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Victor J. Krebs
Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú
  1. Seeing Wittgenstein Anew.William Day & Victor J. Krebs (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Seeing Wittgenstein Anew is the first collection to examine Ludwig Wittgenstein’s remarks on the concept of aspect-seeing. These essays show that aspect-seeing was not simply one more topic of investigation in Wittgenstein’s later writings, but, rather, that it was a pervasive and guiding concept in his efforts to turn philosophy’s attention to the actual conditions of our common life in language. Arranged in sections that highlight the pertinence of the aspect-seeing remarks to aesthetic and moral perception, self-knowledge, mind and consciousness, (...)
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  2.  58
    Seeing Aspects in Wittgenstein.William Day & Victor J. Krebs - 2010 - In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the introduction to Seeing Wittgenstein Anew, eds. William Day & Victor J. Krebs (Cambridge UP, 2010), a collection of essays on Ludwig Wittgenstein's remarks on aspect-seeing. Section 1: Why Seeing Aspects Now?; Section 2: The Importance of Seeing Aspects; Section 3: The Essays. (The front matter to Seeing Wittgenstein Anew appears above under "Books.").
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  3. ¿principio De Caridad O Hybris?Victor J. Krebs - 2008 - Revista de Filosofía (Venezuela) 60 (3):61-90.
    “¿Principio de caridad o hybris?” La intuición de Wittgenstein, de que el significado lingüístico se constituye dentro de la trama de vida pareciera hacer posible un acercamiento entre la tradición hermenéutica continental y la filosofía analítica del lenguaje. En el presente artículo se sostiene que esta intuición debe ir acompañada de una revisión de la concepción del sujeto implícita en el “principio de caridad” de Donald Davidson. Sin esa reconcepción, el principio de caridad se convierte en una forma encubierta de (...)
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  4. The Bodily Root: Seeing Aspects and Inner Experience.Victor J. Krebs - 2010 - In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press.
  5.  55
    'Around the Axis of Our Real Need': On the Ethical Point of Wittgenstein's Philosophy.Victor J. Krebs - 2001 - European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):344-374.
  6.  49
    'Around the Axis of Our Real Need': On the Ethical Point of Wittgenstein's Philosophy.Victor J. Krebs - 2001 - European Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):344–374.
  7.  27
    The Subtle Body of Language and the Lost Sense of Philosophy.Victor J. Krebs - 2000 - Philosophical Investigations 23 (2):147–155.
  8.  15
    Gramáticas espectrales. Entre Wittgenstein, Deleuze y Derrida.Victor J. Krebs - 2016 - Estudios de Filosofía: Revista del Seminaro de Filosofia del instituto Riva-Aguero 14:171-187.
    “Wittgenstein’s Ghosts. Between Deleuze and Derrida”. Both Derrida and Deleuze agree that with the advent of the moving image and the art of film, we need to articulate a new ontology or –in Wittgenstein’s terms–, a new grammar. Derrida suggests this much when he reflects on what he calls the return of ghosts, which he attributes to the advent of film and the communications media; Deleuze does the same in his studies of film, and in particular in what he calls (...)
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    Mind, Soul, Language in Wittgenstein.Victor J. Krebs - 1998 - The Paideia Archive: Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 32:48-53.
    I show that the latter Wittgenstein's treatment of language and the mind results in a conception of the human subject that goes against the exclusive emphasis on the cognitive that characterizes our modern conception of knowledge and the self. For Wittgenstein, our identification with the cognitive ego is tantamount to a blindness to our own nature — blindness that is entrenched in our present culture. The task of philosophy is thus transformed into a form of cultural therapy that seeks to (...)
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    Gramáticas espectrales. Entre Wittgenstein, Deleuze y Derrida.Victor J. Krebs - 2016 - Estudios de Filosofía 14:171-187.
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  11.  3
    Poison and Remedy.Victor J. Krebs - 2017 - Dialogue and Universalism 27 (1):83-89.
    The Digital Revolution is transforming the way in which we interact with one another and relate to experience. The superabundance and superfluity of the virtual world, the fleeting moment and instantaneous pleasure it provides, begin to prevail as a cultural value and determine an attitude of detachment and indifference that extends to all aspects of our life. For Søren Kierkegaard this is a “demoniacal temptation” that leads to a life devoid of spiritual depth. In the midst of the undeniable bounties (...)
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  12. Seeing Wittgenstein Anew.Norton Batkin, Sandra Laugier, Timouthy Gould, Stanley Cavell, Garry L. Hagberg & Victor J. Krebs - unknown - Cambridge University Press.
     
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  13. Wittgenstein's Transcendentalism.Victor J. Krebs - 1992 - Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
    Wittgenstein's later philosophy is usually characterized as pragmatist, his account of linguistic meaning as conventionalist, and his methodology as naturalistic. Wittgenstein is said to have renounced in the later work his early concern with the Unsayable, and to have relocated philosophy within the realm of discourse. I argue against that picture of Wittgenstein's later philosophy in this dissertation. ;The central insight of Wittgenstein's discussion of rules and language in the Investigations is that meaning is not the result of a cognitive (...)
     
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