Results for 'Utopias'

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  1. Medical Utopias: Ethical Reflections About Emerging Medical Technologies.Bert Gordijn - 2006 - Peeters.
     
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  2.  24
    Cities of the Gods: Communist Utopias in Greek Thought.Doyne Dawson - 1992 - Oup Usa.
    Cities of the Gods is a historical study of the theory of Utopian communism in ancient Greek thought, identifying and assessing its several currents. The author looks at the reason for the decline of the Utopian traditions after c. 150 BC and suggests that the main factor was the Roman conquest of the Greek world, which produced a more conservative intellectual climate. He concludes by looking at the evidence for the survival of utopian traditions, particularly their influence on early Christianity.
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  3.  2
    Voyage to Utopias: A Fictional Guide Through Social Philosophy.Tony Fitzpatrick - 2010 - Policy Press.
    The book examines the concepts of freedom, responsibility, justice, and fairness and it shows how these are played out in different utopian futures of a range of socio-political regimes.
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  4. Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias.Judith A. Little (ed.) - 2007 - Prometheus Books.
     
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  5. Feminist Utopias in a Postmodern Era.Alkeline van Lenning, Marrie Bekker & Ine Vanwesenbeeck (eds.) - 1997 - Tilburg University Press.
  6.  41
    Labour's Utopias Revisited.Peter Beilharz - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 110 (1):46-53.
    This paper revisits a book I published 20 years ago. Labour’s Utopias – Bolshevism, Fabianism, Social Democracy (Routledge, 1992) began from the proposition that utopia was a ubiquitous figure in Western political and social thinking. On the Left the common sense has often been that reform and revolution are but different proposed roads to the same utopian end. Labour’s Utopias shows that this is not the case: Bolshevism, Fabianism and social democracy actually embody different ends. Revisiting the text (...)
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  7.  2
    Practical Utopias: America as Techno-Fix Nation.Howard P. Segal - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (2):231-246.
    At first glance, "practical utopias" might appear to be a contradiction in terms. If, to be sure, most utopian proponents would love to see their schemes realized, painfully few offer the practical skills and detailed blueprints to come close to that goal or to obtain a sufficient following to achieve long-term successes, whether sustainable utopian communities or substantial political and economic transformations or even lasting takeaways from temporary world's fairs. Yet "practical utopias" can legitimately be applied to the (...)
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  8.  3
    Utopies Et Catastrophe, Revers Et Renaissances de l'Utopie [Utopias and Catastrophe. Reversals and Revivals ] Ed. By Jean-Paul Engélibert and Raphaëlle Guidée.Lise Leibacher−Ouvrard - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (1):195-198.
    This first-rate collection of essays in French stems from several international colloquia organized by a joint research program on utopia and catastrophe at the universities of Bordeaux-Montaigne and Poitiers between 2011 and 2013. Globally, as the title of Jean-Paul Engélibert and Raphaelle Guidée's excellent introduction makes immediately clear, the volume questions and refutes the depreciation of utopia expressed frequently in the last decades: the contemporary propensity to point, if not to the death of utopia, to the flourishing of dystopias since (...)
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  9.  14
    Postmodern Utopias and Feminist Fictions by Jennifer A. Wagner-Lawlor.Phillip E. Wegner - 2016 - Utopian Studies 27 (1):124-128.
    Jennifer Wagner-Lawlor’s Postmodern Utopias and Feminist Fictions represents not only a significant contribution in utopian studies; it is also a major intervention in contemporary literary studies and global cultural studies more generally. Each of the book’s chapters is structured around a specific set of formal and generic questions, exploring in great detail and with a tremendous amount of insight recent feminist revisionings of older genres, including the bildungsroman, the novel of art, nonlinear histories, American historical novels, and finally, in (...)
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  10.  21
    Introduction: Utopias and Dystopias in Modern Spain.Carlos Ferrera & Juan Pro - 2015 - Utopian Studies 26 (2):326-328.
    Utopianism has found expression in several ways throughout history and has reflected the peculiarities of the cultural, political, social, and economic settings in which it has come about. Spain in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries has been no exception, because while the country has not occupied a significant place in the dominant historical narrative of utopias, recent research has begun to show that it was indeed where many tracts with utopian—and, by way of correlation, dystopian—content came on the scene. (...)
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  11.  16
    Cautious Utopias: Environmental Goal-Setting with Long Time Frames.Patrik Baard & Karin Edvardsson Björnberg - 2015 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 18 (2):187-201.
