Results for 'Ulrike Oudee D��nkelsb��hler'

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  1.  81
    Kongreß Im Kasseler Kulturbahnhof: Konfigurationen. Zwischen Kunst Und Medien (4.-7.9.97).Ulrike Oudée Dünkelsbühler - 1998 - Die Philosophin 9 (17):102-106.
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  2.  13
    Kongreß im Kasseler Kulturbahnhof: Konfigurationen. Zwischen Kunst und Medien (4.-7.9.97).Ulrike Oudée Dünkelsbühler - 1998 - Die Philosophin 9 (17):102-106.
  3.  15
    Aristotle, On Poetics1 Eds., and Trans., Seth Benardete And.Michael Davis, Claudia Baracchi, Duane H. Davis, Ulrike Oudee Dünkelsbühler, Stephen Gaukroger & Eugene Gogol - 2001 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 23 (1).
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  4.  3
    Language Origins Viewed in Spontaneous and Interactive Vocal Rates of Human and Bonobo Infants.D. Kimbrough Oller, Ulrike Griebel, Suneeti Nathani Iyer, Yuna Jhang, Anne S. Warlaumont, Rick Dale & Josep Call - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    From the first months of life, human infants produce “protophones,” speech-like, non-cry sounds, presumed absent, or only minimally present in other apes. But there have been no direct quantitative comparisons to support this presumption. In addition, by 2 months, human infants show sustained face-to-face interaction using protophones, a pattern thought also absent or very limited in other apes, but again, without quantitative comparison. Such comparison should provide evidence relevant to determining foundations of language, since substantially flexible vocalization, the inclination to (...)
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  5.  48
    Vocal Development as a Guide to Modeling the Evolution of Language.D. Kimbrough Oller, Ulrike Griebel & Anne S. Warlaumont - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):382-392.
    Modeling of evolution and development of language has principally utilized mature units of spoken language, phonemes and words, as both targets and inputs. This approach cannot address the earliest phases of development because young infants are unable to produce such language features. We argue that units of early vocal development—protophones and their primitive illocutionary/perlocutionary forces—should be targeted in evolutionary modeling because they suggest likely units of hominin vocalization/communication shortly after the split from the chimpanzee/bonobo lineage, and because early development of (...)
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  6.  14
    Depression and Rumination: Relation to Components of Inhibition.Ulrike Zetsche, Catherine D'Avanzato & Jutta Joormann - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (4):758-767.
  7.  33
    Developmental Plasticity and Language: A Comparative Perspective.Ulrike Griebel, Irene M. Pepperberg & D. Kimbrough Oller - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):435-445.
    The growing field of evo-devo is increasingly demonstrating the complexity of steps involved in genetic, intracellular regulatory, and extracellular environmental control of the development of phenotypes. A key result of such work is an account for the remarkable plasticity of organismal form in many species based on relatively minor changes in regulation of highly conserved genes and genetic processes. Accounting for behavioral plasticity is of similar potential interest but has received far less attention. Of particular interest is plasticity in communication (...)
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  8.  14
    On Quantitative Comparative Research in Communication and Language Evolution.D. Kimbrough Oller & Ulrike Griebel - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (3):296-308.
    Quantitative comparison of human language and natural animal communication requires improved conceptualizations. We argue that an infrastructural approach to development and evolution incorporating an extended interpretation of the distinctions among illocution, perlocution, and meaning can help place the issues relevant to quantitative comparison in perspective. The approach can illuminate the controversy revolving around the notion of functional referentiality as applied to alarm calls, for example in the vervet monkey. We argue that referentiality offers a poor point of quantitative comparison across (...)
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  9.  25
    How the Language Capacity Was Naturally Selected: Altriciality and Long Immaturity.D. Kimbrough Oller & Ulrike Griebel - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):293-294.
    Critical factors that appear to encourage vocal development in humans are altriciality and long immaturity. Hominid infants appear to have evolved a specific tendency to use elaborate vocalization as a means of soliciting long-term investment from caregivers. The development of such vocal capacity provides necessary infrastructure for language development across human life history.
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  10.  11
    Who “Believes” in the Gambler’s Fallacy and Why?George D. Farmer, Paul A. Warren & Ulrike Hahn - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 146 (1):63-76.
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  11.  1
    Functionally Flexible Signaling and the Origin of Language.D. Kimbrough Oller & Ulrike Griebel - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    At the earliest break of ancient hominins from their primate relatives in vocal communication, we propose a selection pressure on vocal fitness signaling by hominin infants. Exploratory vocalizations, not tied to expression of distress or immediate need, could have helped persuade parents of the wellness and viability of the infants who produced them. We hypothesize that hominin parents invested more in infants who produced such signals of fitness plentifully, neglecting or abandoning them less often than infants who produced the sounds (...)
