Order:
  1.  2
    Overruling Parental Decisions in Paediatric Medicine: A Comparison of Diekema’s Harm Threshold Framework and the Zone of Parental Discretion Framework.Vicki Xafis - 2017 - Clinical Ethics 12 (3):143-149.
    BackgroundThe complexity of decision-making in the paediatric context is well recognised. In the majority of cases, parents and healthcare professionals work together to decide which treatments the paediatric patient should receive. On occasions, however, parental wishes conflict with what clinicians think is best for the paediatric patient. Where persistent disagreement between clinicians and parents exists, clinicians must ascertain if they have a moral, professional, and legal obligation to overrule the parents' decision and implement their preferred option.PurposeFew decision-making frameworks to assist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  6
    The Acceptability of Conducting Data Linkage Research Without Obtaining Consent: Lay People’s Views and Justifications.Vicki Xafis - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):79.
    A key ethical issue arising in data linkage research relates to consent requirements. Patients’ consent preferences in the context of health research have been explored but their consent preferences regarding data linkage specifically have been under-explored. In addition, the views on data linkage are often those of patient groups. As a result, little is known about lay people’s views and their preferences about consent requirements in the context of data linkage. This study explores lay people’s views and justifications regarding the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  5
    Ethical Language and Decision-Making for Prenatally Diagnosed Lethal Malformations.Dominic Wilkinson, Lachlan De Crespigny & Vicki Xafis - unknown
    In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as ‘lethal’ or as ‘incompatible with life’. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated ‘lethal’ reveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography