Results for 'Universidad Rosario Business School Submittedelr'

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  1. Academic Goals, Student Homework Engagement, and Academic Achievement in Elementary School.Antonio Valle, Bibiana Regueiro, José C. Núñez, Susana Rodríguez, Isabel Piñeiro & Pedro Rosário - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  2.  8
    Reorienting the Business School Agenda: The Case for Relevance, Rigor, and Righteousness.Andreas Birnik & Jon Billsberry - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):985-999.
    This article contributes to the current debate regarding management education and research. It frames the current business school critique as a paradox regarding the arguments for ‘self-interest’ versus ‘altruism’ as human motives. Based on this, a typology of management with four representative types labeled: unguided, altruistic, egoistic, and righteous is developed. It is proposed that the path to the future of management education and research might be found by relegitimizing the ‘altruistic’ spirit of the classics of the great (...)
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    Ethics for School Business Officials.William T. Hartman - 2005 - Scarecroweducation.
    Ethics and school business officials -- Making ethical decisions -- Ethics for school business officials -- Examining personal and professional codes of ethics -- Approaching ethical dilemmas -- Human resource management -- Financial resource management -- Facility, property, and information management -- Ancillary services : transportation.
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  4.  32
    Cheating During the College Years: How Do Business School Students Compare?Helen A. Klein, Nancy M. Levenburg, Marie McKendall & William Mothersell - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (2):197-206.
    When it comes to cheating in higher education, business school students have often been accused of being the worst offenders; if true, this may be a contributing factor in the kinds of fraud that have plagued the business community in recent years. We examined the issue of cheating in the business school by surveying 268 students in business and other professional schools on their attitudes about, and experiences with, cheating. We found that while (...) school students actually cheated no more or less than students in other professional schools, their attitudes on what constitutes cheating are more lax than those of other professional school students. Additionally, we found that serious cheaters across all professional schools were more likely to be younger and have a lower grade point average. (shrink)
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  5.  16
    The Ethics Narrative and the Role of the Business School in Moral Development.Robert A. Miller - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):287 - 293.
    Media stories of ethical lapses in business are relentless. The general public vacillates between revulsion, impatience, cynicism, and apathy. The role of the Business School in Moral Development is debated by scholars, accrediting agencies, and Schools of Businesses. It is a question to which there is no easy answer and one with which Business Schools continue to grapple. This article places the concept of "moral imagination," theories of moral development, and ethics in a behavioral context. It (...)
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  6.  17
    Exploring Business School Ethics.Johannes Brinkmann & Ken Peattie - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):151-169.
    There is much more written about how and why business schools could and should talk about business ethics than about how they could “walk the talk.” When ethics is discussed, it is usually in relation to the position of business ethics within the curriculum, rather than about what does and does not constitute ethical behaviour on the part of a business school and its members. This paper seeks to explore how ethics can develop beyond the (...)
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  7.  7
    Selected Ethical Issues in the Analysis and Reporting of Research: Survey of Business School Faculty in Malaysia. [REVIEW]June Poon & Raja Ainuddin - 2011 - Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (4):307-322.
    This study reports the perceptions of business school faculty on ethical behaviors related to data analysis and research reporting as well as the prevalence of such behaviors in their academic environment. Survey data for the study were obtained from a sample of 102 business school faculty from five government-funded universities in Malaysia. Study results showed that a majority of the respondents considered practices such as fabrication, manipulation, and distortion of data to be ethically unacceptable, and these (...)
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  8.  23
    Meta-Learning About Business Ethics: Building Honorable Business School Communities. [REVIEW]Linda Klebe Trevino & Donald McCabe - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (6):405 - 416.
    We propose extending business ethics education beyond the formal curriculum to the hidden curriculum where messages about ethics and values are implicitly sent and received. In this meta-learning approach, students learn by becoming active participants in an honorable business school community where real ethical issues are openly discussed and acted upon. When combined with formal ethics instruction, this meta-learning approach provides a framework for a proposed comprehensive program of business ethics education.
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  9.  15
    The Global Citizenship MBA Orientation Program: Action Learning at the University of Michigan Business School[REVIEW]Graham I. Mercer - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (1):111 - 120.
    The University of Michigan Business School's Global Citizenship Program is a two day action learning model conducted during orientation week. During these two days, teams of students, faculty and staff, along with corporate managers, work side-by-side on community projects. These projects are intended to help students understand the difficult issues and frustrations faced by community organizations. The students have opportunities throughout the year to continue to volunteer their business skills and time.
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  10.  28
    Ethical Values and Leadership: A Study of Business School Deans in Canada.Nick Bontis & Adwoa Mould-Mograbi - 2006 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 2 (s 3-4):217-236.