    Sustainable development is a common goal in the public sector but may be difficult to implement due to epistemic uncertainties and the long time frames required. This paper proposes that some of these problems can be solved by formulating cautious utopias, entailing a relationship between means and goals differing from both utopian and realistic goal-setting. Cautiously utopian goals are believed, but not certain, to be achievable and to remain desirable, but are open to future adjustments due to changing desires (...)
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  12.  31
    The End of the Utopias of Labor: Metaphors of the Machine in the Post-Fordist Era.Anson Rabinbach - 1998 - Thesis Eleven 53 (1):29-44.
    Are we rapidly approaching the end of the work-centered society? This article contends that at the century's end we may witness the disappearance of the great productivist utopias of the 1920s and 1930s. The crisis of productivist systems and ideologies may be far more significant than the more narrowly defined crisis of communism, or of `Fordism', that many critics have identified. Shifts in the forms of metaphor and the technology of work are taking place which call into question traditional (...)
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  13.  7
    Utopia or Utopias in the Gaps: From the Political to the 'Domestic'.M. Maffesoli - 2005 - Diogenes 52 (2):25-28.
    There is a question mark hanging over the two great markers of modern civilization in the so-called Judeo-Christian, or more accurately Semitic-western-modern tradition: monotheism is the first of these two great markers. The second is the Project, that is, the idea that real life is elsewhere, messianism. Life must be saved, healed. Based on this structural schizophrenia and this transcendent project can we talk about a humanism? Our western civilization has reached saturation point. This saturation is expressed in a polytheism (...)
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  14.  3
    Everyday Utopias: The Conceptual Life of Promising Spaces by Davina Cooper.S. Cummings Michael - 2016 - Utopian Studies 27 (3):649-655.
    Everyday Utopias explores a topic that is vital but is too often overlooked by utopian scholars. It is best read in tandem with its 2013 predecessor, Weak Messianism: Essays in Everyday Utopianism, by Michael Gardiner. In a nutshell, Cooper, like Gardiner, argues that although utopian visions may be born in the brains of utopian thinkers, progress toward utopia is what counts, and it must be rooted in present patterns and possibilities. Lest my qualms with the book’s execution overwhelm its (...)
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  15.  3
    Utopías Artísticas de Revuelta by Julia Ramírez Blanco.Fernando José Pereira - 2016 - Utopian Studies 27 (3):646-649.
    The book Utopías artísticas de revuelta is written in an experiential and engaged style. This dual format entails a whole range of inherent issues and limitations. It is, however, a choice that the author mentions early in the preamble in a clear and transparent manner.The book refers to artistic interventions and the very concept of art itself in a comprehensive way, considering art as well as all visual interventions that appear in the protests and in the various situations that are (...)
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  16.  39
    Utopias, Dolphins, and Computers: Problems in Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1996 - Routledge.
    In Utopias, Dolphins and Computers Mary Midgley brings philosophy into the real world by using it to consider environmental, educational and gender issues. From "Freedom, Feminism and War" to "Artificial Intelligence and Creativity," this book searches for what is distorting our judgement and helps us to see more clearly the dramas which are unfolding in the world around us. Utopias, Dolphins and Computers aims to counter today's anti-intellectualism, not to mention philosophy's twentieth-century view of itself as futile. Mary (...)
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  17.  5
    Dreamstreets: A Journey Through Britain's Village Utopias by Jacqueline Yallop.Lyman Tower Sargent - 2016 - Utopian Studies 27 (2):393-394.
    Although the title Dreamstreets and the use of the word utopias in the subtitle strongly suggest a focus on the utopian, there are only a few references to utopia in the book, which is about the author’s responses to some of the model villages established in Britain in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The author says that there were about four hundred such villages, and she has visited many I have not visited and know little about; she is (...)
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  18.  10
    Utopias: A Brief History From Ancient Writings to Virtual Communities by Howard P. Segal.Nicole Pohl - 2015 - Utopian Studies 26 (2):402-404.
    Howard P. Segal is well known to the utopian scholarly community, particularly with his excellent work on technology and utopianism in publications such as Technological Utopianism in American Culture, Future Imperfect: The Mixed Blessings of Technology in America, Technology in America: A Brief History, and Recasting the Machine Age: Henry Ford’s Village Industries. His most recent book, Utopias: A Brief History from Ancient Writings to Virtual Communities, is part of the Wiley-Blackwell Brief Histories of Religion Series and serves as (...)
