10 found
Order:
  1. From the Archives of Scientific Diplomacy: Science and the Shared Interests of Samuel Hartlib’s London and Frederick Clodius’s Gottorf.Vera Keller & Leigh T. I. Penman - 2015 - Isis 106 (1):17-42.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2.  11
    Accounting for Invention: Guido Pancirolli’s Lost and Found Things and the Development of Desiderata.Vera Keller - 2012 - Journal of the History of Ideas 73 (2):223-245.
  3.  16
    Drebbel's Living Instruments, Hartmann's Microcosm, and Libavius's Thelesmos: Epistemic Machines Before Descartes.Vera Keller - 2010 - History of Science 48 (1):39.
  4.  28
    The Centre of Nature: Baron Johann Otto von Hellwig Between a Global Network and a Universal Republic.Vera Keller - 2012 - Early Science and Medicine 17 (5):570-588.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  13
    The Social and Economic Roots of the Scientific Revolution: Texts by Boris Hessen and Henryk Grossman.Vera Keller - 2011 - Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):364-365.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  7
    Introduction: The Nature of Invention.Alexander Marr & Vera Keller - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (3):283-286.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  1
    Nero and the Last Stalk of Silphion: Collecting Extinct Nature in Early Modern Europe.Vera Keller - 2014 - Early Science and Medicine 19 (5):424-447.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Knowledge and the Public Interest, 1575–1725.Vera Keller - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Many studies relate modern science to modern political and economic thought. Using one shift in order to explain the other, however, has begged the question of modernity's origins. New scientific and political reasoning emerged simultaneously as controversial forms of probabilistic reasoning. Neither could ground the other. They both rejected logical systems in favor of shifting, incomplete, and human-oriented forms of knowledge which did not meet accepted standards of speculative science. This study follows their shared development by tracing one key political (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Katherine Eggert. Disknowledge: Literature, Alchemy, and the End of Humanism in Renaissance England. Ix + 351 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. $55. [REVIEW]Vera Keller - 2016 - Isis 107 (4):831-832.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. The “New World of Sciences”: The Temporality of the Research Agenda and the Unending Ambitions of Science.Vera Keller - 2012 - Isis 103 (4):727-734.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography