Results for 'Values in design'

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  1. Institute on Human Values in Medicine Human Values Teaching Programs for Health Professionals.Lorraine L. Hunt, Edmund D. Pellegrino, Institute of Human Values in Medicine & Society for Health and Human Values - 1974 - Society for Health and Human Values.
     
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  2.  67
    What Values in Design? The Challenge of Incorporating Moral Values Into Design.Noëmi Manders-Huits - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (2):271-287.
    Recently, there is increased attention to the integration of moral values into the conception, design, and development of emerging IT. The most reviewed approach for this purpose in ethics and technology so far is Value-Sensitive Design (VSD). This article considers VSD as the prime candidate for implementing normative considerations into design. Its methodology is considered from a conceptual, analytical, normative perspective. The focus here is on the suitability of VSD for integrating moral values into the (...)
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  3.  37
    Values in Design Sciences.Ilkka Niiniluoto - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 46:11-15.
    Following Herbert Simon’s idea of “the sciences of the artificial”, one may contrast descriptive sciences and design sciences: the former are concerned with “how things are”, the latter tell us “how things ought to be in order to attain goals, and to function”. Typical results of design sciences are thus expressions about means—ends relations or technical norms in G. H. von Wright’s sense. Theorizing and modeling are important methods of giving a value-free epistemic justification for such technical norms. (...)
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  4.  3
    What and Whose Values in Design?Anne Gerdes - 2014 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 12 (1):18-20.
    Purpose: The paper aims to represent a response to the invited paper by Ellen Christiansen: “From ethics of the eye to ethics of the hand in participatory design and development of digital technologies”. -/- Design/methodology/approach: The response takes departure in Christiansen's view points regarding dialogue-oriented collaborative prototyping as a mean to address values in design. -/- Findings: The response points to the limitations of Christiansen's approach in claiming that dialogue cannot by itself ensure integration of ethics (...)
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  5. Net Work: Ethics and Values in Web Design.Helen Kennedy - 2012 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- List of Figures and Tables -- Acknowledgements -- PART I: FRAMING WEB DESIGN -- A Book About Web Design -- A Framework for Thinking About Web Design -- A Brief History of Web Design -- PART II: ETHICS AND VALUES IN WEB DESIGN -- Web Standards and the Self-Regulation of Web Designers -- The Fragile Ethics of Web Accessibility -- Going the Extra Mile? Web Accessibility for People with Intellectual (...)
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  6.  34
    Values and Pragmatic Action: The Challenges of Introducing Ethical Intelligence in Technical Design Communities.Noëmi Manders-Huits & Michael Zimmer - 2009 - International Review of Information Ethics 10 (2):37-45.
    Various Value-Conscious Design frameworks have recently emerged to introduce moral and ethical intelligence into business and technical design contexts, with the goal of proactively influencing the design of technologies to account for moral and ethical values during the conception and design process. Two attempts to insert ethical intelligence into technical design communities to influence the design of technologies in ethical- and value-conscious ways are described, revealing discouraging results. Learning from these failed attempts, the (...)
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  7.  7
    How to Weigh Values in Value Sensitive Design: A Best Worst Method Approach for the Case of Smart Metering.Geerten van de Kaa, Jafar Rezaei, Behnam Taebi, Ibo van de Poel & Abhilash Kizhakenath - forthcoming - Science and Engineering Ethics:1-20.
    Proactively including the ethical and societal issues of new technologies could have a positive effect on their acceptance. These issues could be captured in terms of values. In the literature, the values stakeholders deem important for the development of technology have often been identified. However, the relative ranking of these values in relation to each other have not been studied often. The best worst method is proposed as a possible method to determine the weights of values, (...)
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  8.  25
    Sources of Values in the Environmental Design Professions: The Case of Landscape Architecture.Ian Thompson - 2000 - Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (2):203 – 219.
    This paper presents a framework for understanding the value systems inherent in landscape architectural practice. It is based upon a close analytical reading of the academic and professional literature, supported by a series of in-depth interviews with mid- and late-career British landscape architects. The empirical results of these interviews will be presented in a future paper. A tripartite classification of values is suggested, based upon the categories of the aesthetic, the social and the environmental, each of which is internally (...)
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  9. Embodying Values in Design: Theory and Practice.M. Flanagan, D. Howe & H. Nissenbaum - 2008 - In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 322--353.
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  10. Values in Engineering Design.Ibo Van de Poel - 2009 - In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Handbook of the Philosophy of Science. pp. 973-1006.
     
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  11.  3
    Sources of Values in the Environmental Design Professions: The Case of Landscape Architecture.Ian Thompson - 2000 - Philosophy and Geography 3 (2):203-219.
  12.  38
    Values Engineering: The Ethics of Design in Community Health Centers.Benjamin Boltin & Nancy Berlinger - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (1):27-28.
    Architecture, like ethics, concerns actual rather than ideal choices. William James's remarks on ethics, at a meeting of the Yale Philosophical Club in 1890, could apply equally well to the built environment:The actual possible in this world is vastly narrower than all that is demanded; and there is always a pinch between the ideal and the actual which can only be got through by leaving part of the ideal behind. There is hardly a good which we can imagine except as (...)
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  13.  39
    Anticipatory Ethics for a Future Internet: Analyzing Values During the Design of an Internet Infrastructure.Katie Shilton - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (1):1-18.
    The technical details of Internet architecture affect social debates about privacy and autonomy, intellectual property, cybersecurity, and the basic performance and reliability of Internet services. This paper explores one method for practicing anticipatory ethics in order to understand how a new infrastructure for the Internet might impact these social debates. This paper systematically examines values expressed by an Internet architecture engineering team—the Named Data Networking project—based on data gathered from publications and internal documents. Networking engineers making technical choices also (...)
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  14.  18
    Influence and Prioritization of Non-Epistemic Values in Clinical Trial Designs: A Study of Ebola Ça Suffit Trial.Joby Varghese - forthcoming - Synthese:1-17.
    The recent Ebola virus disease outbreak in Western African countries has raised questions regarding the feasibility of adopting conventional trial designs such as randomized controlled trials for conducting experimental trials in the midst of a fatal epidemic. In the context of Ebola ça Suffit trial conducted in Guinea for testing the efficacy and effectiveness of rVSV–ZEBOV, a candidate vaccine, I argue that the trial design and the methodologies adopted for the trial have been rightly chosen for their ethical appropriateness (...)
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  15. Bias and Values in Scientific Research.Torsten Wilholt - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):92-101.
    When interests and preferences of researchers or their sponsors cause bias in experimental design, data interpretation or dissemination of research results, we normally think of it as an epistemic shortcoming. But as a result of the debate on science and values, the idea that all extra-scientific influences on research could be singled out and separated from pure science is now widely believed to be an illusion. I argue that nonetheless, there are cases in which research is rightfully regarded (...)
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  16.  36
    For All Good Reasons: Role of Values in Organizational Sustainability. [REVIEW]Liviu Florea, Yu Ha Cheung & Neil C. Herndon - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):393-408.
    Management practices are at the heart of most organizations’ sustainability efforts. Despite the importance of values for the design and implementation of such practices, few researchers have analyzed how human values, particularly ethical values, relate to human resource management practices in organizations. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to integrate scholarship on organizational sustainability, human resource practices, and values in delineating how four specific values—altruism, empathy, positive norm of reciprocity, and private self-effacement—support effective (...)
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  17. The Ecological Turn in Design: Adopting A Posthumanist Ethics to Inform Value Sensitive Design.Steven Umbrello - manuscript
    Design for Values (DfV) philosophies are a series of design approaches that aim to incorporate human values into the early phases of technological design to direct the path of innovation into beneficial directions. The difficulty and necessity of directing advantageous futures of transformative technologies through the application and adoption of value-based design approaches are apparent, however, the questions of whose values are taken up are of critical importance. DfV philosophies typically aim to enrol (...)
     
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  18.  2
    Poetry as a Cross-Cultural Analysis and Sensitizing Tool in Design.Patrizia Marti & E. B. Van der Houwen - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (3):545-558.
    The overall trend toward globalization in design, greatly enhanced by digital technologies, has raised issues and challenges on how to preserve the cultural differences and values of different societies. There is a tendency to lose touch with local cultural values when designing artefacts for global use, and social nuances and traditions risk to be flattened or stereotyped in the pursuit of developing new technologies and products for the global society. Attempts to reduce the tension between the global (...)
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    Ethicist as Designer: A Pragmatic Approach to Ethics in the Lab.Aimee van Wynsberghe & Scott Robbins - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):947-961.
    Contemporary literature investigating the significant impact of technology on our lives leads many to conclude that ethics must be a part of the discussion at an earlier stage in the design process i.e., before a commercial product is developed and introduced. The problem, however, is the question regarding how ethics can be incorporated into an earlier stage of technological development and it is this question that we argue has not yet been answered adequately. There is no consensus amongst scholars (...)
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  20.  75
    How Values in Scientific Discovery and Pursuit Alter Theory Appraisal.Kevin Elliott & Daniel McKaughan - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):598-611.
    Philosophers of science readily acknowledge that nonepistemic values influence the discovery and pursuit of scientific theories, but many tend to regard these influences as epistemically uninteresting. The present paper challenges this position by identifying three avenues through which nonepistemic values associated with discovery and pursuit in contemporary pollution research influence theory appraisal: (1) by guiding the choice of questions and research projects, (2) by altering experimental design, and (3) by affecting the creation and further investigation of theories (...)
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  21.  20
    Lockbox: Mobility, Privacy and Values in Cloud Storage. [REVIEW]Luke Stark & Matt Tierney - 2014 - Ethics and Information Technology 16 (1):1-13.
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  22.  34
    Aesthetic, Social and Ecological Values in Landscape Architecture: A Discourse Analysis.Ian Thompson - 2000 - Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (3):269 – 287.
    This paper presents the results of a qualitative investigation into the ethical and aesthetic values held by late- and mid-career landscape architects in the UK. It identifies the dominant discourses within three value areas, the aesthetic, the social and the environmental. Within the web of value discourses, some are clearly conflicting, while others are compatible or mutually supporting. The most prevalent values are those associated with 'technocentric accommodation'. A 'trivalent' approach to design is advocated which combines (...) from the three main areas. (shrink)
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  23. Imaginative Value Sensitive Design: How Moral Imagination Exceeds Moral Law Theories in Informing Responsible Innovation.Steven Umbrello - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
    Safe-by-Design (SBD) frameworks for the development of emerging technologies have become an ever more popular means by which scholars argue that transformative emerging technologies can safely incorporate human values. One such popular SBD methodology is called Value Sensitive Design (VSD). A central tenet of this design methodology is to investigate stakeholder values and design those values into technologies during early stage research and development (R&D). To accomplish this, the VSD framework mandates that designers (...)
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  24. Designing AI for Explainability and Verifiability: A Value Sensitive Design Approach to Avoid Artificial Stupidity in Autonomous Vehicles.Steven Umbrello & Roman Yampolskiy - manuscript
    One of the primary, if not most critical, difficulties in the design and implementation of autonomous systems is the black-boxed nature of the decision-making structures and logical pathways of autonomous systems. For this reason, the values of stakeholders become of particular significance given the risks posed by opaque structures of intelligent agents (IAs). This paper proposes the Value Sensitive Design (VSD) approach as a principled framework for incorporating these values in design. The example of autonomous (...)
     
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  25.  10
    Ethical Sharing of Health Data in Online Platforms- Which Values Should Be Considered?Brígida Riso, Aaro Tupasela, Danya F. Vears, Heike Felzmann, Julian Cockbain, Michele Loi, Nana C. H. Kongsholm, Silvia Zullo & Vojin Rakic - 2017 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 13 (1):1-27.
    Intensified and extensive data production and data storage are characteristics of contemporary western societies. Health data sharing is increasing with the growth of Information and Communication Technology platforms devoted to the collection of personal health and genomic data. However, the sensitive and personal nature of health data poses ethical challenges when data is disclosed and shared even if for scientific research purposes. With this in mind, the Science and Values Working Group of the COST Action CHIP ME ‘Citizen's Health (...)
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  26.  18
    Explicit Training in Human Values and Social Attitudes of Future Engineers in Spain.Jaime Fabregat - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1551-1556.
    In Spain before the 1990s there was no clear and explicit comprehensive training for future engineers with regard to social responsibility and social commitment. Following the Spanish university curricular reform, which began in the early 1990s, a number of optional subjects became available to students, concerning science, technology and society (STS), international cooperation, the environment and sustainability. The latest redefinition of the Spanish curriculum in line with the Bologna agreements has reduced the number of non-obligatory subjects, but could lead to (...)
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  27.  41
    The Stakes in Bayh-Dole: Public Values Beyond the Pace of Innovation.Walter D. Valdivia - 2011 - Minerva 49 (1):25-46.