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  12.  13
    Language Origins Viewed in Spontaneous and Interactive Vocal Rates of Human and Bonobo Infants.D. Kimbrough Oller, Ulrike Griebel, N. Suneeti, Yuna Jhang, Anne S. Warlaumont, Rick Dale & Chris Callaway - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    From the first months of life, human infants produce “protophones,” speech-like, non-cry sounds, presumed absent, or only minimally present in other apes. But there have been no direct quantitative comparisons to support this presumption. In addition, by 2 months, human infants show sustained face-to-face interaction using protophones, a pattern thought also absent or very limited in other apes, but again, without quantitative comparison. Such comparison should provide evidence relevant to determining foundations of language, since substantially flexible vocalization, the inclination to (...)
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  13.  34
    New Frontiers in Language Evolution and Development.D. Kimbrough Oller, Rick Dale & Ulrike Griebel - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):353-360.
    This article introduces the Special Issue and its focus on research in language evolution with emphasis on theory as well as computational and robotic modeling. A key theme is based on the growth of evolutionary developmental biology or evo-devo. The Special Issue consists of 13 articles organized in two sections: A) Theoretical foundations and B) Modeling and simulation studies. All the papers are interdisciplinary in nature, encompassing work in biological and linguistic foundations for the study of language evolution as well (...)
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  14.  13
    Liberating the Cena.Ulrike Roth - 2016 - Classical Quarterly 66 (2):614-634.
    That the extraordinary narrative experiment known as theSatyriconhas regularly stimulated scholarly investigation into the relationship between status and freedom is not surprising for a work, the longest surviving section of which features an excessive dinner party at the house of alibertus. Much of the discussion has concentrated on the depiction of the dinner's host and his freedmen friends. Following the lead of F. Zeitlin and others in seeing the depiction of a ‘freedmen's milieu’ in theCena, J. Bodel argued in a (...)
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  15.  2
    An Investigation of Neurochemical Changes in Chronic Cannabis Users.Sharlene D. Newman, Hu Cheng, Ashley Schnakenberg Martin, Ulrike Dydak, Shalmali Dharmadhikari, William Hetrick & Brian O’Donnell - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  16.  4
    Dependencies in Evidential Reports: The Case for Informational Advantages.Toby D. Pilditch, Ulrike Hahn, Norman Fenton & David Lagnado - 2020 - Cognition 204:104343.
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  17.  43
    Walter Bower, Scotichronicon, 7: Books XIII and XIV, Ed. And Trans. A. B. Scott and D. E. R. Watt, with Ulrike Morét and Norman F. Shead. Edinburgh: Mercat Press, for Aberdeen University Press, 1996. Pp. Xxx, 557; Diagrams. £35.Victoria Chandler - 1998 - Speculum 73 (2):476-476.
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  18.  10
    Michaela HOHKAMP, Herrschaft in der Herrschaft . Die vorderösterreichische Obervogtei Triberg von 1737 bis 1780), Göttingen, Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1998. [REVIEW]Ulrike Krample - 2002 - Clio 16:318-320.
    Dans son étude sur le petit domaine de Triberg dépendant de la province habsbourgeoise de Vorderösterreich, situé dans le sud-ouest de l'Allemagne actuelle, l'historienne allemande Michaela Hohkamp, assistante à la Freie Universtität de Berlin, s'interroge sur le mouvement de centralisation de l'État que l'on a coutume d'observer à cette époque dans l'Europe entière. En dépit de son relatif isolement géographique au cœur de la Forêt Noire, Triberg, est toutefois touché par les vastes t..
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  19.  11
    Du Caritatif au Politique, L’Itinéraire de Jeanne Koehler-Lumière.Bernadette Angleraud - 2006 - Clio 24:195-210.
    L’itinéraire de Jeanne Kœhler-Lumière l’a conduite de la philanthropie à la collaboration avec les pouvoirs publics pour la réalisation d’une politique sociale à Lyon après la Première Guerre mondiale. Fille et sœur d’industriels, elle participe aux œuvres mises en place pour le personnel de l’usine familiale, puis élargit son action en faveur de l’enfance à l’échelle de la ville. Cependant, l’ancrage de la famille Lumière dans le camp de la République laïque isole Jeanne Kœhler-Lumière des milieux traditionnels de la philanthropie (...)
