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  1.  30
    Giving Orders: Theory and Practice in the Fundamental Constitutions of Carolina.Vicki Hsueh - 2002 - Journal of the History of Ideas 63 (3):425-446.
  2.  5
    Colonialism and its Legacies.Taiaike Alfred, Dipesh Chakabarty, Enrique Dussel, Emmanuel Eze, Vicki Hsueh, Margaret Kohn, Pratap Bhanu Mehta, Sankar Muthu, Bhikhu Parekh, Jennifer Pitts, Ofelia Schutte, Jessé Souza & Iris Marion Young - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    Colonialism and Its Legacy brings together essays by leading scholars in both the fields of political theory and the history of political thought about European colonialism and its legacies, and postcolonial social and political theory. The essays explore the ways in which European colonial projects structured and shaped much of modern political theory, how concepts from political philosophy affected and were realized in colonial and imperial practice, and how we can understand the intellectual and social world left behind by a (...)
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  3.  34
    Cultivating and Challenging the Common: Lockean Property, Indigenous Traditionalisms, and the Problem of Exclusion.Vicki Hsueh - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):193.
    The article takes up and challenges the Lockean conception of common sense and common right to property in two ways: first, through a critical investigation of Locke's historical connection to colonialism, and second, by turning to contemporary indigenous conceptions of common sense. Locke's practical experiences in the founding of Carolina, I argue, serve not simply to explain the problematical colonial impulses of the Second Treatise, but indeed to help undo the credibility of that text's ideological claim to acquire and assimilate. (...)
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  4.  18
    Of Virtuality and Paradoxes: Vox Populi and the Retrospective Validation of Democratic Enactment.Vicki Hsueh - 2011 - Theory and Event 14 (2).
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    Cultivating and Challenging the Common: Lockean Property, Indigenous Traditionalisms, and the Problem of Exclusion.Vicki Hsueh - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):193-214.
    The article takes up and challenges the Lockean conception of common sense and common right to property in two ways: first, through a critical investigation of Locke's historical connection to colonialism, and second, by turning to contemporary indigenous conceptions of common sense. Locke's practical experiences in the founding of Carolina, I argue, serve not simply to explain the problematical colonial impulses of the Second Treatise, but indeed to help undo the credibility of that text's ideological claim to acquire and assimilate. (...)
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