    Evaluation studies of the Bayh-Dole Act are generally concerned with the pace of innovation or the transgressions to the independence of research. While these concerns are important, I propose here to expand the range of public values considered in assessing Bayh-Dole and formulating future reforms. To this end, I first examine the changes in the terms of the Bayh-Dole debate and the drift in its design. Neoliberal ideas have had a definitive influence on U.S. innovation policy for the (...)
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  28.  14
    Ethical Considerations for a Better Collaboration Between Architects and Structural Engineers: Design of Buildings with Reinforced Concrete Frame Systems in Earthquake Zones. [REVIEW]Yonca Hurol - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):597-612.
    Architects design building structures, although structural design is the profession of structural engineers. Thus, it is better for architects and structural engineers to collaborate starting from the initial phases of the architectural design. However, this is not very common because of the contradictory design processes and value systems held within the two professions. This article provides a platform upon which architects and structural engineers can resolve the value conflicts between them by analysing phases of the structural (...)
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  29. Incommensurability and Rationality in Engineering Design: The Case of Functional Decomposition.Dingmar van Eck - 2011 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 15 (2):118-136.
    In engineering design research different models of functional decomposition are advanced side-by-side. In this paper I explain and validate this co-existence of models in terms of the Kuhnian thesis of methodological incommensurability. I advance this analysis in terms of the thesis’ construal of theory choice in terms of values, expanding this notion to the engineering domain. I further argue that the implicated threat of the thesis to rational theory choice has no force in the functional decomposition case: co-existence (...)
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  30.  2
    The Importance of Professional Values From Clinical Nurses’ Perspective in Hospitals of a Medical University in Iran.Batool Poorchangizi, Jamileh Farokhzadian, Abbas Abbaszadeh, Moghaddameh Mirzaee & Fariba Borhani - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):20.
    Today, nurses are required to have knowledge and awareness concerning professional values as standards to provide safe and high-quality ethical care. Nurses’ perspective on professional values affects decision-making and patient care. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the importance of professional values from clinical nurses’ perspective. The present cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 in four educational hospitals of Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Data were collected via the Persian version of Nursing Professional Values (...)
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  31.  7
    Contested Technologies and Design for Values: The Case of Shale Gas.Marloes Dignum, Aad Correljé, Eefje Cuppen, Udo Pesch & Behnam Taebi - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):1171-1191.
    The introduction of new energy technologies may lead to public resistance and contestation. It is often argued that this phenomenon is caused by an inadequate inclusion of relevant public values in the design of technology. In this paper we examine the applicability of the value sensitive design approach. While VSD was primarily introduced for incorporating values in technological design, our focus in this paper is expanded towards the design of the institutions surrounding these technologies, (...)
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  32.  15
    People, Values, and Woodlands: A Field Report Ofemergent Themes in Interdisciplinary Research in Zimbabwe. [REVIEW]Allison Goebel, Bruce Campbell, Billy Mukamuri & Michele Veeman - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (4):385-396.
    The Value of Trees project, funded bythe International Development Research Council ofCanada (IDRC), supported the joint efforts of theUniversity of Alberta and the University of Zimbabweto investigate the economic costs and benefitsassociated with trees and forests in the small holderfarming sector in Zimbabwe. The Value of Trees project provided funding for graduate students andfaculty from the two participating universities tocarry out studies in the disciplines of forestry,agricultural economics, and sociology in order toprovide policy recommendations regarding the role ofwoodlands in sustainable (...)
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  33.  3
    The Impact of Cultural Values on the Development of the Cultural Industry: Case of the Kente Textile Industry in Adanwomase of the Kwabre East District, Ghana.Asibey Michael Osei, Agyeman Kwasi Osei & Yeboah Vivian - 2017 - Journal of Human Values 23 (3):200-217.
    The importance of cultural enterprises to the creation of jobs, generating incomes, alleviating poverty and distributing development has long been recognized. Based on empirical research, this article adopts the convergent parallel mixed design to assess extent of influence of cultural values on the type of cultural industry established in Ghana, taking a case of the kente textile industry in Adanwomase. Adanwomase is argued to be a prominent traditional community in the printing of kente cloths in Ghana. Primary data (...)
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  34.  30
    Instrumentalization Theory and Reflexive Design in Animal Husbandry.A. P. Bos - 2008 - Social Epistemology 22 (1):29 – 50.
    In animal husbandry in The Netherlands, as in a wide variety of other societal areas, we see an increased awareness of the fact that progress cannot be attained anymore by simply repeating the way we modernized this sector in the decades before, due to the multiplicity of the problems to be dealt with. The theory of reflexive modernization articulates this macro-social phenomenon, and at the same time serves as a prescriptive master-narrative. In this paper, I analyse the relationship between Feenberg's (...)