    Ethical leadership in any organisation is expected to come from the top. With business leaders taking a real stand on ethics, it is imperative that business schools instil strong values into their students. Deans of business schools must exhibit these ethical values to provide an example for faculty, students and staff to emulate. This study is an investigation of the ethical values of deans and associate deans in ten business schools in Canada. The results portray the (...)
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  11.  20
    Integrating Ethics Into the Business School Curriculum.Thomas W. Dunfee & Diana C. Robertson - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):847 - 859.
    A project on teaching business ethics at The Wharton School concluded that ethics should be directly incorporated into key MBA courses and taught by the core business faculty. The project team, comprised of students, ethics faculty and functional business faculty, designed a model program for integrating ethics. The project was funded by the Exxon Education Foundation.The program originates with a general introduction designed to familiarize students with literature and concepts pertaining to professional and business ethics (...)
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  12.  28
    A Longitudinal Survey of Business School Graduates' Assessments of Business Ethics.Peter Arlow & Thomas A. Ulrich - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (4):295 - 302.
    A longitudinal survey of business graduates over a four-year period revealed stability over time in their assessments of proposals to improve business ethics except for significantly greater disapproval of government regulation. A comparison of graduates and executives indicate both favor developing general ethical business principles, business ethics courses, and codes of ethics, while disapproving government regulation and participation by religious leaders in ethical norms for business. The mean rankings by business graduates over time of (...)
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  13.  13
    Early Business Ethics in Spain: The Salamanca School (1526--1614). [REVIEW]Domènec Melé - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 22 (3):175 - 189.
    Business ethics is not a novelty: it has important antecedents, among which we find the Spanish "Salamanca School". Its most brilliant period was during the sixteenth and early seventeenth century, a historical epoch when Spain was one of the principal centers of commerce in Europe. In this article, we present a panoramic view of business ethics as developed by this school and discuss its potential contributions to new developments in business ethics. The Salamanca School (...)
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  14.  9
    The Effects of Professional Education on Values and the Resolution of Ethical Dilemmas: Business School Vs. Law School Students. [REVIEW]Donald L. McCabe, Janet M. Dukerich & Jane E. Dutton - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (9):693-700.
    Prior research on the impact of ethics education within the business curriculum has yielded mixed results. Although the impact is often found to be positive, it appears to be both small and short-lived. Interpretation of these results, however, is subject to important methodological limitations. The present research employed a longitudinal methodology to evaluate the impact of an M.B.A. program versus a law program on the values and ethical decision making behavior of a cohort of students at two major universities (...)
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  15.  17
    Business Ethics and the History of Economics in Spain "the School of Salamanca: A Bibliography". [REVIEW]León Gómez Rivas - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 22 (3):191 - 202.
    The name "School of Salamanca" refers to a group of theologians and natural law philosophers who taught in the University of Salamanca, following the inspiration of the great Thomist Francisco de Vitoria. It turns out that the Scholastics were not simply medieval, but began in the 13th century and expanded through the 16th and 17th centuries; and they developed some original theories about economics and international law.Why should a few men mainly interested in theology and ethics apply themselves in (...)
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  16. Put an Ethicist on the Team!: A Promising But Neglected “Third Way” to Teach Ethics in a Business School.Wayne Norman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):257-273.
    How can business schools best prepare their students to deal with the ethical challenges they will face in the ‘real world’? For three or four decades members of business schools have debated the relative merits of teaching ethics in a stand-alone “foundational” course or teaching a little bit of ethics “across the curriculum” in every course. This paper explores a third option—having an ethicist as a member of a team that teaches an integrated approach to management—which combines the (...)
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  17.  25
    Ethical Misconduct in the Business School: A Case of Plagiarism That Turned Bitter. [REVIEW]Carlos Cabral-Cardoso - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):75-89.
    As a result of the public demand for higher ethical standards, business schools are increasingly taking ethical matters seriously. But their effort has concentrated on teaching business ethics and on students' ethical behavior. Business faculty, in contrast, has attracted much less attention. This paper explores the context and the implications of an alleged case of plagiarism in a master's dissertation submitted to a university lacking both an ethical code of conduct and a formalized procedure to deal with (...)
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  18.  35
    Research Ethics in a Business School Context: The Establishment of a Review Committee and the Primary Issues of Concern. [REVIEW]Michelle Cunningham - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (1):43-66.
    This paper describes the establishment of and the issues experienced by the Research Ethics Committee (REC) of a Business School within a University in Ireland. It identifies the issue of voluntarily given informed consent as a key challenge for RECs operating in a Business School context. The paper argues that whilst the typology of ethical issues in business research are similar to the wider social sciences, the fact that much research is carried out in the (...)
