serious research on the U.S. economy, it misstates important facts about the economy, and it sneers at professional economists. The paper concludes that the bishops' letter will not be convincing to well informed readers.
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  31.  63
    The Ethics of Organizations: A Longitudinal Study of the U.S. Working Population.Muel Kaptein - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):601-618.
    The ethics of organizations has received much attention in recent years. This raises the question of whether the ethics of organizations has also improved. In 1999, 2004, and 2008, a survey was conducted of 12,196 U.S. managers and employees. The results show that the ethical culture of organizations improved in the period between 1999 and 2004. Between 2004 and 2008 unethical behavior and its consequences declined and the scope of ethics programs expanded while ethical culture showed no significant improvement during (...)
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  32. Styles of Sociological Thought: Sociologies, Epistemologies, and the Mexican and U.S. Quests for Truth.Gabriel Abend - 2006 - Sociological Theory 24 (1):1-41.
    Both U.S. and Mexican sociologies allege that they are in the business of making true scientific knowledge claims about the social world. Conventional conceptions of science notwithstanding, I demonstrate that their claims to truth and scientificity are based on alternative epistemological grounds. Drawing a random sample of nonquantitative articles from four leading journals, I show that, first, they assign a different role to theories, and indeed they have dissimilar understandings of what a theory should consist of. Second, whereas U.S. sociology (...)
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  33.  38
    How Do Small and Medium Enterprises Go “Green”? A Study of Environmental Management Programs in the U.S. Wine Industry.Mark Cordano, R. Scott Marshall & Murray Silverman - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):463-478.
    In industries populated by small and medium enterprises, managers' good intentions frequently incur barriers to superior environmental performance (Tilley, Bus Strategy Environ 8:238-248, 1999). During the period when the U.S. wine industry was beginning to promote voluntary adoption of sound environmental practices, we examined managers' attitudes, norms, and perceptions of stakeholder pressures to assess their intentions to implement environmental management programs (EMP). We found that managers within the simple structures of these small and medium firms are responsive to attitudes, norms, (...)
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  34. The U.S. Military-Industrial Complex is Circumstantially Unethical.Edmund F. Byrne - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):153 - 165.
    Business ethicists should examine not only business practices but whether a particular type of business is even prima facie ethical. To illustrate how this might be done I here examine the contemporary U.S. defense industry. In the past the U.S. military has engaged in missions that arguably satisfied the just war self-defense rationale, thereby implying that its suppliers of equipment and services were ethical as well. Some recent U.S. military missions, however, arguably fail the self-defense rationale. At issue, then, is (...)
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  35.  44
    Women’s Roles on U.S. Fortune 500 Boards: Director Expertise and Committee Memberships. [REVIEW]Craig A. Peterson & James Philpot - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (2):177 - 196.
    This study examines the presence and roles of female directors of U.S. Fortune 500 firms, focusing on committee assignments and director background. Prior work from almost two decades ago concludes that there is a systematic bias against females in assignment to top board committees. Examining a recent data set with a logistic regression model that controls for director and firm characteristics, director resource-dependence roles and interaction between director gender and director characteristics, we find that female directors are less likely than (...)
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  36.  28
    The Moral Warrior: Ethics and Service in the U.S. Military.Martin L. Cook - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    Explores the moral dimensions of the current global role of the U.S. military.
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  37.  50
    A Survey of Governance Disclosures Among U.S. Firms.Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):543-563.
    Recent years have featured a spate of regulatory action pertaining to the development and/or disclosure of corporate governance structures in response to financial scandals resulting in part from governance failures. During the same period, corporate governance activists and institutional investors increasingly have called for increased voluntary governance disclosure. Despite this attention, there have been relatively few comprehensive studies of governance disclosure practices and response to the regulation. In this study, we examine a sample of 50 U.S. firms and their public (...)
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  38.  8
    Women’s Roles on U.S. Fortune 500 Boards: Director Expertise and Committee Memberships.Craig A. Peterson & James Philpot - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (2):177-196.