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  20.  3
    Ulrike Strate-Schneider: Einmischen - Mitmischen. Beiträge der Arbeitsstelle Sozial-, Kultur- und Erziehungswissenschaftliche Frauenforschung. TU Berlin 1980 bis 1992.Ulrike Ramming - 1994 - Die Philosophin 5 (10):113-114.
  21.  19
    Ulrike Strate-Schneider: Einmischen - Mitmischen. Beiträge der Arbeitsstelle Sozial-, Kultur- Und Erziehungswissenschaftliche Frauenforschung. TU Berlin 1980 Bis 1992.Ulrike Ramming - 1994 - Die Philosophin 5 (10):113-114.
  22. Machineries for Making Publics: Inscribing and De-Scribing Publics in Public Engagement.Ulrike Felt & Maximilian Fochler - 2010 - Minerva 48 (3):219-238.
    This paper investigates the dynamic and performative construction of publics in public engagement exercises. In this investigation, we, on the one hand, analyse how public engagement settings as political machineries frame particular kinds of roles and identities for the participating publics in relation to ‘the public at large’. On the other hand, we study how the participating citizens appropriate, resist and transform these roles and identities, and how they construct themselves and the participating group in relation to wider publics. The (...)
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  23. The Paradox of Deontology, Revisited.Ulrike Heuer - 2011 - In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  24.  37
    A Difference in Kind? Jürgen Habermas and Charles Taylor on Post-Secularism.Ulrike Spohn - 2015 - The European Legacy 20 (2):120-135.
    In this essay I examine the debate between Jürgen Habermas and Charles Taylor on the post-secular state. I argue that, although their views on the relation of religion and politics converge in certain respects, a profound difference remains between their overall approaches. Their disagreement on the epistemic status of religious as opposed to secular moral reasons, and on the role religious arguments can play in the public sphere testify to a deeper schism. Thus what might at first seem like a (...)
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  25.  18
    Truth tracking performance of social networks: how connectivity and clustering can make groups less competent.Ulrike Hahn, Jens Ulrik Hansen & Erik J. Olsson - 2020 - Synthese 197 (4):1511-1541.
    Our beliefs and opinions are shaped by others, making our social networks crucial in determining what we believe to be true. Sometimes this is for the good because our peers help us form a more accurate opinion. Sometimes it is for the worse because we are led astray. In this context, we address via agent-based computer simulations the extent to which patterns of connectivity within our social networks affect the likelihood that initially undecided agents in a network converge on a (...)
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  26.  10
    The Value of Doubt: Humanities-Based Literacy in Management Education.Ulrike Landfester & Jörg Metelmann - 2020 - Humanistic Management Journal 5 (2):159-175.
    Our paper addresses the question of what exactly the contribution of the humanities to management education could or should be, suggesting the concept of Literacy as both this contribution’s goal and method. Though there seems to emerge a consensus in the debate about the future of management education that the humanities should be involved with shaping it, some misconceptions about the humanities obscure the understanding of the why and how of it, most notably as to the manner in which they (...)
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  27. Abortion and Moral Risk1: D. Moller.D. Moller - 2011 - Philosophy 86 (3):425-443.
    It is natural for those with permissive attitudes toward abortion to suppose that, if they have examined all of the arguments they know against abortion and have concluded that they fail, their moral deliberations are at an end. Surprisingly, this is not the case, as I argue. This is because the mere risk that one of those arguments succeeds can generate a moral reason that counts against the act. If this is so, then liberals may be mistaken about the morality (...)
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  28.  94
    Normative Theories of Argumentation: Are Some Norms Better Than Others?Adam Corner & Ulrike Hahn - 2013 - Synthese 190 (16):3579-3610.
    Norms—that is, specifications of what we ought to do—play a critical role in the study of informal argumentation, as they do in studies of judgment, decision-making and reasoning more generally. Specifically, they guide a recurring theme: are people rational? Though rules and standards have been central to the study of reasoning, and behavior more generally, there has been little discussion within psychology about why (or indeed if) they should be considered normative despite the considerable philosophical literature that bears on this (...)
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  29.  97
    Correction to John D. Norton “How to Build an Infinite Lottery Machine”.John D. Norton & Alexander R. Pruss - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (1):143-144.
    An infinite lottery machine is used as a foil for testing the reach of inductive inference, since inferences concerning it require novel extensions of probability. Its use is defensible if there is some sense in which the lottery is physically possible, even if exotic physics is needed. I argue that exotic physics is needed and describe several proposals that fail and at least one that succeeds well enough.
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  30. Reasons and Impossibility.Ulrike Heuer - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 147 (2):235 - 246.