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  19.  1
    Ökonomische Utopien Und Ihre Bilder in Science-Fiction-Filmen [Economical Utopias and Their Images in Science Fiction Films] by Heike Endter.Schmeink Lars - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (1):221-224.
    At the heart of Heike Endter's 2009 dissertation, published in 2011 as Ökonomische Utopien und ihre Bilder in Science-Fiction-Filmen, lies the assumption that art history, as a field and with its unique methodology, can provide an insight into film studies that has not yet been discovered and made accessible. Interestingly, Endter seeks to argue this unique insight as a benefit of art history, a discipline threatened by neoliberal ideals of employability, by analyzing a field of interconnected terms that directly address (...)
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  20.  25
    'Nothing is, but What is Not': Utopias as Practical Political Philosophy.Peter G. Stillman - 2000 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (2-3):9-24.
    (2000). ‘Nothing is, but what is not’: Utopias as practical political philosophy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 3, The Philosophy of Utopia, pp. 9-24.
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  21.  7
    Green Utopias of Self and Other.Lucy Sargisson - 2000 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 3 (2-3):140-156.
    (2000). Green Utopias of self and other. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 3, The Philosophy of Utopia, pp. 140-156.
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  22.  4
    La utopía de las playas de Saturno. (socio-psicología, epistemología y emoción de las utopías).María Teresa Pozzoli - 2004 - Polis 8.
    El artículo considera el aspecto socio-psicológico y epistemológico de las utopías, y se plantea conectar utopía con la emoción. Revisa las condiciones de modernización económica y democratización que han derivado en el descreimiento de las utopías, y los valores que dotan de identidad a los sujetos que las adoptan. Se pone el acento en la necesidad de reformular la concepción del fenómeno del poder y de sus prácticas, y en la trascendencia que la tarea educativa tiene de re-encantar de utopías (...)
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  23.  2
    Hacia un rescate de utopías y sueños colectivos.Antonio Elizalde & Eduardo Yentzen - 2003 - Polis 6.
    Sin utopía la vida sería un ensayo para la muerte(Joan Manuel Serrat)El imaginario que se ha ido instalando en el mundo que vivimos, ha desechado lo que ha sido un elemento constitutivo hasta ahora en la historia de la humanidad: la capacidad de soñar con un mundo distinto y mejor al que hemos sido capaces hasta ahora de construir. Hemos pasado abruptamente desde una época casi delirantemente utópica, al descrédito y desplome casi absoluto de todas las utopías. El desplome de (...)
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  24. Four Island Utopias: Being Plato's Atlantis, Euhemeros of Messene's Panchaia, Iamboulos' Island of the Sun, and Sir Francis Bacon's New Atlantis.Clay Diskin & L. Purvis Andrea (eds.) - 1999 - Focus.
    Four Island Utopias provides a convenient compilation of four key texts, important for the understanding of utopian thinking in the ancient world and middle ages, along with maps and an extensive introduction to Classical Utopian thought. Ideal for courses in utopian thought.
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  25. Utopías libertarias en Chile, siglos XIX y XX.Rafael Gumucio - 2003 - Polis 6.
    El presente artículo reivindica para el Chile de hoy las ideas de libertad, igualdad y fraternidad como utopías, capaces de transformar lo inaceptable del momento presente reivindicando sueños despiertos y horizontes de esperanza. Advierte que no todo utopía es liberadora, reclama una revolución copernicana de la política, rescata los sueños igualitarios en el Chile decimonónico y declara que las experiencias humanistas propias del utopismo han tendido a ser subvaloradas. Concluye con una crítica a la idolatría del mercado y consignando que (...)
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  26. A Tale of Two Enclosures: Self and Society as a Setting for Utopias.B. Mazlish - 2003 - Theory, Culture and Society 20 (1):43-60.
    Utopian thinking, and utopias as a genre, flourished as forms of the imaginary until recently. The emergence of the genre, with Thomas More, emphasizing spatial arrangement and with Louis-Sébastien Mercier invoking future orientation, I argue, is illuminated by placing them next to the economic enclosures of their time. Their utopias, however, closed off both the individual and time from the capitalist changes around them, allowing for little or no variation or expression of self. Thus, their imagined virtuous societies (...)
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  27. Utopias, Dolphins and Computers: Problems in Philosophical Plumbing.Mary Midgley - 1996 - Routledge.
    Why do the big philosophical questions so often strike us as far-fetched and little to with everyday life? Mary Midgley shows that it need not be that way; she shows that there is a need for philosophy in the real world. Her popularity as one of our foremost philosophers is based on a no-nonsense, down-to-earth approach to fundamental human problems, philosphical or otherwise. In _Utopias, Dolphins and Computers_ she makes her case for philosophy as a difficult but necessary tool for (...)
     