    This study examines the presence and roles of female directors of U.S. Fortune 500 firms, focusing on committee assignments and director background. Prior work from almost two decades ago concludes that there is a systematic bias against females in assignment to top board committees. Examining a recent data set with a logistic regression model that controls for director and firm characteristics, director resource-dependence roles and interaction between director gender and director characteristics, we find that female directors are less likely than (...)
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  39.  19
    The Impact of Operational Diversity on Corporate Philanthropy: An Empirical Study of U.S. Companies. [REVIEW]Jean D. Kabongo, Kiyoung Chang & Ying Li - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):49-65.
    This paper investigates the impact of diversity on corporate philanthropy. Compared to previous studies that have considered the influence of board diversity and CEO gender on corporate philanthropy, this study introduces the concept of operational diversity, which is the implementation of diversity programs at management, employee, and supply chain levels, and further, it explains why operational diversity influences corporate philanthropy, by using the premises of resource dependence theory. Second, this study also investigates the influence of board diversity on corporate philanthropy. (...)
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  40.  39
    Cultural and Ethical Effects in Budgeting Systems: A Comparison of U.S. And Chinese Managers.Patricia Casey Douglas & Benson Wier - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (2):159-174.
    This study developed and tested a model of culture’s effect on budgeting systems, and hypothesized that system variables and reactions to them are influenced by culture-specific work-related and ethical values. Most organizational and behavioral views of budgeting fail to acknowledge the ethical components of the problem, and have largely ignored the role of culture in shaping organizational and individual values. Cross-cultural differences in reactions to system design variables, and in the behaviors motivated or mitigated by those variables, has implications for (...)
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  41.  70
    An Investigation of Moral Values and the Ethical Content of the Corporate Culture: Taiwanese Versus U.S. Sales People. [REVIEW]Neil C. Herndon, John P. Fraedrich & Quey-Jen Yeh - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):73 - 85.
    An empirical study using two ethics-related and three sales force outcome variables was conducted in Taiwan and compared to an existing U.S. sample. Across the two national cultures, individual perceptions of corporate ethics appears to be a more direct determinant of organizational commitment than individual moral values. Differences between the two national cultures were found in ethics perception as it relates to moral values, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Explanations for the differences are discussed.
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  42.  61
    Bullying in the U.S. Workplace: Normative and Process-Oriented Ethical Approaches.Helen LaVan & Wm Marty Martin - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):147-165.
    Bullying is a serious problem in today’s workplace, in that, a large percentage of employees have either been bullied or knows someone who has. There are a variety of ethical concerns dealing with bullying—that is, courses of action to manage the bullying contain serious ethical/legal concerns. The inadequacies of legal protections for bullying in the U.S. workplace also compound the approaches available to deal ethically with bullying. While Schumann (2001, Human Resource Management Review 11, 93–111) does not explicitly examine bullying, (...)
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  43.  24
    U.S. Complicity and Japan's Wartime Medical Atrocities: Time for a Response.Katrien Devolder - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (6):40-49.
    Shortly before and during the Second World War, Japanese doctors and medical researchers conducted large-scale human experiments in occupied China that were at least as gruesome as those conducted by Nazi doctors. Japan never officially acknowledged the occurrence of the experiments, never tried any of the perpetrators, and never provided compensation to the victims or issued an apology. Building on work by Jing-Bao Nie, this article argues that the U.S. government is heavily complicit in this grave injustice, and should respond (...)
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  44.  17
    Ecological Effects in Cross‐Cultural Differences Between U.S. And Japanese Color Preferences.Kazuhiko Yokosawa, Karen B. Schloss, Michiko Asano & Stephen E. Palmer - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (7):1590-1616.
    We investigated cultural differences between U.S. and Japanese color preferences and the ecological factors that might influence them. Japanese and U.S. color preferences have both similarities and differences. Complex gender differences were also evident that did not conform to previously reported effects. Palmer and Schloss's weighted affective valence estimate procedure was used to test the Ecological Valence Theory's prediction that within-culture WAVE-preference correlations should be higher than between-culture WAVE-preference correlations. The results supported several, but not all, predictions. In the second (...)