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  19.  3
    Developing Students’ Competence for Ethical Reflection While Attending Business School.Heidi von Weltzien Hoivik - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):5-9.
    Business students early on should be offered a course presenting and analyzing ethical dilemmas they will face as human beings both in the business world and in society. However, such a course should use literature, plays, and novels to illustrate ethical norms and values in the intertwined relationships of human activities. Better than business case studies, literature offers portraits of characters as leaders, employees, consultants, and other professionals, as ordinary human beings with conflicting desires, drives, and ambitions. (...)
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  20.  3
    Developing Students' Competence for Ethical Reflection While Attending Business School.Hoivik Heidi von Weltzien - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):5 - 9.
    Business students early on should be offered a course presenting and analyzing ethical dilemmas they will face as human beings both in the business world and in society. However, such a course should use literature, plays, and novels to illustrate ethical norms and values in the intertwined relationships of human activities. Better than business case studies, literature offers portraits of characters as leaders, employees, consultants, and other professionals, as ordinary human beings with conflicting desires, drives, and ambitions. (...)
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  21.  18
    Context, Values and Moral Dilemmas: Comparing the Choices of Business and Law School Students. [REVIEW]Donald L. McCabe, Janet M. Dukerich & Jane E. Dutton - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (12):951 - 960.
    Much has been written about the ethics and values of today's business student, but this research has generally been characterized by a variety of methodological shortcomings — the use of convenience samples, a failure to establish the relevance of comparison groups employed, attempts to understand behavior in terms of unidimensional values preselected by the researcher, and the lack of well-designed longitudinal studies. The research reported here addresses many of these concerns by comparing the values and ethical decision making behavior (...)
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  22.  28
    “Greed is Good” ... Or is It? Economic Ideology and Moral Tension in a Graduate School of Business.Janet S. Walker - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):273 - 283.
    This article reports the results of an exploratory investigation of a particular area of moral tension experienced by MBA students in a graduate school of business. During the first phase of the study, MBA students'' own perceptions about the moral climate and culture of the business school were examined. The data gathered in this first part of the study indicate that the students recognize that a central part of this culture is constituted by a shared familiarity (...)
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  23.  15
    The Influence of Business School’s Ethical Climate on Students’ Unethical Behavior.Thomas A. Birtch & Flora F. T. Chiang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):283-294.
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  24.  8
    Academic Honesty in the Business School.Jay A. Halfond - 1991 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 10 (3):101-106.
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  25.  5
    The Status of Ethics Courses in the Business School Curriculum.Wang Xingchao - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 5:267-270.
  26.  20
    Increasing Applied Business Ethics Courses in Business School Curricula.Ronald R. Sims & Serbrenia J. Sims - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (3):211 - 219.
    Business schools have a responsibility to incorporate applied business ethics courses as part of their undergraduate and MBA curriculum. The purpose of this article is to take a background and historical look at reasons for the new emphasis on ethical coursework in business schools. The article suggests a prescription for undergraduate and graduate education in applied business ethics and explores in detail the need to increase applied business ethics courses in business schools to enhance (...)
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  27.  16
    Can Social Awareness Be Increased Through Business School Curricula?Bette Ann Stead & Janice J. Miller - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (7):553 - 560.
    The study was prompted by (a) Frederick and Vogel's debate concerning future research in business and society, (b) such recently reported managerial excesses as golden parachutes, greenmail, and fraud, (c) the increasing emphasis on coursework in the area. It appears that there is a need to assess how students, our future business leaders, perceive social issues and if a business and society course can help them define and understand the importance of these issues.Three questions provided the focal (...)
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  28.  9
    A Comparison of Ethical Evaluations of Business School Faculty and Students: A Pilot Study. [REVIEW]E. Stevens Robert, Harris O. Jeff & Williamson Stan - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (8):611 - 619.
    This paper reports the results of a pilot study of differences in ethical evaluations between business faculty and students at a Southern university. Data were collected from 137 business students (46 freshmen and 67 seniors) and 34 business faculty members. Significant differences were found in 7 of the 30 situations between freshmen and faculty and four situations between seniors and faculty. When the combined means for each group were tested, there was no significant difference in the means (...)
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  29.  15
    The Impact of an “Ethics Across the Curriculum” Initiative on the Cognitive Moral Development of Business School Undergraduates.Pedro F. Pellet - 2005 - Teaching Ethics 5 (2):31-72.