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  28. Dial P for Philosophy (Review of Mary Midgley's Utopias, Dolphins and Computers.). [REVIEW]Ray Scott Percival - 1997 - New Scientist (2066).
    Mary Midgley's book Utopias, Dolphins and Computers will be needed to recharge our more philosophical approach to life as new problems present themselves to humanity at an accelerated rate. The most dangerous attitude to these challenges, Midgley argues, is an anti-intellectualism that fails to see that all approaches presuppose tacit or hidden assumptions, that is a philosophy. One part of our tacit philosophy that is now breaking up is the social contract, according to Mary Midgley in Utopias, Dolphins (...)
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  29. Utopias of Women's Time.J. B. Schor - 1997 - In Alkeline van Lenning, Marrie Bekker & Ine Vanwesenbeeck (eds.), Feminist Utopias in a Postmodern Era. Tilburg University Press. pp. 45--54.
     
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  30. Political Utopias: Contemporary Debates.K. Vallier & M. Weber (eds.) - 2017 - Oup Usa.
    Contemporary political philosophers disagree about whether theories of justice should be utopian or realistic. Contributors to this volume largely deny that the choice between realism and idealism is binary. Their contributions represent a continuum between realism and idealism that best represents the contemporary state of the debate.
     
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  31.  7
    What “Realistic Utopias” Are — and Aren’T.William A. Galston - 2016 - Social Philosophy and Policy 33 (1-2):235-251.
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  32. Traditions, Tyranny, and Utopias: Essays in the Politics of Awareness.Ashis Nandy - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    These six essays present an outsider's view of Western norms of progress, rationality, and maturity, and offer an alternate perspective on oppression in modern times. Well-known psychologist and social theorist Ashis Nandy stresses the importance of considering world views held by the "non-modern" cultures of the Third World in formulating a more humane and less technologically preoccupied vision of progress. Institutionalized oppression is seen as a process which co-opts the physical and psychological worlds of its victims and destroys the basis (...)
     
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  33.  98
    Factories, Utopias, Decoration and Upholstery: On Utopia, Modernism, and Everyday Life.Antonis Balasopoulos - 2014 - Utopian Studies 25 (2):268-298.
    To the extent that the nature of the relationship between utopian and modernist fiction has preoccupied literary history at all, such reflection has tended to be overshadowed by the devastating irony with which Virginia Woolf treats the fiction of H. G. Wells, among other prominent writers of the so-called Edwardian period. In two interrelated essays originally published between 1923 and 1924—“Mr Bennett and Mrs Brown” and “ Character in Fiction”—Woolf inverts Arnold Bennett’s pejorative estimation of the modernists’ novelistic craft by (...)
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  34.  4
    Envisioning Real Utopias, Erik Olin Wright, London: Verso, 2010.David F. Ruccio - 2011 - Historical Materialism 19 (4):219-227.
  35.  93
    Problems of Utopias.R. Falke & E. Cooper - 1958 - Diogenes 6 (23):14-22.
  36.  5
    Narrative Utopias? Utopia as Narrative? Notes on Millennium as a Narrative Structure.Michael J. Brisbois - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (1):130-147.
    This article explores the extent to which millenarianism can be understood as a narrative structure and even a potential "master plot" akin to quest and stranger motifs. The idea of a radical, utopian response to sociocultural crisis is a recurrent theme in literature, most apparent in science fiction and fantasy but also present in "literary" fiction, poetry, and drama. There have been previous attempts to describe millenarianism as a narrative, but such attempts have been in the direction of sociologists or (...)
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  37.  55
    Anarchism, Utopias and Philosophy of Education.Judith Suissa - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (4):627–646.
  38. Mutant Utopias: Evening Primroses and Imagined Futures in Early Twentieth-Century America.Jim Endersby - 2013 - Isis 104 (3):471-503.
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  39.  7
    Utopias, Past and Present: Why Thomas More Remains Astonishingly Radical.Eagleton Terry - 2016 - Utopian Studies 27 (3):412-417.
    Thomas More’s Utopia, a book that will be 500 years old next year, is astonishingly radical stuff. Not many lord chancellors of England have denounced private property, advocated a form of communism and described the current social order as a “conspiracy of the rich.” Such men, the book announces, are “greedy, unscrupulous and useless.” There are a great number of noblemen, More complains, who live like drones on the labour of others. Tenants are evicted so that “one insatiable glutton and (...)
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  40. Sexualities Without Genders and Other Queer Utopias.Biddy Martin - 1994 - Diacritics 24 (2-3):104-121.
     