    In this paper, I argue that a person can have a reason to do what she cannot do. In a nutshell, the argument is that a person can have derivate reasons relating to an action that she has a non-derivative reason to perform. There are clear examples of derivative reasons that a person has in cases where she cannot do what she (non-derivatively) has reason to do. She couldn’t have those derivative reasons, unless she also had the non-derivative reason to (...)
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  31. Reasons for Actions and Desires.Ulrike Heuer - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 121 (1):43–63.
    It is an assumption common to many theories of rationality that all practical reasons are based on a person's given desires. I shall call any approach to practical reasons which accepts this assumption a "Humean approach". In spite of many criticisms, the Humean approach has numerous followers who take it to be the natural and inevitable view of practical reason. I will develop an argument against the Humean view aiming to explain its appeal, as well as to expose its mistake. (...)
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  32.  6
    D. E. Hughes Self-Induction and the Skin-Effect.D. W. Jordan - 1982 - Centaurus 26 (2):123-153.
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  33.  6
    Negotiating the Reuse of Health-Data: Research, Big Data, and the European General Data Protection Regulation.Ulrike Felt & Johannes Starkbaum - 2019 - Big Data and Society 6 (2).
    Before the EU General Data Protection Regulation entered into force in May 2018, we witnessed an intense struggle of actors associated with data-dependent fields of science, in particular health-related academia and biobanks striving for legal derogations for data reuse in research. These actors engaged in a similar line of argument and formed issue alliances to pool their collective power. Using descriptive coding followed by an interpretive analysis, this article investigates the argumentative repertoire of these actors and embeds the analysis in (...)
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  34.  19
    A Logic for Diffusion in Social Networks.Zoé Christoff & Jens Ulrik Hansen - 2015 - Journal of Applied Logic 13 (1):48-77.
    This paper introduces a general logical framework for reasoning about diffusion processes within social networks. The new “Logic for Diffusion in Social Networks” is a dynamic extension of standard hybrid logic, allowing to model complex phenomena involving several properties of agents. We provide a complete axiomatization and a terminating and complete tableau system for this logic and show how to apply the framework to diffusion phenomena documented in social networks analysis.
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  35.  66
    Intentions and the Reasons for Which We Act.Ulrike Heuer - 2014 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 114 (3pt3):291-315.
    Many of the things we do in the course of a day we don't do intentionally: blushing, sneezing, breathing, blinking, smiling—to name but a few. But we also do act intentionally, and often when we do we act for reasons. Whether we always act for reasons when we act intentionally is controversial. But at least the converse is generally accepted: when we act for reasons we always act intentionally. Necessarily, it seems. In this paper, I argue that acting intentionally is (...)
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  36.  10
    Subsequent Pregnancy Affects Morbidity of Previous Child.Erik Bøhler & Staffan Bergström - 1995 - Journal of Biosocial Science 27 (4):431-442.
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  37.  38
    $\mathfrak{D}$ -Differentiation in Hilbert Space and the Structure of Quantum Mechanics.D. J. Hurley & M. A. Vandyck - 2009 - Foundations of Physics 39 (5):433-473.
    An appropriate kind of curved Hilbert space is developed in such a manner that it admits operators of $\mathcal{C}$ - and $\mathfrak{D}$ -differentiation, which are the analogues of the familiar covariant and D-differentiation available in a manifold. These tools are then employed to shed light on the space-time structure of Quantum Mechanics, from the points of view of the Feynman ‘path integral’ and of canonical quantisation. (The latter contains, as a special case, quantisation in arbitrary curvilinear coordinates when space is (...)
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  38.  30
    Infima in the D.R.E. Degrees.D. Kaddah - 1993 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 62 (3):207-263.
    This paper analyzes several properties of infima in Dn, the n-r.e. degrees. We first show that, for every n> 1, there are n-r.e. degrees a, b, and c, and an -r.e. degree x such that a < x < b, c and, in Dn, b c = a. We also prove a related result, namely that there are two d.r.e. degrees that form a minimal pair in Dn, for each n < ω, but that do not form a minimal pair (...)
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  39. Wrongness and Reasons.Ulrike Heuer - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):137 - 152.
    Is the wrongness of an action a reason not to perform it? Of course it is, you may answer. That an action is wrong both explains and justifies not doing it. Yet, there are doubts. Thinking that wrongness is a reason is confused, so an argument by Jonathan Dancy. There can’t be such a reason if ‘ϕ-ing is wrong’ is verdictive, and an all things considered judgment about what (not) to do in a certain situation. Such judgments are based on (...)
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  40.  41
    Explaining Reasons: Where Does the Buck Stop?Ulrike Heuer - 2005 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 1 (3):1-25.