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  45.  11
    U.S. Responses To Japanese Wartime Inhuman Experimentation After World War Ii: National Security and Wartime Exigency.Howard Brody, Sarah E. Leonard, Jing-bao Nie & Paul Weindling - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):220-230.
    In 1945–46, representatives of the U.S. government made similar discoveries in both Germany and Japan, unearthing evidence of unethical experiments on human beings that could be viewed as war crimes. The outcomes in the two defeated nations, however, were strikingly different. In Germany, the United States, influenced by the Canadian physician John Thompson, played a key role in bringing Nazi physicians to trial and publicizing their misdeeds. In Japan, the United States played an equally key role in concealing information about (...)
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  46.  47
    Truth, Consequences and Culture: A Comparative Examination of Cheating and Attitudes About Cheating Among U.S. And U.K. Students. [REVIEW]Stephen B. Salter, Daryl M. Guffey & Jeffrey J. McMillan - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):37-50.
    As Post observes, accounting firms are unique among multinationals. They are more likely than firms in almost any other category to go abroad. They also have less choice in location as their expansion is determined largely by the desired locations of their clients. Given the widespread global presence of such firms, it can be argued that the global audit firm is uniquely at risk from variations in ethical perceptions across nations. This study extends the U.S. accounting literature on determinants of (...)
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  47.  15
    Touching the Base: Heart-Warming Ads From the 2016 U.S. Election Moved Viewers to Partisan Tears.Beate Seibt, Thomas W. Schubert, Janis H. Zickfeld & Alan P. Fiske - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (2):197-212.
    ABSTRACTSome political ads used in the 2016 U.S. election evoked feelings colloquially known as being moved to tears. We conceptualise this phenomenon as a positive social emotion that appraises and motivates communal relations, is accompanied by physical sensations, and often labelled metaphorically. We surveyed U.S. voters in the fortnight before the 2016 U.S. election. Selected ads evoked the emotion completely and reliably, but in a partisan fashion: Clinton voters were moved to tears by three selected Clinton ads, and Trump voters (...)
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  48.  18
    Why Did U.S. Healthcare Professionals Become Involved in Torture During the War on Terror?Myles Balfe - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (3):449-460.
    This article examines why U.S. healthcare professionals became involved in “enhanced interrogation,” or torture, during the War on Terror. A number of factors are identified including a desire on the part of these professionals to defend their country and fellow citizens from future attack; having their activities approved and authorized by legitimate command structures; financial incentives; and wanting to prevent serious harm from occurring to prisoners/detainees. The factors outlined here suggest that psychosocial factors can influence health professionals’ ethical decision-making.
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  49.  2
    Does Religiosity Matter to Value Relevance? Evidence From U.S. Banking Firms.Lamia Chourou - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    This study examines whether religiosity is associated with the valuation multiples investors assign to fair-valued assets that are susceptible to managerial bias. Using a sample of U.S. banking firms, I find that the value relevance of such assets is higher for firms located in more religious counties than it is for firms located in less religious counties. Moreover, I find that this result is more consistent with the ethicality trait than the risk aversion trait of more religious individuals. Additional tests (...)
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  50.  30
    Consumer Ethics: The Role of Acculturation in U.S. Immigrant Populations.Ziad Swaidan, Scott J. Vitell, Gregory M. Rose & Faye W. Gilbert - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):1-16.
    This study examines the role of acculturation in shaping consumers’ views of ethics. Specifically, it examines the relationships between the desire to keep one’s original culture, the desire to adopt the host culture, and the four dimensions of the Muncy and Vitell (Journal of Business Research Ethics 24(4), 297, 1992) consumer ethics scale. Using two separate immigrant populations – one of former Middle-Eastern residents now living in the U.S. and the other of Asian immigrants in the U.S. – results indicate (...)
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