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  41. Nirvana and Other Buddhist Felicities: Utopias of the Pali Imaginaire.Steven Collins - 1999 - Utopian Studies 10 (1):176-179.
     
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  42.  42
    More's Utopia and the New World Utopias.Patrick K. Dooley - 1985 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 60 (1):31-48.
  43.  36
    Andreas Hofer and the 1809 Uprisings in Trentino and the Tyrol. Identity and Culture of a People at War Against Utopias.F. Turrini - 2002 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 31 (1-3):165-188.
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  44.  4
    Moving the Culture Toward More Vivid Utopias with Survival as the Goal.Van Rensselaer Potter - 2001 - Global Bioethics 14 (4):19-30.
  45.  25
    Progressive Utopias and Collectivist Nightmares.Philip Jenkins - 2001 - The Chesterton Review 27 (3):317-329.
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  46.  45
    Utopias in the Islamic Middle Ages: Ibn Ṭufayl and Ibn Al-Nafīs.Marco Lauri - 2013 - Utopian Studies 24 (1):23-40.
    The purpose of this essay is to examine two important treatises of the Islamic classical age in the light of utopian discourse. The works considered are the “philosophical novels” Risālat Ḥayy ibn Yaqẓān f ī asrār al-ḥikmat al-mašriqiyya (Treatise of the Alive, son of the Awake, on the secrets of oriental wisdom) by Ibn Ṭufayl (d. 1185) and Risālat Kāmiliyya f ī al-Sīra al-Nabawiyya (Treatise of Kāmil on the Life of the Prophet) by Ibn al-Naf īs (d. 1288). Together with (...)
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  47.  32
    Utopias and the Art of the Possible.Timothy Chappell - 2008 - Analyse & Kritik 30 (1).
    I begin this paper by examining what MacIntyre has to tell us about radical disagreements: how they have arisen, and how to deal with them, within a polity. I conclude by radically disagreeing with Macintyre: I shall suggest that he offers no credible alternative to liberalism's account of radical disagreements and how to deal with them. To put it dilemmatically: insofar as what MacIntyre says is credible, it is not an alternative to liberalism; insofar as he presents a genuine alternative (...)
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  48.  65
    Imaginative Power of Utopias: A Hermeneutic for its Recovery.James Rurak - 1981 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 8 (2):185-206.
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    Erratum To: Utopias of Return: Notes on (Post-)Soviet Culture and its Frustrated (Post-)Modernization.Evgeny Dobrenko - 2011 - Studies in East European Thought 63 (2):173-173.
    This article discusses the role of representative strategies in twentieth-century Russian culture. Just as Russia interacted with Europe in the Marquis de Custine’s time via discourse and representation, in the twentieth century Russia re-entered European consciousness by simulating ‘socialism’. In the post-Soviet era, the nation aspired to be admitted to the ‘European house’ by simulating a ‘market economy’, ‘democracy’, and ‘postmodernism’. But in reality Russia remains the same country as before, torn between the reality of its own helplessness and poverty, (...)
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  50.  49
    Leibniz-Frege, ¿utopías de la razón conceptual?Javier de Lorenzo - 1991 - Theoria 6 (1/2):97-114.
    The dream of Leibniz and that of Frege, to create a lingua characteristica in order to demonstrate conceptual thought, incorporates in a wider process, the division and tension between the distinct Spheres which the human sub-species have been creating. Spheres which remain hidden by natural language, essentially spoken language. For the creation and demonstration of the Conceptual Sphere the establishing of a language of characteres has become indispensable, essentially written language. Is a consequence a tension is established between Natural language-Formal (...)
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