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  35.  2
    In Sweet Harmony or in Bitter Discord? How Cultural Values and Stakeholder Requirements Shape and Users Read an Urban Computing Technology.Leena Ventä-Olkkonen, Netta Iivari & Arto Lanamäki - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (3):455-476.
    Culture is, in many ways, implicated in and shapes technology design and use. Inspired by Stuart Hall’s conception of encoding/decoding, we maintain that technological artefacts reflect the cultural values of their creators, while users, in their encounters with the technological artefacts, may decode those artefacts in various ways that are shaped by the users’ cultural values. In this article, we apply this lens to study a decade-long urban computing project that took place in the wild. We focus (...)
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    Role of Education in Cultivation of Values.Dhanpat Raj Bhandari - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 49:31-38.
    The prime concern of education is to evolve the good, the true and the divine in man so as to establish a moral life in the world. It should essentially make a man pious, perfect and truthful. The welfare of humanity lies neither in scientific or technological advancements nor in acquisition of material comforts. The main function of education is to enrich the character. What we need today more than anything else is moral leadership founded on courage, intellectual integrity and (...)
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  37.  9
    Changes in Taiwanese Nursing Student Values During the Educational Experience.Yu-Hua Lin, Liching Sung Wang, Susan Yarbrough, Danita Alfred & Pam Martin - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (5):646-654.
    Professional values are standards for action and provide a framework for evaluating behavior. This study examined changes in the professional values of nursing students between their entrance to and graduation from an undergraduate nursing program. A pre- and post-test design was employed. A convenience sample of 94 students from a university in Taiwan was surveyed. Data were collected from students during the sophomore and senior years. Total scores obtained for the revised Nurses Professional Values Scale during (...)
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  38.  7
    Values-Based Curriculum Development in a Study Abroad Program.Phillip Frank - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 14:285-297.
    Ethics have taken a center stage in business curriculum development over the past 5 years. Sustainable business practices are an important issue when it comes to adequately educating the next generation of marketing professionals. A variety of approaches in how to achieve such goals have been proposed as ideal methodologies. This paper presents a case study on curriculum development for a study abroad trip in Cambodia for marketing students. Furthermore, this article represents one method to incorporate the role of NGOs (...)
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    Developing Tools to Counteract and Prevent Suicide Bomber Incidents: A Case Study in Value Sensitive Design.Lambèr Royakkers & Marc Steen - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (4):1041-1058.
    Developers and designers make all sorts of moral decisions throughout an innovation project. In this article, we describe how teams of developers and designers engaged with ethics in the early phases of innovation based on case studies in the SUBCOP project. For that purpose, Value Sensitive Design will be used as a reference. Specifically, we focus on the following two research questions: How can researchers/developers learn about users’ perspectives and values during the innovation process? and How can researchers/developers (...)
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    Cultural Variations in Virtual Spaces Design.Antonella Angeli - 2009 - AI and Society 24 (3):213-223.
    This paper reports two studies investigating the role of culture on the design and personalisation of virtual spaces. The first study was a systematic analysis of 60 MSN virtual spaces belonging to British and Chinese students. The analysis concentrated on design patterns and communication style. The second study was an on-line survey designed to compare the relative importance of cultural values and personality traits on self-reported behaviour with, and preferences for, virtual space design. Results highlighted the (...)
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  41.  12
    Situated (Un-)Learning in Software Design: A Deconstructive Approach.Roswitha Hofmann & Doris Allhutter - 2010 - Poiesis and Praxis 7 (1-2):87-98.
    Constructive technology assessment aims at anticipating societal impacts of technological innovations and suggests incorporating reflexivity and social learning into technology development. Social learning involves fostering the ability of diverse social actors to cultivate sociotechnical critical skills, thus allowing technological and social change to be governed with consideration for social values and diverging interests. Based on this demand, our paper presents a discourse-theoretical, interventionist approach to software design introducing deconstruction and (un-)learning as reflective practices to guide development processes. Inspired (...)
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  42. Values in Science Beyond Underdetermination and Inductive Risk.Matthew J. Brown - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (5):829-839.