    The buck-passing account of values offers an explanation of the close relation of values and reasons for action: of why it is that the question whether something that is of value provides reasons is not ”open.” Being of value simply is, its defenders claim, a property that something has in virtue of its having other reason-providing properties. The generic idea of buck-passing is that the property of being good or being of value does not provide reasons. It is other properties (...)
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  41.  80
    Beyond Wrong Reasons: The Buck-Passing Account of Value.Ulrike Heuer - 2010 - In Michael Brady (ed.), New Waves in Metaethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  42.  45
    The Reduction of Society: D. H. Mellor.D. H. Mellor - 1982 - Philosophy 57 (219):51-75.
    How does the study of society relate to the study of the people it comprises? This longstanding question is partly one of method, but mainly one of fact, of how independent the objects of these two studies, societies and people, are. It is commonly put as a question of reduction, and I shall tackle it in that form: does sociology reduce in principle to individual psychology? I follow custom in calling the claim that it does ‘individualism’ and its denial ‘holism’.
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  43.  82
    $\mathfrak{D}$ -Differentiation in Hilbert Space and the Structure of Quantum Mechanics Part II: Accelerated Observers and Fictitious Forces. [REVIEW]D. J. Hurley & M. A. Vandyck - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (4):667-685.
    We investigate a possible form of Schrödinger’s equation as it appears to moving observers. It is shown that, in this framework, accelerated motion requires fictitious potentials to be added to the original equation. The gauge invariance of the formulation is established. The example of accelerated Euclidean transformations is treated explicitly, which contain Galilean transformations as special cases. The relationship between an acceleration and a gravitational field is found to be compatible with the picture of the ‘Einstein elevator’. The physical effects (...)
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  44.  7
    Oral Communication in Individuals with Hearing Impairment—Considerations Regarding Attentional, Cognitive and Social Resources.Ulrike Lemke & Sigrid Scherpiet - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  45.  80
    Luck, Value, and Commitment: Themes From the Ethics of Bernard Williams.Ulrike Heuer & Gerald Lang (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Luck, Value, and Commitment comprises eleven new essays which engage with, or take their point of departure from, the influential work in moral and political philosophy of Bernard Williams (1929-2003).
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  46.  58
    Transcendental Tense: D.H. Mellor.D. H. Mellor - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):29–44.
    [D. H. Mellor] Kant's claim that our knowledge of time is transcendental in his sense, while false of time itself, is true of tenses, i.e. of the locations of events and other temporal entities in McTaggart's A series. This fact can easily, and I think only, be explained by taking time itself to be real but tenseless. /// [J. R. Lucas] Mellor's argument from Kant fails. The difficulties in his first Antinomy are due to topological confusions, not the tensed nature (...)
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  47.  43
    Human Dignity, and the Transformation of Moral Rights Into Legal Rights.Hans Jörg Sandkühler - 2010 - Iris. European Journal of Philosophy and Public Debate 2 (4):349-362.
    “Human dignity is inviolable. It must be respected and protected.” What is the status of this proposition? Is human dignity inviolable? Statements on human dignity are closely intertwined with philosophical, anthropological and legal issues – and with the obligations, possibilities and limits of philosophy. Why a plea for human dignity? There are two reasons at least: (i) human dignity is violated, (ii) there are heated debates on exactly what “human dignity“ means. Accordingly, the elements of a normative theory of the (...)
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  48.  61
    Plato's Theory of Ideas. By D. Ross. Pp. 251. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1951. 18s.D. Tarrant, D. Ross & Plato - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73 (1):156-157.
  49.  23
    Micro-Composition1: D. H. Mellor.D. H. Mellor - 2008 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 62:65-80.
    Entities of many kinds, not just material things, have been credited with parts. Armstrong, for example, has taken propositions and properties to be parts of their conjunctions, sets to be parts of sets that include them, and geographical regions and events to be parts of regions and events that contain them. The justification for bringing all these diverse relations under a single ‘part–whole’ concept is that they share all or most of the formal features articulated in mereology. But the concept (...)
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  50.  24
    Aristotle on Dialectic: D. W. Hamlyn.D. W. Hamlyn - 1990 - Philosophy 65 (254):465-476.
    There have in recent years been at least two important attempts to get to grips with Aristotle's conception of dialectic. I have in mind those by Martha C. Nussbaum in ‘Saving Aristotle's appearances’, which is chapter 8 of her The Fragility of Goodness , and by Terence H. Irwin in his important, though in my opinion somewhat misguided, book Aristotle's First Principles . There is a sense in which both of these writers are reacting to the work of G. E. (...)
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