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  30.  2
    A Review Of: “Schools or Markets? Commercialism, Privatization, and School-Business Partnerships”. [REVIEW]David B. Bills & Ryan Wells - 2008 - Educational Studies 43 (2):158-162.
    (2008). A Review of: “Schools or Markets? Commercialism, Privatization, and School-Business Partnerships”. Educational Studies: Vol. 43, No. 2, pp. 158-162.
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    The Business School’s Right to Operate: Responsibilization and Resistance.David Murillo & Steen Vallentin - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  32.  82
    The “Ethical” Professor and the Undergraduate Student: Current Perceptions of Moral Behavior Among Business School Faculty. [REVIEW]Chet Robie & Roland E. Kidwell - 2003 - Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):153-173.
    A survey of 830 faculty members at 89 AASCB-accredited business schools throughout the United States was conducted in Fall 2002 to develop a snapshot of perceptions of ethical and unethical conduct with regard to undergraduate business instruction across a wide range of business disciplines. These behaviors fell into such categories as course content, evaluation of students, educational environment, disrespectful behavior, research and publication issues, financial and material transactions, social relationships with students, and sexual relationships with students and (...)
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  33. Perceptions of Business Ethics: Students Vs Business School Students.B. C. Cole & D. L. Smith - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 13:693-700.
     
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  34.  5
    A Business Ethics Experiential Learning Module: The Maryland Business School Experience.Stephen E. Loeb & Daniel T. Ostas - 1997 - Teaching Business Ethics 1 (1):21-32.
  35.  4
    Ethical Values and Leadership: A Study of Business School Deans in Canada.Nick Bontis & Adwoa Mould Mograbi - 2006 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 2 (3/4):217.
  36.  5
    Business School Ethics—An Overlooked Topic.Frederic E. Greenman & John F. Sherman Iii - 1999 - Business and Society Review 104 (2):171-177.
  37.  3
    Review of Defining Moments: When Managers Must Choose Between Right And Right. Defining Moments: When Managers Must Choose Between Right and Right Joseph L. Badaracco Jr. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Business School Press, 1997, 147 Pages. [REVIEW]Tom Mclnerney - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):163-167.
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  38.  12
    Developing Students' Competence for Ethical Reflection While Attending Business School.Heidi Weltzien Hoivivonk - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1).
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  39. Business School Ethics—An Overlooked Topic.Frederic E. Greenman & I. I. I. John F. Sherman - 1999 - Business and Society Review 104 (2):171-177.
  40. Branding the Business School : Considerations and Concerns.Denise T. Smart & Debbie Thorne McAlister - 2005 - In Sheb L. True, Linda Ferrell & O. C. Ferrell (eds.), Fulfilling Our Obligation: Perspectives on Teaching Business Ethics. Kennesaw State University.
     
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  41. The Business School in a Changing Knowledge Landscape.Ken Starkey - 2008 - In Harry Scarbrough (ed.), The Evolution of Business Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
  42. Ethical Decision Making in a Business or Business School Context.James Weber - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:1113-1118.
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    Thoughts on Ethics Education in the Business School Environment: An Interview with Dr. Jerry Trapnell, AACSB. [REVIEW]Michael J. Kennedy & Leland C. Horn - 2007 - Journal of Academic Ethics 5 (1):77-83.
  44.  42
    Griffith Business School.Kelli Lee Bodey - forthcoming - Philosophy.
  45.  60
    The Role of Philosophy in Public Policy – a Philosopher in a Business School.Norman E. Bowie - 1997 - Philosophical Studies 85 (2-3):119-133.
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    Catholic Social Thought and the Business School Curriculum.John Langan - 2000 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 11 (2):37-47.
  47.  9
    Turning a Blind Eye: A Study of Peer Reporting in a Business School Setting.Katarina Katja Mihelič & Barbara Culiberg - 2014 - Ethics and Behavior 24 (5):364-381.
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    Activating Built Pedagogy: A Genealogical Exploration of Educational Space at the University of Auckland Epsom Campus and Business School.Kirsten Locke - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (6):596-607.
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  49. Establishing a Research Ethics Committee in a Business School: A Chairperson's Perspective.M. Mullins & E. Doyle - 2010 - Research Ethics 6 (4):134-142.
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    Of the Darden Graduate School of Business, University of Virginia. All Papers Will Be Reviewed and Comments Sent to the Authors. The Guest Editors Will Make the Final Decision About Which Papers Will Be Published. The Papers Will Be Published in Issue 106.1 of the Journal, Which is the First Issue of the Year 2001. The Deadline for Submission of Papers is May 1, 2000. Please Send Three Hard Copies of the Paper. [REVIEW]Robert Frederick - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (429).
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