    Proponents of the value ladenness of science rely primarily on arguments from underdetermination or inductive risk, which share the premise that we should only consider values where the evidence runs out or leaves uncertainty; they adopt a criterion of lexical priority of evidence over values. The motivation behind lexical priority is to avoid reaching conclusions on the basis of wishful thinking rather than good evidence. This is a real concern, however, that giving lexical priority to evidential considerations over (...)
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  43.  98
    Distinguishing Between Legitimate and Illegitimate Values in Climate Modeling.Kristen Intemann - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (2):217-232.
    While it is widely acknowledged that science is not “free” of non-epistemic values, there is disagreement about the roles that values can appropriately play. Several have argued that non-epistemic values can play important roles in modeling decisions, particularly in addressing uncertainties ; Risbey 2007; Biddle and Winsberg 2010; Winsberg : 111-137, 2012); van der Sluijs 359-389, 2012). On the other hand, such values can lead to bias ; Bray ; Oreskes and Conway 2010). Thus, it is (...)
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  44.  91
    From Tapestry to Loom: Broadening the Perspective on Values in Science.Heather Douglas - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10 (8).
    After raising some minor philosophical points about Kevin Elliott’s A Tapestry of Values (2017), I argue that we should expand on the themes raised in the book and that philosophers of science need to pay as much attention to the loom of science (i.e., the institutional structures which guide the pursuit of science) as the tapestry of science. The loom of science includes such institutional aspects as patents, funding sources, and evaluation regimes that shape how science gets pursued, and (...)
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  45.  31
    Practical Versus Moral Identities in Identity Management.Noëmi Manders-Huits - 2010 - Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):43-55.
    Over the past decade Identity Management has become a central theme in information technology, policy, and administration in the public and private sectors. In these contexts the term ‘Identity Management’ is used primarily to refer to ways and methods of dealing with registration and authorization issues regarding persons in organizational and service-oriented domains. Especially due to the growing range of choices and options for, and the enhanced autonomy and rights of, employees, citizens, and customers, there is a growing demand for (...)
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  46. Illegitimate Values, Confirmation Bias, and Mandevillian Cognition in Science.Uwe Peters - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axy079.
    In the philosophy of science, it is a common proposal that values are illegitimate in science and should be counteracted whenever they drive inquiry to the confirmation of predetermined conclusions. Drawing on recent cognitive scientific research on human reasoning and confirmation bias, I argue that this view should be rejected. Advocates of it have overlooked that values that drive inquiry to the confirmation of predetermined conclusions can contribute to the reliability of scientific inquiry at the group level even (...)
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  47. Aesthetic Values in Science.Milena Ivanova - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (10):e12433.
    Scientists often use aesthetic values in the evaluation and choice of theories. Aesthetic values are not only regarded as leading to practically more useful theories but are often taken to stand in a special epistemic relation to the truth of a theory such that the aesthetic merit of a theory is evidence of its truth. This paper explores what aesthetic considerations influence scientists' reasoning, how such aesthetic values relate to the utility of a scientific theory, and how (...)
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  48.  13
    What’s Wrong with Permaculture Design Courses? Brazilian Lessons for Agroecological Movement-Building in Canada.Marie-Josée Massicotte & Christopher Kelly-Bisson - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (3):581-594.
    This paper focuses on the centrality of permaculture design courses as the principal sociopolitical strategy of the permaculture community in Canada to transform local food production practices. Building on the work of Antonio Gramsci and political agroecology as a framework of analysis, we argue that permaculture instruction remains deeply embedded within market and colonial relations, which orients the pedagogy of permaculture trainings in such a way as to reproduce the basic elements of the colonial capitalist economy among its practitioners. (...)
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    Using Democratic Values in Science: An Objection and Response.Andrew Schroeder - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1044-1054.
    Many philosophers of science have argued that social and ethical values have a significant role to play in core parts of the scientific process. This naturally suggests the following question: when such value choices need to be made, which or whose values should be used? A common answer to this question turns to democratic values—the values of the public or its representatives. I argue that this imposes a morally significant burden on certain scientists, effectively requiring them (...)
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    Values in Pure and Applied Science.Sven Ove Hansson - 2007 - Foundations of Science 12 (3):257-268.
    In pure science, the standard approach to non-epistemic values is to exclude them as far as possible from scientific deliberations. When science is applied to practical decisions, non-epistemic values cannot be excluded. Instead, they have to be combined with scientific information in a way that leads to practically optimal decisions. A normative model is proposed for the processing of information in both pure and applied science. A general-purpose corpus of scientific knowledge, with high entry requirements, has a central (...)
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